Medical implants: new generation of antibacterial materials
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Image: Surgical instruments in a metal sieve; Copyright: Chalabala

Chalabala

Sterile supplies: AI-based recognition of surgical instruments with Cir.Log

04.04.2024

The Cir.Log project between Charité Facility Management GmbH (CFM) and Fraunhofer IPK aims to increase the efficiency of sterile processing in hospitals and improve patient safety. Essentially, the aim is to create a smooth transition from current workflows to a more efficient, technology-supported system.
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Image: In the foreground, there is a testing sample held by a tweezer. In the background, a woman is looking at the sample; Copyright: HZDR / Anja Schneider

HZDR / Anja Schneider

HZDR team introduces novel pathogen detection approach

12.03.2024

Detecting diseases early or predicting their onset is crucial for healthcare. Dr. Larysa Baraban's team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) develops miniaturized biosensor devices using nanomaterials.
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Image: In the foreground, there is a golden chip, which is used for the analysis, held by two fingers. The background is black. Copyright: David Baillot/University of California San Diego

David Baillot/University of California San Diego

Faster and more accurate pathogen detection through DNA melting

05.03.2024

Unlike conventional blood cultures, which can take anywhere from 15 hours to several days to yield results, the new digital DNA melting analysis delivers actionable insights in under six hours. This accelerated turnaround time enables clinicians to initiate targeted treatment strategies promptly, minimizing the risk of disease progression and improving patient outcomes.
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Image: Laboratory technician places a tube with a urine sample in a centrifuge for diagnosis; Copyright: kolesnikovsergii

kolesnikovsergii

Smart infection diagnostics: UTI detection with AI

27.02.2024

Traditional detection for Urinary tract infections (UTIs), involving manual microscope examination of urine samples, is slow and time consuming. To improve efficiency, urine screening machines analyze various parameters like bacteria and white blood cells. However, interpreting this data is complex.
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Image: Storage room with sterilely packed textiles in a hospital; Copyright: Mint Images

Mint Images

Disinfection in hospitals: textiles inhibit pathogens

14.02.2024

Antimicrobial textiles can curb the spread of pathogens in hospitals. On the one hand, they reduce the amount of disinfection required by staff and, on the other, they increase the protection of patients against infection. Empa in Switzerland has tested the coating of curtains with antimicrobial substances in a study.
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Image: Two women looking at a display of cells on a monitor; Copyright: University of Jyväskylä

University of Jyväskylä

Antiviral resin destroys COVID-19 from plastic surfaces

06.02.2024

Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland are pioneering the development of antiviral surfaces to mitigate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly focusing on coronaviruses.
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Image: A woman in a blue lab coat sticks a patch on the arm of a young girl, both wearing a mask

Microneedle array patches: vaccinations made easy

29.01.2024

Dissolvable microneedle array patches (MAPs) consist of tiny, rapidly dissolving needles that can efficiently deliver vaccines into the skin. Their stability over time and easy application gives them great potential to not only simplify the vaccination process during a pandemic, but also in increase vaccination rates in low- and middle-income countries.
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Image: Nasal spray and stethoscope lie on a wooden table

Nasal antibody spray demonstrates potential for COVID-19 prevention

26.01.2024

Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have achieved a significant breakthrough in COVID-19 prevention with the development of a nasal antibody spray. This approach offers new possibilities for enhanced protection against SARS-CoV-2 and its various variants, providing hope for high-risk individuals.
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Image: Person holding a sample in a petri dish; Copyright: Freepik

Freepik

Enhancing urinary tract infection diagnosis with AI

23.01.2024

Researchers at Fraunhofer Austria and the AULSS2 Marca Trevigiana Institute in Treviso have leveraged artificial intelligence (AI) to streamline the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their advanced AI-based method promises to significantly reduce the workload of laboratories and expedite diagnosis times.
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Image: A high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP) up close; Copyright: UQ

UQ

Protecting against zika virus with a microarray patch

22.01.2024

In the global fight against the Zika virus, researchers are developing a vaccine patch that promises an effective and painless solution. This needle-free vaccine patch, utilizing the high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP).
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Image: The brain MRI scans were performed at the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization in Linköping. A woman prepares a man for a scan; Copyright: Magnus Johansson/Linköping University

