Imaging device for early gastrointestinal cancer detection
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Image: In the foreground, there is a transparent tiny mattress designed for newborns. The mattress is held by a man in a smock, wearing glasses; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Medical textiles and sensors enhance skin protection in healthcare

19.03.2024

In recent years, advancements in medical textiles and sensor technologies have brought about improvements in skin protection within the healthcare sector. From pressure-equalizing mattresses designed for newborns to intelligent sensor systems aimed at preventing pressure injuries in adults, these inventions have the potential to improve patient care and enhance overall well-being.
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Determine stroke risk early with tear fluid, mitochondria and AI

08.03.2024

Over 100 million people globally suffer from strokes annually, with ischemic strokes being the most common. However, many strokes go undetected, leading to severe consequences like dementia or depression. Prof. Olga Golubnitschaja from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) has spearheaded a comprehensive approach to assess stroke risk early, focusing on predictive medicine.
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The photo shows a hand holding a silver, tubular device which improves imaging and detecting gastrointestinal cancer; Copyright: J. Crowley

J. Crowley

Imaging device for early gastrointestinal cancer detection

01.03.2024

Gastrointestinal cancers (GCs) pose a significant health challenge worldwide, with early detection being crucial for effective treatment and improved survival rates. To address this need, scientists have developed a new imaging device aimed at enhancing the accuracy and accessibility of GC screening programs.
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Image: Nasal spray and stethoscope lie on a wooden table

Nasal antibody spray demonstrates potential for COVID-19 prevention

26.01.2024

Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have achieved a significant breakthrough in COVID-19 prevention with the development of a nasal antibody spray. This approach offers new possibilities for enhanced protection against SARS-CoV-2 and its various variants, providing hope for high-risk individuals.
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Image: Surgical staff bend over a patient in the operating room; Copyright: DragonImages

DragonImages

Exoskeletons in the operating room

16.01.2024

Exoskeletons have made their way into the workforce. With their capability to relieve muscles while still maintaining agility, they make a welcome support for employees across industries. In the medical sector, exoskeletons are mostly being used for rehabilitation. But there is a field of use that could benefit from exoskeletons in the future: the operating room.
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Image: Eye test, machine and a woman for optometric assistance, retinal scanning or optical surgery in a clinic.; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

Eye scans provide crucial insights into kidney health

08.12.2023

3D eye scans can reveal vital clues about kidney health that could help to track the progression of disease, research suggests. The advance could revolutionise monitoring of kidney disease, which often progresses without symptoms in the early stages.
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Image: Rebecca Richards-Kortum smiles at the camera in a lab; Copyright: Brandon Martin/Rice University

Brandon Martin/Rice University

Affordable global health technologies for early cancer detection

06.11.2023

A Rice University-led collaboration from three continents has won up to a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to establish a premier research center in the Texas Medical Center to develop affordable, effective point-of-care (POC) technologies that improve early cancer detection in low-resource settings in the United States and other countries.
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Image: A woman sits on a prototype of an optimized office chair; Copyright: TU Dresden

TU Dresden

Sensor and software to promote office staff’s physical activity

11.10.2023

TU Dresden researchers have analyzed the mechanics of office chairs and developed a sensor that, in combination with a dedicated software, can in the future help employees move more and more consciously during office work.
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Image: A woman hands a yellow piece of paper to a man across a table where another person is also sitting; Copyright: InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics study: Benefits of on-site tests in general practices

05.09.2023

General practitioners (GP) regularly use on-site rapid tests because they find their application useful. However, frequent utilisation fails due to costs and remuneration regulations. These are the results of a study by InfectoGnostics researchers at the University Hospital Jena in the project "POCT-ambulant", in which 292 GPs in Thuringia, Bremen and Bavaria participated.
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Image: A woman in personal protective clothing examines samples under a microscope; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Pandemic prevention: progress in research infrastructure

15.08.2023

The Covid-19 pandemic has clearly shown that there is still a lot of potential in research structures and funding to better manage a pandemic. Prevention plays just as important a role as dealing with the pandemic. Technological measures that can facilitate virus detection or help to analyze the course in more detail need to be developed.
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Image: Michal Rawlik (left), first author of the publication, and Marco Stampanoni pose at a table in an office space; Copyright: Paul Scherrer Institut

