Technology against organ shortage
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VisioPrinTech: 3D-printed Cornea to restore eyesight

21.06.2024

The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in collaboration with Carl Zeiss Meditec AG and Evonik Healthcare, developed a method to restore eyesight by printing a new cornea during surgery using a laser-based process with personalized bioink. The "VisioPrinTech" process addresses corneal disorders, common among the aging population.
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Image: Pediatrician examines newborn baby in a bed in a clinic; Copyright: Lobachad

Lobachad

Enhancing neonatal intensive care with ArtPlac project

19.01.2024

The European Union is providing €3.57 million in funding for the "ArtPlac" research project, aimed at developing innovative medical technology for the treatment of premature and newborn infants in neonatal intensive care.
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Image: Human organs made of paper lie on a table with the word

FabianMontano

Organ banks and the potential of deep-freezing

28.11.2023

We still face major challenges when it comes to the availability of donor organs. Organ banks could be a promising solution to shorten waiting times and save more lives - but only if we manage to preserve donor organs for longer.
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Image: Dr Bastian Schmack (left) and Professor Dr Arjang Ruhparwar demonstrate how the plastic bag of reBEAT encloses the heart; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

The most natural form of mechanical cardiac support?

26.10.2023

On the road to gentler mechanical cardiac support, the cardiac surgery clinics of Hannover Medical School (MHH) and the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle upon Tyne (UK) have briefly implanted a novel, groundbreaking circulatory support system in the first five people with advanced heart failure in the world.
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Image: A person in a white t-shirt is holding an anatomical model of the kidney in front of their abdomen; Copyright: PantherMedia/benschonewille

PantherMedia/benschonewille

Technology against organ shortage – Support for the successful transplant

03.02.2022

The waiting time for a donor organ is long nowadays since the need for organs vastly exceeds their availability. But we have possibilities to improve the situation and help as many people as possible to survive despite organ failure: Some organ functions can already be substituted by technology. But medicine is also researching ways to make more organs available for transplant.
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Image: Image showing part of an ECMO machine – a square part through which blood is channeled; Copyright: PantherMedia/Richmanphoto

PantherMedia/Richmanphoto

COPD: How long before the implantable lung is here?

03.01.2022

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is often a last resort treatment for patients with acute respiratory failure. The method uses an external pump to circulate blood through an artificial lung back into the bloodstream. However, the use of ECMO for long-term support is not possible for patients with chronic respiratory failure.
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Image: A normothermic perfusion machine; Copyright: Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Machine Perfusion: Increasing the Safety of Marginal Organ Transplants

03.01.2022

The shortage of donor organs is a major global issue. An aging population, a reluctance towards organ donation, and logistical challenges related to organ shipping play an important role in this setting. Machine perfusion can be a way to expand and preserve the donor pool for eligible transplant recipients.
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Image: Man with a bare upper-body is showing an implanted cardiac support system; Copyright: PantherMedia/NikD51

PantherMedia/NikD51

Donor organs: Solving the shortage with technology

03.01.2022

Patients waiting for a donor organ must have a lot of patience and a bit of luck. Aging and a rise in chronic disease prevalence means the need for donor organs is much greater than the number that is available. To help those who need organ transplants, scientists must create new technologies.
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Tissue Engineering and Bioprinting – From artificial heart valves and printed humans

27.01.2021

Drug research and artificial skin replacement - these are the areas in which tissue engineering and bioprinting are already used today. What else could be possible in the future? We asked Dr. Nadine Nottrodt from Fraunhofer ILT and Prof. Sabine Neuß-Stein from RWTH Aachen University Hospital!
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Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01.12.2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23.09.2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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