Magnus Johansson/Linköping University

Advanced MRI technology detects changes in the brain after COVID-19

15.12.2023

Researchers at Linköping University have examined the brains of 16 patients previously hospitalised for COVID-19 with persisting symptoms. They have found differences in brain tissue structure between patients with persisting symptoms after COVID-19 and healthy people.
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Image: Close up: Positive COVID rapid test in a tray; Copyright: elenabednykh

elenabednykh

AI used in new COVID-19 test improves accuracy

06.12.2023

A new AI-assisted molecular diagnostic platform capable of identifying variants of COVID-19 and other infectious diseases has been developed by scientists in the UK. The low cost, portable device could play a crucial role in preventing future pandemics due to its accuracy and versatility.
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Image: Plasma ignition of the plasma source used: The plasma is visible here in a so-called filamentous discharge in the form of small purple flashes; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

Sterilization: how bacteria defend themselves against plasmas

04.12.2023

A research team headed by Professor Julia Bandow and Dr. Tim Dirks from the Chair for Applied Microbiology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, showed that bacteria that overproduce the heat shock protein Hsp33 can withstand plasma treatment more effectively than others.
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Image: Scanning electron microscopy, 30,000x magnification, colored: Even distribution of the antimicrobial coating on the textile fibers; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Antimicrobial hospital curtains - Bacteria, stay out!

01.12.2023

A coating process can be used to treat fabrics in such a way that bacterial and viral pathogens are killed or inhibited in their growth. In hospitals, the coated textiles could be used in future as antimicrobial curtains between patient beds, for example.
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Image: A woman in a green jacket with brown hair sits in front of a screen and smiles into the camera; Copyright: University of the Basque Country

University of the Basque Country

Models that predict poor clinical outcome in COVID-19 patients

24.11.2023

Factors associated with hospital admissions, ICU stays and mortality in patients who have had SARS-CoV-2 are identified, and clinical prediction rules are developed.
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Image: A group photo consisting of eleven people in front of a white wall. A confirmation of project funding is held in the camera; Copyright: HIPS

HIPS

Strengthening of drug bioinformatics at the Saarbrücken site

21.11.2023

In the context of the tenure negotiations for Drug Bioinformatics Professor Olga Kalinina, the Klaus Faber Foundation is providing €100,000 to the "bioINFpro" project, thereby enabling her long-term stay at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and Saarland University.
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Image: inexpensive do-it-yourself (DIY) “Corsi-Rosenthal Box” air purifier; Copyright: UConn photo

UConn photo

EPA testing shows the power of D-I-Y air filters to trap viruses

07.11.2023

There is a low-cost way for you to protect yourself and reduce your risk of respiratory diseases such as flu, RSV, and COVID-19. Build yourself a Corsi-Rosenthal box (CR box) in 30 minutes with just $60 worth of common hardware store supplies.
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Image: Close-up of a vaccination on a woman's arm; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

Coronavirus: Model can predict the evolution of new variants

31.10.2023

An international research team from the University of Cologne and the Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai (New York) has developed a model that predicts the likely evolution of variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Image: 3D illustration of red and elongated Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Why tuberculosis bacteria form long chains

25.10.2023

A researcher team from Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne led by Dr. Vivek Thacker now group leader at the Department of Infectious Diseases at Heidelberg University Hospital have studied why tuberculosis bacteria form long strands and how this affects their infectivity.
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Image: Abstract virus blood cells; Copyright: Malmö University

Malmö University

New sensors could replace current infection testing

04.10.2023

New technology could pave the way to a future of rapid testing in hospitals and at home for both covid and urinary tract infection. It could also be used to keep track of blood sugar levels during operations and wireless monitoring of various bacterial infections.
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Image: Close-up of a Covid test tube; Copyright: stetphotos

stetphotos

Rapid electronic diagnostic test for infectious diseases

04.10.2023

A new molecular test for bacteria and viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 has been developed by scientists at the University of Surrey, as they warn that the world needs to be prepared for the next pandemic.
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Image: Schematic structure of a sensor for the detection of viral pathogens; Copyright: TUD