Paul Scherrer Institut

Improvement of the CT: earlier detection of breast cancer

26.07.2023

A team of researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich, together with the Baden Cantonal Hospital (KSB) and the University Hospital Zurich (USZ), has succeeded in refining mammography, x-ray imaging technique used to detect tumours in their early stages, to produce considerably more reliable results and be less unpleasant for the patient.
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Image: A mammologist feels the lymph nodes in a patient's armpits; Copyright: Zinkevych_D

Zinkevych_D

Breast cancer: international expert recommendations on removal of lymph nodes

24.07.2023

Researchers from Heidelberg University Hospital and the University of Lucerne as well as international scientists, patient representatives and European cancer societies have pooled scientific data and their expert knowledge on the surgical management of lymph nodes in breast cancer.
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Image:An ophthalmologist looking at an OCT image together with the patient; Copyright: olgaseleznovaphoto

olgaseleznovaphoto

FALCO project: Comprehensive glaucoma prevention thanks to low-cost screening system

20.04.2023

Glaucoma is wicked, because the disease often goes undetected until irreversible damage of the optic nerve has occurred. This makes regular eye exams even more important. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an imaging method that facilitates an early diagnosis. However, traditional OCT machines are very expensive. That’s why the FALCO project aims to develop a more cost-effective system.
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Image: Prof Asma Khalil using portable ultrasound device on patient; Copyright: St George's, University of London

St George's, University of London

Extra pregnancy scan slashes number of breech births and risk to babies

14.04.2023

Adding a third routine scan at the end of pregnancy can slash the number of unexpected breech births by 70% and the risks of the baby being born with severe health complications, according to research led by doctors at St George’s, University of London, and published in PLOS Medicine.
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Image: Someone playing a memory game on the smartphone; Copyright: beta-web | memodio GmbH

beta-web

Dementia prevention with memodio – app helps fend off memory loss

03.04.2023

Globally, 55 million persons are effected by dementia. The neurodegenerative disease is a chronic condition. Once the decline in brain function has started, it is difficult to stop it, thus underscoring the importance of prevention. This is where memodio comes into play. The app is designed to help people with cognitive training and prevent dementia.
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Image: The SPUR tool, a plastic dispenser, can help patients living with Type 2 Diabetes take their medications correctly; Copyright: Kingston University

Kingston University

Medication adherence tool predicts hospital admissions of Type 2 Diabetes patients

28.03.2023

A pioneering behavioural diagnostic tool developed by Kingston University, London and healthcare technology company Observia to help patients take their medication as prescribed is the first holistic model in the world to accurately predict hospital admissions and readmissions in people living with Type 2 Diabetes, according to a new study.
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Image: Close-up of a pregnancy belly, the woman is holding her hand on her belly; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH.

Karin Kaiser/MHH.

Better care for pregnant women with precancerous cervical cancer

23.03.2023

Preliminary stages of cervical cancer occur mainly in women between 25 and 35 years of age. The main risk factor for developing cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Surgery is the treatment of choice.
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Image: A pregnant woman getting her blood pressure measured; Copyright: dasha11

dasha11

SMART Start: Digitization in prenatal care

16.01.2023

Pregnancy means many prenatal visits. Regularly scheduled checkup appointments are important to help expectant mothers get ready for the healthiest pregnancy possible. The question is: Could some parameters be measured and monitored via smart devices from the comfort of one’s own home? The SMART Start project explores this issue.
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Image: A dark-skinned pregnant woman is sitting on a couch during video chat with a female physician; Copyright: AnnaStills

AnnaStills

Pregnancy: Digital care is here

16.01.2023

The demands of pregnancy are not easy on the expectant mother’s body. Although most pregnancies occur without complications, some women may experience health conditions or problems. Modern technologies are available to provide maternity care and are great resources to prevent problems during this important time.
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Image: Two doctors in scrubs look at a screen during an AI-assisted colonoscopy; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

