More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

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Digital and automated laboratory – Robots as multifunctional helpers

26/11/2021

A lot of laboratory tasks require high precision on one hand, on the other they tend to be repetitive and tiring. While humans can only work for a limited time here while staying effective, robots are able to work without taking a break. The start-up bAhead wants to make collaborative robots, CoBots, adaptable helpers with the help of AI. We learn more from CEO & Founder Rainer Treptow.
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AI helps to correct distortions in in vivo photoacoustic images of humans

26/11/2021

Obtaining an accurate speed of sound (SoS) inside the body leads to improved resolution of ultrasound or photoacoustic (PA) images. However, it is difficult to accurately predict the SoS since it differs from person to person, depending on the random distribution of muscle, bone, and fat in each individual.
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Common wearable fitness tracker helps clinicians assess at-home recovery after kids' surgery

25/11/2021

A recent study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that using a consumer-grade wearable device to track a child's heart rate and physical activity after surgery could help clinicians decide if at-home recovery is going as expected or if an emergency department (ED) visit is needed to address possible complications.
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Image: Images of bone marrow cells; Copyright: Helmholtz Munich / Carsten Marr

Fighting blood diseases with artificial intelligence

24/11/2021

How can we better diagnose blood diseases? A research group aims to answer this question with artificial intelligence (AI). Their goal is to facilitate the time-consuming analysis of bone marrow cells under the microscope. The researchers developed the largest open-source database on microscopic images of bone marrow cells to date.
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Image: Biopsy-free virtual histology of skin; Copyright: Aydogan Ozcan, PhD

New imaging technology may reduce need for skin biopsies

24/11/2021

Instead of surgically removing a sample of skin, sending it to a lab and waiting several days for results, your dermatologist takes pictures of a suspicious-looking lesion and quickly produces a detailed, microscopic image of the skin.
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AI and genomic surveillance combine to detect health care infectious disease outbreaks

22/11/2021

By coupling machine learning with whole genome sequencing, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Carnegie Mellon University scientists greatly improved the quick detection of infectious disease outbreaks within a hospital setting over traditional methods for tracking outbreaks.
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Deep learning for extremity radiographs confounded by labels

19/11/2021

According to an open-access Editor's Choice article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), convolutional neural networks (CNN) trained to identify abnormalities on upper extremity radiographs are susceptible to a ubiquitous confounding image feature that could limit their clinical utility: radiograph labels.
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Artificial intelligence–based method predicts risk of atrial fibrillation

19/11/2021

Atrial fibrillation—an irregular and often rapid heart rate—is a common condition that often leads to the formation of clots in the heart that can travel to the brain to cause a stroke. A researchers team has developed an artificial intelligence–based method for identifying patients who are at risk for developing atrial fibrillation and could therefore benefit from preventative measures.
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The laboratory industry between Corona and AI

17/11/2021

The laboratory industry is currently in commotion: the whole world is watching when it comes to news from the Corona pandemic. But tests and the sequencing of new variants are not the only stress factors: robotics, networking and AI are finding their ways into laboratories and turn existing processes upside down. We talked to some of the exhibitors at MEDICA 2021 about this.
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Diabetes retinal screening through deep learning

11/11/2021

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a complication of the retina brought about by diabetes, is one of the most frequent reasons for vision loss in European adults between 25 and 60 years of age. When detected early, treatment can effectively reduce or prevent vision loss. To date however, national screening programs have been available in only a few countries and even then, they are costly.
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Development of artificial intelligence technology for producing CT images based on MRI

10/11/2021

Transcranial focused ultrasound can be used to treat degenerative movement disorders, intractable pain, and mental disorders by delivering ultrasound energy to a specific area of the brain without opening the skull. This treatment must be performed with an image-based technology that can locate the brain lesions. Doctors typically use CT to obtain information about a patient's skull.
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Image: Ribosome-antibiotic complex; Copyright: Elsa Sanchez-Garcia