TUD

Diagnostics: pioneering approaches for the detection of viral antigens

22.09.2023

Scientists from the Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology at TU Dresden (TUD) have made considerable progress in the development of highly innovative solutions for the detection of viral pathogens in two studies they presented recently.
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Image: Half-bald man with glasses in a dark jacket stands in the sunshine and smiles into the camera; Copyright: Ryan Hull

Ryan Hull

Pathogen detection through electronic detection of DNA nanoballs

19.09.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institute have developed a novel method using DNA Nanoballs to detect pathogens, aiming to simplify nucleic acid testing and revolutionize pathogen detection.
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Image: A bald man in a white coat stands in a laboratory and looks over at other people; Copyright: Joakim Palmqvist

Joakim Palmqvist

Advanced biosensors to detect tumors, viruses and bacterial diseases

06.09.2023

Linnaeus University is partnering with industry and healthcare to develop advanced biosensors, investing SEK 35 million in a project aimed at faster and cost-effective diagnoses of aggressive lung cancer, viral, and bacterial diseases, potentially enabling self-testing at home.
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Image: Judit Burgaya and Prof. Dr. Marco Galardini in the TWINCORE at a bar table with a laptop; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

How harmless turns dangerous

24.08.2023

MHH researcher Prof. Galardini from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence finds causes for bloodstream infections in the genes of bacteria. This will enable better diagnostics and vaccinations in the future.
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Image: X-ray image of a lung; Copyright: Shaiith

Shaiith

AI shows how Aspergillus fumigatus gets comfortable in the lungs

14.08.2023

Aspergillus fumigatus strains that infect humans have a significantly altered metabolism compared to other strains in the environment. At the same time, infection with the fungus leads to an apparent change in the human lung microbiome.
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Image: Uršula Vide from the Institute of Biochemistry at TU Graz working in the lab; Copyright: TU Graz

TU Graz

Light as on-off switch for enzymes

10.08.2023

Researchers at TU Graz have gained new insights into the functioning of a protein found in bacteria, whose enzymatic activity is activated by blue light.
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Image: Petri dish with bacterial cultures in laboratory; Copyright: felipecaparros

felipecaparros

Noninvasive technology tests for malaria without a blood sample

07.08.2023

A novel testing platform under development by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health (YSPH) and CytoAstra, LLC could provide a new noninvasive test for malaria that doesn’t require a blood sample.
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Image: Illustration: A new Scripps Research machine-learning system tracks how epidemic viruses evolve; Copyright: Imagery created using BioRender.com.

Imagery created using BioRender.com.

AI-based tracking and early-warning system for viral pandemics

27.07.2023

Scripps Research scientists have developed a machine-learning system—a type of artificial intelligence (AI) application—that can track the detailed evolution of epidemic viruses and predict the emergence of viral variants with important new properties.
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Image: The monitor uses a biosensor made with nanobodies that is integrated into an air sampler that operates based on the wet cyclone technology; Copyright: Joseph Puthussery

Joseph Puthussery

Biosensing: air monitor can detect COVID-19 variants

13.07.2023

Scientists are looking at ways to surveil indoor environments in real time for viruses. By combining recent advances in aerosol sampling technology and an ultrasensitive biosensing technique, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have created a real-time monitor that can detect any of the SARS-CoV-2 virus variants in a room in about 5 minutes.
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Image: A scientist in lab uniform inspects a smooth surface; Copyright: StreetOncamara_From_Twenty20

StreetOncamara_From_Twenty20

NOVA project: next generation of antimicrobial coating technologies

07.07.2023

Researchers develop and test highly efficient, environmentally friendly and stable antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal) coating technologies in the NOVA project.
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Image: Researcher Carles Mas and doctoral students Patricia López and Nerea García working with several samples as part of the Bio-TUNE project in a lab; Copyright: BarcelonaTech (UPC)

BarcelonaTech (UPC)

Medical implants: new generation of antibacterial materials

23.06.2023

The UPC’s Biomaterials, Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Group (BBT) leads the international project Bio-TUNE, which aims to develop multifunctional materials with high antibacterial potential and efficient tissue integration.
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Image: Micrograph of bacterial biofilms; Copyright: Buntan2019