AI improves colorectal cancer screening in Lynch syndrome

10.01.2023

Researchers at the National Center for Hereditary Tumor Diseases (NZET) at Bonn University Hospital (UKB) have now found that artificial intelligence (AI) can improve the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the presence of Lynch syndrome.
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Image: Nurse is caring for a surgical wound at the leg of a patient; Copyright: DegrooteStock

DegrooteStock

Wound care: healing with technology

01.12.2022

Wound care by nurses is directly about cleaning, sterile covering, and documentation. Medical and surgical interventions may also be necessary. In this context, wound care also offers potential for the use of technical aids that can help prevent complications.
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Image: An elderly person is fitted with a modern hearing aid; Copyright: halfpoint

halfpoint

Novel sensor system with AI-driven biomarkers for patients with heart failure

07.10.2022

UNISONO aims to develop a novel system combining an ear-worn sensor with speech recognition.
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Image: A woman with glasses and white hair is solving some tasks on a sheet of paper; Copyright: PantherMedia/microgen

PantherMedia/happysuthida

Dementia: "We want to achieve earlier diagnosis for more people"

29.03.2022

As we get older, we tend to become more forgetful, sometimes strange or even confused and overwhelmed by everyday life. But is it always just the age? With an increasing lifespan, the possibility to suffer from a cognitive disease at one point is also increasing. The majority of cognitive diseases is never diagnosed.
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Image: PASPORT, a new saliva-based COVID-19 ART test; Copyright: Duke-NUS Medical School

Duke-NUS Medical School

COVID-19 saliva Amplified Antigen Rapid Test is as sensitive as PCR test

09.12.2021

A potentially game-changing Antigen Rapid Test (ART) technology to diagnose COVID-19 has been developed by scientists in Singapore. Using a proprietary on-kit amplification technique, a person's saliva can be self-administered or tested for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Image: The new procedure is intended to detect the causes of back problems more efficiently; Copyright: SZB

SZB

Back problems: AI will provide personalised diagnosis

02.11.2021

Back problems are generally regarded as a widespread disease with many sufferers struggling with pain. A team of researchers from TU Kaiserslautern, the University Medical Centre in Mainz and several companies is working on a method that will enable more efficient monitoring of malpositions and strains on the back. Artificial intelligence methods are also being used.
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Image: Professor Dr Peter Hillemanns and PD Dr Matthias Jentschke with the HPV self-tests; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Prevention of cervical cancer with HPV self-testing

28.10.2021

Cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases of the female reproductive organs. Human papilloma viruses are almost always responsible for cervical cancer and the corresponding precancerous lesions. As part of the statutory preventive medical check-up, women from the age of 20 can have a cell smear taken from the cervix once a year, the so-called Pap test, to detect cell changes.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt is sitting at his desks and performs stretching exercises; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Pipov

PantherMedia/Andriy Pipov

Everyday physical activity: out of shape thanks to the Corona pandemic?

22.09.2021

Social distancing, working from home, limited social activities: the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted many people to become more inactive, sedentary, and therefore more susceptible to ailments. Simple fitness programs and regular exercises can help counteract the negative effects of inertness. And paradoxical as it may sound, the pandemic also gives us the chance to get moving again.
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Image: Person on a treadmill wears a smart watch which shows his or her heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/apid

More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

01.09.2021

Wearables are increasingly being used in sports medicine, for example, to prevent injuries or to provide users individually with real-time data about their fitness and health. By analyzing this data, risks for sports injuries can be identified early and training can be customized to the user's needs and goals.
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Image: A female runner is kneeling at the roadside and using her smartwatch; Copyright: PantherMedia/I_am_Daniel

PantherMedia/I_am_Daniel

Running: how to prevent injuries with sensors and AI

01.09.2021

The most common injury that affects runners stems from overuse, not falls. Early warning signs include changes in motion. Successful injury prevention could pick up on this aspect by detecting and responding to these deviations at an early stage. It is the focus of the "Smart Injury Prevention" project.
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Image: Cell phone displays diabetes management data in an app; Copyright: PantherMedia / VIVOOO