Supercomputers joined the fight against antibiotic resistance

10/11/2021

The development of antibiotics is one of the most significant breakthroughs in medicine. However, pathogens develop resistance mechanisms that thwart the effectiveness of antibiotics. Around 700,000 people die every year because of such resistant bacteria. Thanks to simulation strategies, supercomputers can help speed up the much-needed development of new antibiotic variants.
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A new pandemic simulator helps predict the evolution of pandemics

09/11/2021

Researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València, belonging to the ALFA group of the Valencian Institute of Artificial Intelligence (VRAIN), have participated in the development and validation of a new pandemic simulator that helps to predict the evolution of pandemics in different epidemiological scenarios.
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AI: better prognoses, but more validation work is needed

09/11/2021

Artificial intelligence has become hugely more important in medicine. This is mainly due to the availability of ever increasing amounts of patient data. Despite this humans are often unable to properly process this much information because of limiting factors such as personnel or time availability, cognitive capacity and financial factors. The result of that is misdiagnosis.
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AI: New insights into kidney disease with tropical frog models

08/11/2021

Using cutting-edge genetic engineering, UZH researchers have developed a model to study hereditary kidney disease with the help of tropical frogs. The method allows them to collect large amounts of data on anomalies, which can then be analyzed using artificial intelligence. The research opens up new opportunities in the search for new treatment approaches for the hitherto incurable disease.
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Image: The new procedure is intended to detect the causes of back problems more efficiently; Copyright: SZB

Back problems: AI will provide personalised diagnosis

02/11/2021

Back problems are generally regarded as a widespread disease with many sufferers struggling with pain. A team of researchers from TU Kaiserslautern, the University Medical Centre in Mainz and several companies is working on a method that will enable more efficient monitoring of malpositions and strains on the back. Artificial intelligence methods are also being used.
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Image: Entrance of the Messe Düsseldorf, at the floor a MEDICA logo next to the writing “MEDICA – Welcome”; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA 2021: Return to the fair halls!

02/11/2021

The last year was quite different, since MEDICA had to take place online due to the Corona pandemic – but in 2021 we return to the fair halls in Düsseldorf again! There are not only about 2.900 exhibitors from 70 nations expecting you, but also a rich program in our forums and conferences. We took an advanced peek on some of the exciting highlights for you in our Topic of the Month.
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AI in healthcare: How to build a technology ecosystem

02/11/2021

Taiwan has long been a model for the implementation and use of new technologies. It is thus only natural that Taiwanese companies are forerunners when it comes to Artificial Intelligence (AI) in healthcare. This is also one of the topics of this year’s MEDICA CONNECTED HEALTHCARE FORUM.
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Image: A research team around Robin Maack und Kurt Schardt is working on the new software; Copyright: TUK

New technique to identify and predict stroke lesions

27/10/2021

Strokes are the cause of various disabilities, as they damage the brain such that some areas do not function properly any more. Those areas are called lesions. Directly identifying or predicting lesions in clinical daily routine is still not possible with today's imaging tools, creating the need for new software solutions.
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DFKI spin-off coneno supports Dutch and Belgian health organizations in monitoring COVID-19

26/10/2021

COVID 19 has shown how important comprehensive basic information on infection pathways, disease progression and symptoms are for both the estimation of the pandemic course and for long-term research. The CASE platform of the DFKI spin-off coneno, founded in 2016, supports the monitoring of infectious diseases through direct participation of the population.
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Image: Different types of images; Copyright: Nina Shvetsova et al./IEEE Access

Artificial intelligence spots anomalies in medical images

22/10/2021

Scientists from Skoltech, Philips Research, and Goethe University Frankfurt have trained a neural network to detect anomalies in medical images to assist physicians in sifting through countless scans in search of pathologies. Reported in ​​IEEE Access, the new method is adapted to the nature of medical imaging and is more successful in spotting abnormalities than general-purpose solutions.
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Image: Researchers at Icahn School of Medicine developed an electrocardiogram-reading algorithm that can detect subtle signs of heart failure; Copyright: Glicksberg and Nadkarni labs