Buntan2019

Biofilms: Infection model from the 3D printer

21.06.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) have developed a novel method to place biofilms on lung cells in the laboratory. The model system produced by means of "bioprinting" should help to better understand infection processes and assist in the development of new active substances.
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Image: Viral Microscope View. 3D illustration of a corona virus in blue color; Copyright: maxxyustas

maxxyustas

Corona: The virus needs only a single door opener

15.06.2023

Why is the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus able to spread so efficiently? Various hypotheses are still circulating in the scientific community. A group of researchers from Würzburg has now found groundbreaking answers.
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Image: Red 3D illustration of a human lungs on a black background; Copyright: Pixabay

Pixabay

Lung: bacterial colonisation also depends on genes of the host

13.06.2023

We know from previous studies that changes in the lung microbiome are associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Environmental factors such as smoking, nutrition in infancy or the use of antibiotics are important factors for the composition and stability of the microbial community in the lung.
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Image: Humboldt-Prof. Dr. Jens Meiler and Dr. Clara T. Schoeder analyse protein structures in front of a big screen; Copyright: Swen Reichhold

Swen Reichhold

Infectious diseases: digital 'vaccine library' against pandemics

12.06.2023

The Institute for Drug Discovery led by Humboldt Professor Jens Meiler is to receive 1.9 million dollars (1.77 million euros) for the development of vaccines. The international Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) will fund computer-aided vaccine development at Leipzig University with the aim of building a digital ‘vaccine library’ of components and virtual antigen designs.
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Image: Magnetic nanoparticles (red) bind specifically to the spherical bacteria (yellow) which are about 1 µm in size (electron microscopy digitally colored); Copyright: Empa

Empa

Antibiotics crisis: rapid test for sepsis with nanoparticles

09.06.2023

For Qun Ren, every minute counts. The Empa researcher and her team are currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can detect life-threatening blood poisoning caused by staphylococcus bacteria rapidly. This is because staphylococcal sepsis is fatal in up to 40 percent of the cases.
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Image: One man and two women posing for the camera with a building in the background; Copyright: Karolinska Institutet

Karolinska Institutet

New method reveals bacterial reaction to antibiotics in five minutes

26.05.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a molecular method able to detect whether or not bacteria respond to antibiotics within minutes.
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Image: Two men and a woman in a doctor's coat: the woman is holding a map of the world and the two men are pointing to Germany and Uzbekistan with a pen; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

With ultrasound against liver cancer

24.05.2023

The Hannover Medical School (MHH) enters into a clinic partnership with Uzbekistan and supports with a training program for sonography diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
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Image: The surface of a door handle is cleaned with disinfectant; Copyright: Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum

Ruhr-Universitaet-Bochum

Hygiene: monkeypox viruses relatively stable on surfaces

23.05.2023

A study conducted by the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, has shown that temperature is a major factor in this process: at room temperature, a monkeypox virus that is capable of replicating can survive on a stainless steel surface for up to eleven days, and at four degrees Celsius for up to a month.
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Image: A computer that evaluates stool samples using bioinformatic methods; Copyright: Anna Schroll/Leibniz-HKI

Anna Schroll/Leibniz-HKI

Model shows intestinal bacteria influence growth of fungi

22.05.2023

The bacteria present in the intestine provide information about the quantities of fungi of the potentially disease-causing Candida genus.
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Image: Close up of test tubes in a laboratory; Copyright: leungchopan

leungchopan

AI helps create better, simpler hepatitis, COVID-19 tests

11.05.2023

University of Florida scientists have used artificial intelligence tools to simplify a test that works for both hepatitis C and SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The simplified test happens in one small test tube in just a few minutes.
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Image: 3D-segmentation of different structures related to an infection with the Ebola virus.; Copyright: Petr Chlanda

Petr Chlanda

Luring the virus into a trap

04.05.2023

Heidelberg researchers describe mechanisms that could help prevent infections with the influenza A and Ebola viruses.
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Image: A Setup to conduct Optical Nanomotion Detection, b Optical image of E. coli bacteria. C. Same field of view as B in false colors; Copyright: Ines Villalba (EPFL)