How to Successfully Advance Digital Health Applications

03.05.2021

The benefits of digital health applications are numerous and include the flexibility to self-monitor your illness from home with a mobile device. One caveat: Digital health applications must abide by technical and legal frameworks to be recognized as such.
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Image: disinfection of a door handle around which coronaviruses are flying; Copyright: PantherMedia/AntonMatyukha

Necessity is the mother of invention – innovations in the corona pandemic

01.03.2021

Keeping your distance, washing your hands, wearing a mask – such protective measures have been the order of the day since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began. But appropriate products or procedures are not suitable for everyone, are often unavailable or, despite everything, carry a residual risk. The need for new, better solutions is high. But necessity is the mother of invention.
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Hygiene and disinfection: innovations against Covid-19

01.03.2021

When urgently needed products such as masks become scarce or conventional disinfection processes reach their limits, inventiveness is called for. And there is usually plenty of it in times of crisis. What innovations has the current corona pandemic already produced? How can they supplement or even replace existing products and processes?
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Image: Pharmacist with the transparent mask miama; Copyright: iuvas medical GmbH

Miama: transparent face mask uncovers facial expressions

01.03.2021

Over 50% of our communication is made up of facial expressions and gestures. Nonverbal communication is especially important to deaf or hearing-impaired people or people with dementia. A conventional mask makes this more difficult, may promote miscommunication and contribute to medical errors in extreme cases. Yet it is paramount to use a mask amid this pandemic. Miama helps solve this problem.
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Image: Self-disinfecting mask and associated battery are held up to the camera; Copyright: ZHAW/Hannes Heinzer

ZHAW/Hannes Heinzer

Self-disinfecting mask: germ-free at the push of a button

08.02.2021

Disinfection and masks are essential to prevent the spread of Covid-19. Swiss scientists from ZHAW and Osmotex AG have now combined the two and developed a mask that disinfects itself at the push of a button. It is to be launched on the market as early as this spring.
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Image: Patient in the intensive care unit; Copyright: PantherMedia/halfpoint

PantherMedia/halfpoint

Biostatistics: using data and models to fight Covid-19

27.01.2021

We are all familiar with these images from some countries: Completely full intensive care units, doctors working frantically despite being ill, being forced to decide who lives and who dies due to critical shortages of respirators. How can you forecast Covid-19 impact on healthcare systems to avoid overload? Biostatistician Professor Frank Klawonn studies this issue.
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Fraunhofer IBP

Covid-19: protective canopy prevents infection

19.01.2021

The risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2 is particularly high indoors. This is because, in addition to smear and droplet infection, infection via aerosols that accumulate and spread in the air is also possible there. Sufficient air exchange or air purification help to prevent this. The protective canopy developed by Fraunhofer IBP also follows such an approach.
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Image: woman holding an asthma inhaler in one hand and a smartphone in the other; Copyright: PantherMedia/microgen

Asthma: Self-management thanks to apps and wearables

11.01.2021

Today, managing one's own chronic disease is hardly possible without digital helpers – not least because of the corona pandemic. People with asthma also benefit from apps and wearables. They help patients connect better with doctors and better understand their own disease. Our Topic of the Month looks at why this is so important and what the digital services can do.
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Image: Microscope next to a screen showing pictures of bacteria cultures; Copyright: PantherMedia/shmeljov

Laboratory safety: infection prevention in the work area

01.04.2020

What goes in, must not come out - and must also not cause harm to anyone working inside the lab. That's perhaps a nice way of summing up "laboratory safety" in one sentence - at least wherever pathogens are handled in biological and medical settings. The necessary laboratory safety precautions primarily depend on what is waiting "inside".
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Image: Heart symbols are floating over a smartphone in the hand of a physician; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Digital cardiology: analyzing data beat by beat

03.02.2020

Chronic cardiovascular diseases are a growing burden worldwide. Most of them are diseases of civilization that spread, where lifestyle is improving or where it is good already. But the healthcare systems are not growing equally to keep up with this development. We can make up for this by making cardiological care smarter with eHealth and mHealth.
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Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01.07.2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08.02.2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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