Scientists show how AI may spot unseen signs of heart failure

19/10/2021

A special artificial intelligence (AI)-based computer algorithm created by Mount Sinai researchers was able to learn how to identify subtle changes in electrocardiograms (also known as ECGs or EKGs) to predict whether a patient was experiencing heart failure.
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AI-based technology quickly identifies genetic causes of serious disease

14/10/2021

An artificial intelligence (AI)-based technology rapidly diagnoses rare disorders in critically ill children with high accuracy, according to a report by scientists from University of Utah Health and Fabric Genomics, collaborators on a study led by Rady Children’s Hospital in San Diego.
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Image: Diabetes detection from whole-body magnetic resonance imaging with deep learning; Copyright: DZD, JCI Insight

Diabetes detection with whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

13/10/2021

Type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with a whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. This is shown by a current study. They used deep learning methods* and data from more than 2000 MRIs to identify patients with (pre-) diabetes. The results have now been published in the journal JCI Insight.
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Image: OPTIMA (Optimal Treatment for Patients with Solid Tumours in Europe Through Artificial intelligence); Copyright: OPTIMA

OPTIMA aims to improve treatment for prostate, breast and lung cancer through AI

12/10/2021

The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) – a joint undertaking of the European Union and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA) – announced the launch of OPTIMA, a € 21.3 million public-private research programme that will seek to use artificial intelligence (AI) to improve care for patients with prostate, breast and lung cancer.
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The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01/10/2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: Karolinska Institutet researchers Johan Hartman (left), Mattias Rantalainen and Yinxi Wang (right).  ; Copyright: Stefan Zimmerman.

AI improves precision in breast cancer diagnosis

01/10/2021

Researchers have developed an AI-based tool that improves the diagnosis of breast cancer tumours and the ability to predict the risk of recurrence. The greater diagnostic precision can lead to more personalised treatment for the large group of breast cancer patients with intermediate risk tumours. The results are published in the scientific journal Annals of Oncology.
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Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01/10/2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
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Image: Man wearing the AI-driven dynamic face mask; Copyright: ACS Nano 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c06204

AI-driven dynamic face mask adapts to exercise, pollution levels

30/09/2021

Researchers have developed a dynamic respirator that modulates its pore size in response to changing conditions, such as exercise or air pollution levels, allowing the wearer to breathe easier when the highest levels of filtration are not required.
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Image: Schemativ of biological presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons and a synapse (inset); Copyright: Korea Institute Of Science and Technology

Development of dendritic-network-implementable artificial neurofiber transistors

23/09/2021

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) has reported that a research team has developed organic neurofiber transistors with an architecture and functions similar to those of neurons in the human brain, which can be used as a neural network.
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Artificial intelligence could help diagnose lung cancer a year earlier

21/09/2021

An artificial intelligence (AI) program can spot signs of lung cancer on CT scans a year before they can be diagnosed with existing methods, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.
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Image: Representation of flow cytometric data - as seen by artificial intelligence; Copyright: Max Zhao

Artificial intelligence helps diagnose leukemia

20/09/2021

The University of Bonn shows how machine learning improves the evaluation of blood analysis data and Artificial intelligence helps to diagnose leukemia.
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Image: Structure of the SARS-CoV-2 protein NSP1 (blue) in complex with a host ribosome (grey); Copyright: Seán O’Donoghue/Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Machine learning assisted structure analysis reveals SARS-CoV-2 virus tactics

15/09/2021

The proteins of SARS-CoV-2 play key roles in how the virus manages to evade immune defense and replicate itself in patients’ cells. An international research team has now compiled the most detailed view of the virus' protein structures available to date. The analysis employing artificial intelligence methods has revealed surprising findings.
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Image: Gabriel Popescu, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Copyright: Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology

Microscopy plus AI equals rapid COVID-19 detection

14/09/2021

Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology combined label-free microscopic imaging with artificial intelligence to quickly detect and classify SARS-CoV-2.
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Image: TTSH’s Dr Leonard Yip (left) and NTU Singapore’s Assoc Prof Wang Lipo show their new method to screen glaucoma; Copyright: NTU Singapore

Singapore scientists develop AI-powered system to diagnose glaucoma using eye images

08/09/2021

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), in collaboration with clinicians at Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) in Singapore have developed a novel method that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to screen for glaucoma, a group of eye diseases that can cause vision loss and blindness through damage to the optic nerve at the back of the eye.
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Image: Video recording from mother and child. Algorithm on the right side which analyses the children’s movements on video; Copyright: Kojovic, Natraj, Mohanty, Maillart, Schaer

Using video for the early detection of autism

07/09/2021

The team at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm based on the automated analysis of videos, making it possible to study children’s non-verbal communication in an anonymous and standardised manner.
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Machine learning tool detects the risk of genetic syndromes in children

03/09/2021

With an average accuracy of 88%, a deep learning technology offers rapid genetic screening that could accelerate the diagnosis of genetic syndromes, recommending further investigation or referral to a specialist in seconds.
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More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

01/09/2021

Wearables are increasingly being used in sports medicine, for example, to prevent injuries or to provide users individually with real-time data about their fitness and health. By analyzing this data, risks for sports injuries can be identified early and training can be customized to the user's needs and goals.
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Running: how to prevent injuries with sensors and AI

01/09/2021

The most common injury that affects runners stems from overuse, not falls. Early warning signs include changes in motion. Successful injury prevention could pick up on this aspect by detecting and responding to these deviations at an early stage. It is the focus of the "Smart Injury Prevention" project.
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Image: a woman with dark hair doing sit ups, wearing a fitnesstracker; Copyright: Robert Bosch GmbH

Avoid injuries, improve training – with self-learning sensors

01/09/2021

Artificial intelligence, sensors, wearables: they all collect and process data from their wearers. They are particularly popular in sports, because users no longer have to rely on their intuition, but can optimise their training based on sober, exact data. However, wearables are often criticized for being not only practical gadgets but also data krakens.
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Image: woman wearing sports clothing stretches her leg, she wears a smart watch; Copyright: PantherMedia/Maridav (YAYMicro)

Wearables: smart helpers in sports medicine

01/09/2021

Heart rate monitoring, step-counting, sleep tracking: Wearable technologies keep evolving, offering more and more useful applications. Usually worn close to and/or on the surface of the skin, they are equipped with special sensors to detect and analyze information concerning physical signals or ambient data. This allows wearers to get immediate biofeedback.
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Image: Surface of the CASUS-Software; Copyright: Universität Augsburg

Learning at your own pace: virtual patients in medical education

22/07/2021

As an important part of their education, medical students learn clinical skills by practicing on patients. Unfortunately, this was sometimes not an option amid the COVID-19 pandemic. The solution? Training with virtual patients. Even post-pandemic, they are a great learning tool for future medical professionals.
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Accelerating digitization of hospitals through innovation

10/06/2021

Helping hospitals in Germany build a long-term digitization strategy - that is the declared goal of the young founding team of the innovation go platform, which started at the Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences. The project is funded by EXIST, a support program of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi).
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Treatment table in an intensive care unit in a hospital; Copyright: PantherMedia / sudok1

Smart Expert System Assists Medical Diagnostics

12/05/2021

A current research project develops a system designed to support critical care physicians in the future. The research project "A Learning and Interoperable Smart Expert System for Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine (ELISE)" uses data collected via machine learning algorithms to assist diagnostic decision-making.
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Digital healthcare: Treating patients at home