Ines Villalba (EPFL)

Antibiotic resistance: fast, cheap, and easy test method

02.05.2023

“We have developed a technique in our laboratories that allows us to obtain an antibiogram within 2-4 hours – instead of the current 24 hours for the most common germs and one month for tuberculosis,” says Dr Sandor Kasas at EPFL.
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Image: Close up of both hands and forearms with characteristic monkeypox on a blue background; Copyright: Shutterstock.com/Marina Demidiuk

Shutterstock.com/Marina Demidiuk

App for AI-assisted detection of monkeypox skin lesions

07.04.2023

A paper produced as part of the DAKI-FWS project (data and AI-supported early warning system to stabilize the German economy) will be featured in the prestigious journal Nature Medicine.
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Image: Group picture in front of the BSL 3 high-security laboratory; Four women and three men in business attire; Copyright: Helmholtz Munich/Matthias Balk

Helmholtz Munich/Matthias Balk

Helmholtz Munich: research infrastructure for pandemic management and prevention expanded

05.04.2023

From now on, an improved research infrastructure for pandemic management and prevention will be available in the Greater Munich area: on the 29th of March 2023 a new biosafety level 3 laboratory was introduced at Helmholtz Munich.
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Image: Picture of the complete sensor with a PDMS well of 100 μl volume for the drop test; Copyright: HZDR/Sandoval Bojorquez

HZDR/Sandoval Bojorquez

Nanobiosensor developed for detecting SARS-CoV-2

04.04.2023

Infection and immunity status of the population are considered key parameters for handling pandemics. For this purpose, detecting antigens and antibodies is of great importance. The devices currently used for this purpose - what are known as point-of-care (POC) devices- are one option for rapid screening. Their sensitivity, however, needs further improvement.
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Image: Three women and a man are smiling and looking at their laptops while sitting in a library; Copyright: Uni Tübingen

Uni Tübingen

Targeted computer modelling to accelerate antiviral drug development

31.03.2023

Andreas Dräger from the University of Tübingen is working on a computer-based method that can help to accelerate the time-consuming identification and development of antiviral agents.
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Image: Close-up of a pregnancy belly, the woman is holding her hand on her belly; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH.

Karin Kaiser/MHH.

Better care for pregnant women with precancerous cervical cancer

23.03.2023

Preliminary stages of cervical cancer occur mainly in women between 25 and 35 years of age. The main risk factor for developing cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the treatment of choice.
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Image: Close-up of a scientist wearing protective clothing looking through a microscope; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Smart microscopy works out where to take the picture

16.03.2023

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a software solution for smart, data-driven microscopy, which makes this possible.
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Image: Logo of the EU project miGut-Health, black, violet and green colors on a white background; Copyright: Eurice Office

Eurice Office

Personalised health blueprint to prevent and predict inflammatory bowel disease

07.03.2023

Project led by PMI member Prof. Andre Franke aims to empower people affected by Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis by developing interdisciplinary solutions for improved disease prevention and health promotion.
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Image: Xing Xie is holding holding a chip in close up; Copyright: Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

New ultrafast water disinfection method is more environmentally friendly

27.02.2023

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have found a way to use small shocks of electricity to disinfect water, reducing energy consumption, cost, and environmental impact.
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Image: Illustration of the nanomaterial graphene with gold nano disks array; Copyright: NTNU

NTNU

Super quick COVID test uses new technology

13.02.2023

The ability of gold particles to reflect light in different colours is used in applications from stained glass to pregnancy tests. Now researchers are set to exploit the same properties in an ultra-fast sensor for the coronavirus.
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Image: A woman with black hair in a white coat sits in a research laboratory and operates a microscope; Copyright: wichayada69

wichayada69

Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials

08.02.2023

A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Image: The doctor treats the wound on the patient's leg in a clinic room; Copyright: Okrasyuk

Okrasyuk

Wound care: New spray fights infections and antibiotic resistance

07.02.2023

A group of researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden are presenting a new spray that can kill even antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and that can be used for wound care and directly on implants and other medical devices.
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Image: A man lies in a bed in front of the laptop and holds a pill case in his hand; Copyright: Iakobchuk

