World Forum for Medicine - International Trade Fair with conferences and forums for Medical Technology, Electromedicine, Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostics and Drugs. Düsseldorf. -- MEDICA Trade Fair -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

News from the editors of MEDICA-tradefair.com

Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness
Personalized medicine - delivering therapies specially tailored to a patient's unique physiology - has been a goal of researchers and doctors for a long time. New research provides a way of delivering personalized treatments to patients with neurological disease.
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Artificial intelligence helps predict drug combinations' side effects
Last month alone, 23 percent of Americans took two or more prescription drugs, according to one CDC estimate, and 39 percent over age 65 take five or more, a number that's increased three-fold in the last several decades. And if that isn't surprising enough, try this one: in many cases, doctors have no idea what side effects might arise from adding another drug to a patient's personal pharmacy.
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MRI reveals: Every person has a unique brain anatomy
Like with fingerprints, no two people have the same brain anatomy, a study by researchers of the University of Zurich has shown. This uniqueness is the result of a combination of genetic factors and individual life experiences.
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Blood flow in the heart revealed in a flash
Researchers at Linköping University have for the first time been able to use information from computer tomography images to simulate the heart function of an individual patient. Some of the modelling methods they use have been developed in the motor industry.
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Big Data analysis identifies new cancer risk genes
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona developed a new method to systematically identify genes contributing to heritable cancer risk. Their work, which is published in Nature Communications, is a success story for data sharing and openness in science. Just three researchers identified new cancer genes only using publically available data.
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Visualized: exercises creates optimal brain state
If you want to learn to walk a tightrope, it's a good idea to go for a short run after each practice session. That’s because a recent study in NeuroImage demonstrates that exercise performed immediately after practicing a new motor skill improves its long-term retention.
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New software for rapid, automated identification of dendritic spines
Is it possible for microscopes to learn a bit about the brain? Even be taught by neuroscientists to reliably recognize parts of brain cells - all on their own? Though it may seem like something straight out of The Jetsons, a neuroscientist and software engineer in the lab of MPFI's Scientific Director is developing new software with the goal of vastly improving the daily life of a microscope user.
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Novel PET imaging to evaluate rheumatoid arthritis inflammation
A new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method more fully evaluates the extent of rheumatoid arthritis by targeting translocator protein (TSPO) expression in the synovium (joint lining tissue). The study is featured in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
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Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays
Artificial intelligence (AI) holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics. But before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for.
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Model automates molecule design to speed drug development
Designing new molecules for pharmaceuticals is primarily a manual, time-consuming process that's prone to error. But MIT researchers have now taken a step toward fully automating the design process, which could drastically speed things up - and produce better results.
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