03/05/2021

Digital health apps (DiGA) are increasingly becoming part of patients' everyday lives. Since the "apps on prescription" are thoroughly tested by the BfArM before approval, they are currently only tailored to individual diseases. In this Topic of the Month, we take a look at the place DiGAs already occupy in healthcare today and how they will continue to develop in the future.
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Image: Two hospital employees fill a shelf in a storage room with medical supplies; Copyright: PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

Hospital logistics: three action steps to future success

22/04/2021

Behind every hospital are sophisticated and complex logistics that must run like clockwork to keep things going. But how good are the processes when it comes to managing patient care and hospital staff? There are many weak links that can be avoided. Comprehensive digitization and efficient, targeted healthcare workforce management are required to set up hospital logistics for future success.
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Image: A woman sitting in front of a device for an eye examination; Copyright: PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

Alzheimer's disease: early detection using an eye exam

22/03/2021

Alzheimer's disease is still incurable, but if detected early enough, countermeasures can improve treatment and slow the progression. Unfortunately, there is still no reliable early detection test at this juncture. This might soon change thanks to a non-invasive spectroscopy of the retina.
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Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08/03/2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
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Image: disinfection of a door handle around which coronaviruses are flying; Copyright: PantherMedia/AntonMatyukha

Necessity is the mother of invention – innovations in the corona pandemic

01/03/2021

Keeping your distance, washing your hands, wearing a mask – such protective measures have been the order of the day since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began. But appropriate products or procedures are not suitable for everyone, are often unavailable or, despite everything, carry a residual risk. The need for new, better solutions is high. But necessity is the mother of invention.
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Image: A physician with a tablet computer in one hand is standing next to a patient’s bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia LtD

Hospital: how an AI tool could improve patient safety

22/02/2021

Sometimes, a hospital stay can proceed successfully without a hitch. At other times, there might be an unexpected turn of events if the patient exhibits complications. Early identification of these patients could prevent unnecessary suffering. A new research project intends to develop an AI-based tool that predicts a patient’s risk of complications at an early stage.
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Image: a woman wearing a wearable EEG that looks like a headband; Copyright: Evercot AI GmbH

Good connection: AI and EEG work hand in hand

17/02/2021

Artificial intelligences (AI) are able to help medical professionals detect diseases. This is based on medical data records from which the AI can draw conclusions about diseases. These conclusions are most accurate when the extraction of the data sets is directly linked to the processing.
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Gender medicine – analog and digital

10/02/2021

There are key differences between men and women, yet medicine has been treating both sexes the same for decades. As a result, women may not always receive the most optimal care. While there is now a shift in mindset, previous findings and outdated thinking patterns are far too often still finding their way into digital health services and technologies.
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Image: A physician is looking at a tablet computer while two nurses care for an intensive care patient in the background; Copyright: PantherMedia/SimpleFoto

BabSim.Hospital: forecasting hospital bed needs

04/02/2021

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, capacity of intensive care units is a hot-button issue as this determines the number of severe COVID-19 cases hospitals can treat. The percentage of currently infected patients can deliver insights into the projected need for ICU beds down the road. The TH Köln developed a tool to help with this planning process.
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small star-shaped machines between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Michael Osterrieder

Autonomous medical devices: running well in your body

01/02/2021

In theory, autonomous medical technologies can be used in a diagnostic or therapeutic capacity inside the body under certain conditions. This may not sound like a new invention at first. After all, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators have monitored and fixed abnormal heart rhythm for many years.
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Image: Artist’s rendering of small robots with grapplers and searchlights that swim between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andreus

Autonomous medical technology: independently in the body

01/02/2021

Therapies need to be carried out with high reliability by trained personal. This will not change in the future. But maybe we will be able to let systems in the patient’s body do some of the work. Some approaches are already aiming to make implants more independent so they will be able to flexibly react to changes. Read more in our Topic of the Month!
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Asthma: Self-management thanks to apps and wearables