Iakobchuk

AI can help patients interpret home tests for COVID-19

03.02.2023

George Mason University researchers found that computerized symptom screenings can supplement at-home COVID-19 tests to better confirm the diagnosis for patients and clinicians.
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Bild: Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Bacterial electricity: Membrane potential influences antibiotic tolerance

27.01.2023

The electrical potential across the bacterial cell envelope indicates when bacteria no longer operate as individual cells but as a collective. Researchers at the University of Cologne's Institute for Biological Physics have discovered this connection between the electrical properties and the lifestyle of bacteria.
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Image: Dr Christoph Schultheiss determines blood values for Long COVID in the research laboratory; Copyright: Universitätsmedizin Halle

Universitätsmedizin Halle

Long COVID: blood values indicate reprogramming of immune cells

26.01.2023

The underlying mechanisms of long COVID are not yet fully understood. Molecular clues to different subgroups of long COVID have now been provided by a research group at University Medicine Halle.
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Bild: A research team of two works in the laboratory with a laptop. Analyzing the results; Copyright: Hoverstock

Hoverstock

Sequential antibiotic therapy in the laboratory and in patients

23.01.2023

Rapid switching between different antibiotics could prevent the evolution of resistance and lead to successful treatment of patients.
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Image: Researcher examines cell culture plates under the microscope; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

18.01.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
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Image: Test tubes with blood for checking antibodies in the fridge; Copyright: lorenzocapunata

lorenzocapunata

When antibodies do a pirouette

12.01.2023

Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg have developed a method for binding specific molecules in samples and serums, such as antibodies in the blood, to the surface of iron oxide particles thus allowing them to be identified using an inexpensive and compact detector.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt, Prof. Dan Yamin, writes a formula on a board; Copyright: Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University

Monitoring heart measures using smartwatches shows that Corona booster vaccine is safe

11.01.2023

The first study of its kind that used smartwatches to monitor the physiological data of close to 5,000 Israelis for two years found that: Monitoring heart measures using smartwatches shows that the Corona booster vaccine is safe and there is no evidence of unusual adverse events.
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Image: Doctor takes a sample for coronavirus testing from a subject's nose; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

COMPASS for highly sensitive rapid tests

09.01.2023

A newly developed rapid test needs only a few seconds to reliably detect pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2. It is based on specially designed magnetic nanoparticles.
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Image: A woman in a white coat with blue gloves sits at a large microscope; Copyright: LZH

LZH

Detecting bacterial infestation fast, contactless, and free of markers

05.01.2023

With a multimodal microscope, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and three partners in the joint project PriMe want to make it possible to detect bacterial infestation using fast, marker-free, and contactless imaging.
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Image: Microscopic image: The picture shows a textile fiber with salt crystals (light blue) and viruses around 100 nanometers in size (green); Copyright: Empa

Empa

Watching viruses fail

20.12.2022

Using a new analytical method, Empa researchers have tracked viruses as they pass through face masks and compared their failure on the filter layers of different types of masks.
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Image: A man with brown hair in a white coat, Ángel Serrano Aroca, smiles at the camera; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Asociación RUVID

Biomaterial capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections

15.12.2022

Researchers from the Bioengineering and Biomaterials Laboratory of Universidad Católica de Valencia (UCV) have developed a new porous material capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections at the same time.
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Image: An employee in protective clothing holds a piece of non-woven fabric in his hand and examines it; Copyright: Freudenberg Performance Materials

Freudenberg Performance Materials

ProQuIV optimizes the production of nonwoven masks

12.12.2022

Producing infection control clothing requires a lot of energy and uses lots of material resources. Fraunhofer researchers have now developed a technology which helps to save materials and energy when producing nonwovens.
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Image: Doctor and medical assistant at the bedside of a patient who has breathing problems and is wearing an oxygen mask; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Why some people get a more severe COVID-19 progression than others

22.08.2022

A team of scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) together with colleagues from the United Kingdom and Canada have found genes and proteins that contribute to a higher risk of severe COVID-19.
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Image: Cleaning staff at a hospital is wiping the floor of an OR; Copyright: karrastock

karrastock

Disinfection: Solutions to stop pathogens from spreading

02.05.2022

Disinfection and sterilization are the most reliable and best way to ensure patient safety in healthcare settings. Whether it is at the point of care when the patient is either at the hospital or medical practice, or wherever medical devices are manufactured and packaged in a sterile environment – the transmission of pathogens and microorganisms can have severe health impacts.
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Image: A room in a hospital with white floor, ceiling, walls and cabinets; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

Hygiene and sterilization: Hightech for clean surfaces

02.05.2022

Due to the Corona pandemic, a lot of attention is currently focused on the protective effect of medical masks. But especially in medical work areas, the protection against aerosol transmission is not enough, because a lot of pathogens can be transmitted trough direct contact with people or surfaces. Hygienic measures against contact infections like these are very costly, though.
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Image: Black, box-like device that directs a small, blue flame towards a light switch; Copyright: Fraunhofer IST/Paul Kurze

Fraunhofer IST/Paul Kurze

Cold plasma: Contactless disinfection of surfaces

02.05.2022

One of the most time-consuming tasks in hospitals is the manual cleaning and disinfection of high touch points and surfaces such as door handles, buttons, and switches. These are areas where microorganisms are spread by direct skin contact. The “MobDi – Mobile Disinfection” research project is developing a robot that automatically cleans and disinfects these areas. It will use cold plasma.
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Image: The Harmony COVID-19 test; Copyright: Mark Stone/University of Washington

Mark Stone/University of Washington

Fast and cheap test can detect COVID-19 virus' genome without need for PCR

25.01.2022

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new test for COVID-19 that combines the speed of over-the-counter antigen tests with the accuracy of PCR tests that are processed in medical labs and hospitals.
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Image: PD Dr. med. Arne Wieser and Prof. Dr. Christoph Haisch; Copytight: LMU University Hospital Munich

LMU University Hospital Munich

Room divider based on UV-C light inactivates SARS-CoV-2 aerosols

22.12.2021

Despite myriad precautionary measures, virus-contaminated aerosols still pose a serious problem indoors. An invisible protective wall of UV-C ligh could provide a solution and reliably curb the spread of viruses and other pathogens in rooms in the future while allowing total freedom of movement.
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Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01.10.2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: a robot arm transporting a petri dish; Copyright: PantherMedia / angellodeco

PantherMedia / angellodeco

The smart lab: The shift to more digitization is picking up speed

01.10.2021

They have probably never been in the spotlight as much as during the pandemic: laboratories. In Germany alone, around 73 million COVID-19-tests have been evaluated since the beginning of 2020. And even away from Corona, laboratory physicians have a lot to do – blood, urine and aspirates have to be evaluated every day. That results in an enormous amount of work, just in terms of organization.
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Image: A modern hospital room with two beds; Copyright: Tom Bauer/TU Braunschweig

Tom Bauer/TU Braunschweig

Patient room of the future comes to Braunschweig

22.06.2021

Architecture can prevent infections in hospitals. The walk-in model of a new type of patient room shows how this can be done. It was developed by a team from the fields of architecture, medicine and molecular biology in the KARMIN research project.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Mobile hygiene robot in the hospital – The cleaning force of the future

25.05.2021

One of the most time-consuming tasks in a hospital is the disinfection of often-used surfaces like light switches or door handles. This is especially important during the corona pandemic. The "DeKonBot" by Fraunhofer IPA could support hospital staff here in the future. Learn in our video interview with Dr. Birgit Graf how the robot works.
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Image: Simulation models of cough droplets falling to the ground in front of a person; Copyright: V. D'Alessandro, M. Falone, L. Giammichele, R. Ricci

V. D'Alessandro, M. Falone, L. Giammichele, R. Ricci

Irradiating COVID-19 cough droplets with UV-C lamps

16.03.2021

Using supercomputer numerical modeling of saliva droplets' diffusion produced by coughs, researchers in Italy explore deactivating COVID-19 virus particles via UV-C light.
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Image: A long hallway in a hospital with a lot of doors; Copyright: PantherMedia/dlpn