11/01/2021

Today, managing one's own chronic disease is hardly possible without digital helpers – not least because of the corona pandemic. People with asthma also benefit from apps and wearables. They help patients connect better with doctors and better understand their own disease. Our Topic of the Month looks at why this is so important and what the digital services can do.
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Image: empty operating room with disinfection robot; Copyright: stock.adobe.com/allensima

Disinfection: a robot nips viruses in the bud

02/11/2020

Hospitals are considered to be a primary route of disease transmission. That is why patient rooms, operating rooms, and waiting areas should be disinfected regularly and thoroughly - and not just during the coronavirus pandemic. At the virtual.MEDICA trade fair, ICA Traffic GmbH will showcase the HERO21 robot, a disinfection unit that uses UVC radiation.
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Image: The hand of a hospital employee at a device next to an intensive care bed with a patient in it; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

AI predicts a patient's risk of postoperative complications

22/10/2020

Whether it is a routine surgery or a personalized surgical intervention that perhaps has never been done before: There is always a residual risk involved. That’s why hospitals monitor and supervise patient care before, during, and after surgery to be ready for immediate intervention if needed.
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Image: Patient lying in a hospital bed with a monitor attached; Copyright: BEWATEC

ConnectedCare: hospital roadmap to becoming a Smart Hospital

01/10/2020

Scheduling, bed management, and menu ordering – today’s hospitals take advantage of a variety of digital services. In the worst-case scenario, each service requires a different interface to the central information system, marking a major barrier that holds back digitization. With ConnectedCare, BEWATEC shows there is a better way.
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Image: Symbols from everyday hospital life as digital images coming from a stethoscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

Smart Hospital: Digitally Connected Healthcare

01/10/2020

Every year, new technologies hit the market. They expand, update, and connect hospitals and healthcare facilities. But advancing digitization not only accelerates the speed of improvements, it also uncovers problem areas that must still be fixed.
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Image: Connected areas of a treatment displayed as icons; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sonar

The digital hospital: integration and digitization

01/10/2020

Whether it's process automation, robotics in the OR and nursing areas, or the digitalization of patient records - in a smart hospital, everything comes together to form a connected hospital. Find out exactly how the Smart Hospital is being developed with the help of information platforms and projects in the Topic of the Month.
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Image: View into a device that automatically processes laboratory samples; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sonar

The laboratory 4.0: networked analyses

01/09/2020

There is likely no other branch of medicine where you can find as many high-tech devices as in modern laboratories. A major part of diagnostic and biomedical research is done here. A lot of individual steps in work processes need to be followed precisely to ensure the results’ quality. Also, a lot of data is generated here.
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Image: A miniaturized, round sensor under a fingertip; Copyright: TU Dresden

SmartLab: all-in-one automation, digitalization, and miniaturization

01/09/2020

Laboratories have to analyze and interpret an ever-increasing number of samples for research and diagnostic services, generating lots of data in the process. At the same time, labs are required to produce quality results and operate with speed. Processes that could once be managed using laboratory notebooks and isolated systems must become smart in the future to improve lab efficiency.
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Image: View into an automated laboratory machine that stores a lot of vials; Copyright: PantherMedia/kagemusha

The smart networking laboratory: when connected devices become one system

01/09/2020

Diagnostics, biomedical research, screening active ingredient candidates - laboratories perform many functions and must be flexible. Growing and evolving healthcare demands mean labs have to process an increasing number of samples. Modern laboratory information management systems can already support high-throughput, but a smart laboratory environment can make things even more efficient.
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Israeli medical devices showcase digital innovations at MEDICA

24/08/2020

For the annual MEDICA trade fair, companies from all over the world assemble in Düsseldorf. The Israel Export Institute has been a part of it for the last couple of years. They present medical devices and digital innovations from different Israeli companies at their joint booth.
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Image: Application of AR sonography; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGD

Augmented reality ultrasound: putting the focus on patients

10/08/2020

This is how a conventional ultrasound scan works: patients lie down on a table next to the ultrasound machine. A doctor uses a probe to scan the part of the body in question, while he or she looks at the pictures on a monitor. In other words, the physician either focuses on his/her hand on the patient or the monitor. The Fraunhofer IGD wants to change this process as part of the "sonAR" project.
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Image: Nurse checking surveillance monitor at the bedside and writing down patient data on a clipboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

Big Data: early warning system for the ICU

03/08/2020

Patient monitoring systems in the ICU sound up to 700 alarms on average per patient per day, which boils down to one alarm every two minutes. An excessive number of them are false alarms. This generates vast amounts of data, which can make it difficult for doctors and nurses to identify the most critical alarms to manage. It also has a negative effect on the treatment of intensive care patients.
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MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE: how data and AI help sports

16/06/2020

Karl Schwarzenbrunner is the head of the Education and Science Department at the German Ice Hockey Association, and also a speaker at the 8th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE 2020, which will take place this year on 18 and 19 November in Düsseldorf.
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Image: View of a robot-mounted system from above; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wedmov

Robots in the Operating Room: Improving Training and Safety

04/05/2020

Surgical robots are transforming the operating room. They deliver many benefits but also present new challenges. That is why the efficient handling of robotic mechanisms must also be reflected in the respective training courses.
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Image: Robotic arm used for surgical operations; Copyright: panthermedia.net/markoaliaksandr

Innovative Robotic-Assisted Surgical Systems

04/05/2020

More compact, more flexibility, and more precision - these are the main characteristics developers strive for as they advance robotic-assisted surgical systems for the operating room. Several technology providers have already shown how it’s done, including the makers of the popular daVinci Surgical System. Yet for robotic-assisted systems, the sky is the limit.
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Image: Surgeon sitting at a robot-assisted operating system; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wedmov

Robotic-Assisted Surgery with the daVinci-System

04/05/2020

Robotic surgical systems are often used to perform minimally invasive procedures. The daVinci surgical system is still one of the market leaders and is especially well suited to perform prostatectomies, a surgical option for prostate cancer.
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Image: robotic system for assistance in surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Robotics in the OR: Relieving the surgeon

04/05/2020

In the operating room, minimally invasive procedures are increasingly used. Robot-assisted systems are a great help for the surgeon. They support the surgeon and are extremely precise. Through innovative research approaches, robotic systems are constantly evolving.
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Image: Smiling man is standing in nature with one had at his ear; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cristalov

In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22/04/2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Image: young woman makes an ultrasound with the new system and shows patient the image on her smartphone; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Ultrasound to go: versatile partner on hospital rounds

08/04/2020

The University Hospital Bonn has recently introduced an ultrasound device that's small enough to fit in your coat pocket. It's ready to use once you have connected it to a tablet or smartphone. The portable system makes bedside physical exams possible. The device primarily benefits students as it allows them to combine basic knowledge and clinical application.
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Image: A device with a large monitor and different control panels in a darkened laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Cardiovascular diseases: using AI to navigate the catheter

09/03/2020

Treatment of a heart attack or stroke caused by vascular occlusion must be prompt to prevent further damage to vital tissue. Unfortunately, the actual treatment is often preceded by a lengthy catheter-based procedure where the cardiologist manually guides the catheter to the affected vessel. AI might perform this task in the future.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03/02/2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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Image: Heart symbols are floating over a smartphone in the hand of a physician; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Digital cardiology: analyzing data beat by beat

03/02/2020

Chronic cardiovascular diseases are a growing burden worldwide. Most of them are diseases of civilization that spread, where lifestyle is improving or where it is good already. But the healthcare systems are not growing equally to keep up with this development. We can make up for this by making cardiological care smarter with eHealth and mHealth.
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