Disinfection: antibacterial coating on surfaces in the ICU

01.03.2021

All hospitalized patients are susceptible to contracting a nosocomial infection, with ICU patients being particularly at risk. The effects of these hospital-acquired infections are often more dangerous than the original reason for the in-patient hospitalization. The "PACMAN" project is now testing an antimicrobial coating for frequently used contact surfaces at high risk of pathogen transmission.
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Image: A hospital employee is cleaning an endoscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/sielemann

PantherMedia/sielemann

Medical devices: hygienic design combats pathogens

03.02.2021

Medical hygiene does not just play a key role during the COVID-19 pandemic. Preventing the transmission of infectious diseases and especially the spread of multidrug-resistant organisms is paramount even in non-pandemic times. While hygiene practices in hospitals and medical offices are essential, the industry can also make an important contribution with hygienic product design.
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Image: Prototype of the airlock; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBP

Fraunhofer IBP

Covid-19: protective canopy prevents infection

19.01.2021

The risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 is particularly high indoors. This is because, in addition to smear and droplet infection, infection via aerosols that accumulate and spread in the air is also possible there. Sufficient air exchange or air purification help to prevent this. The protective canopy developed by Fraunhofer IBP also follows such an approach.
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Image: A blue, box-shaped device with a handle and a nozzle; Copyright: 99Technologies S.A.

Disinfection: let mist do the work

02.11.2020

Healthcare settings require sharp weapons to fight both hospital-acquired infections and pathogens like SARS-CoV-2. Besides protective equipment, regular room disinfection is one of them. But they require time and are also prone to error if done manually. Fully automated solutions are needed to relief hospital staff from this exhausting work and perform it reliably. So, why not fog the room?
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Image: Researcher with gloves and protective suit is working at a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/EvgeniyShkolenko

BSL-4 laboratories: highest levels of safety and protection

01.04.2020

Laboratories are sectioned into four biosafety levels to dictate the precautions required to isolate dangerous biological agents. The highest level of biological safety, BSL-4, is perhaps the most well-known when we think of containing pathogens and microbes. However, the fewest number of laboratories actually fall into the BSL-4 category.
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Image: A female researcher with face mask, gloves and cap puts an object slide on a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

Laboratory work: the right personal protective equipment is crucial

01.04.2020

When working with infectious materials and organisms in the laboratory, safe handling and appropriate training are of utmost importance. Another central component is personal protective equipment designed to prevent contact with tissue, liquids and aerosols and protect the wearer.
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Image: Microscope next to a screen showing pictures of bacteria cultures; Copyright: PantherMedia/shmeljov

Laboratory safety: infection prevention in the work area

01.04.2020

What goes in, must not come out - and must also not cause harm to anyone working inside the lab. That's perhaps a nice way of summing up "laboratory safety" in one sentence - at least wherever pathogens are handled in biological and medical settings. The necessary laboratory safety precautions primarily depend on what is waiting "inside".
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Image: A researcher sits at a laboratory bench and puts gloves at his hands; Copyright: PantherMedia/dragana.stock@gmail.com

The safe laboratory – protection through technology

01.04.2020

When biomedical researchers or diagnosticians work with potentially contagious materials like cell cultures, blood or tissue, they need absolute protection from pathogens. Both safety measures in the workspace and the correct tools and materials are key here. Learn in our Topic of the Month what is important for protection in the lab and what a safe laboratory looks like.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Disinfection methods of hospital drinking water - Fully automatic legionella prevention

31.03.2020

Besides hand hygiene, drinking water hygiene is also on the to-do list of every hospital. A lot of money is invested to clean water pipes and to destroy legionella germs. An alternative solution for mechanical and thermal control is water disinfection using an automatic machine.
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Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23.03.2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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Image: patient with pain in fingers; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Milkos

APRICOT-project: implant "help(s) patients heal themselves"

01.01.2020

Today, people tend to live longer, while an increasing number of patients suffer from osteoarthritis. Even younger generations are now at a higher risk of getting osteoarthritis due to the frequent use of mobile devices. The EU research project APRICOT aims to develop a novel type of implant for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hands – helping patients heal themselves.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01.08.2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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