Multiple sclerosis: Myelin may be detrimental to nerve fibres
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Image: Two people in white coats look at a monitor displaying data on genetic material; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Heart health: New tool developed to investigate telomere length

10.06.2024

A research team from Hannover Medical School (MHH) has developed a new molecular tool to investigate the influence of telomerase on the development of heart muscle cells. This study could have significant implications for the treatment and prevention of heart diseases.
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Image: Scientist pipettes cells into a test tube in a a laboratory setting

New findings on short-term cultivated CAR T cells in cancer treatment

28.05.2024

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T (CAR T) cells are a breakthrough in immunotherapy, offering hope for blood cancer patients who have exhausted other options. These genetically modified cells are designed to attack cancer cells by recognizing specific antigens. The therapy has shown promise, particularly in treating B-cell leukemias and lymphomas.
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Image: In the foreground, there is a testing sample held by a tweezer. In the background, a woman is looking at the sample; Copyright: HZDR / Anja Schneider

HZDR / Anja Schneider

HZDR team introduces novel pathogen detection approach

12.03.2024

Detecting diseases early or predicting their onset is crucial for healthcare. Dr. Larysa Baraban's team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) develops miniaturized biosensor devices using nanomaterials.
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Image: Two women looking at a display of cells on a monitor; Copyright: University of Jyväskylä

University of Jyväskylä

Antiviral resin destroys COVID-19 from plastic surfaces

06.02.2024

Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland are pioneering the development of antiviral surfaces to mitigate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly focusing on coronaviruses.
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Image: A woman in a blue lab coat sticks a patch on the arm of a young girl, both wearing a mask

Microneedle array patches: vaccinations made easy

29.01.2024

Dissolvable microneedle array patches (MAPs) consist of tiny, rapidly dissolving needles that can efficiently deliver vaccines into the skin. Their stability over time and easy application gives them great potential to not only simplify the vaccination process during a pandemic, but also in increase vaccination rates in low- and middle-income countries.
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Image: Nasal spray and stethoscope lie on a wooden table

Nasal antibody spray demonstrates potential for COVID-19 prevention

26.01.2024

Researchers at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have achieved a significant breakthrough in COVID-19 prevention with the development of a nasal antibody spray. This approach offers new possibilities for enhanced protection against SARS-CoV-2 and its various variants, providing hope for high-risk individuals.
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Image: A high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP) up close; Copyright: UQ

UQ

Protecting against zika virus with a microarray patch

22.01.2024

In the global fight against the Zika virus, researchers are developing a vaccine patch that promises an effective and painless solution. This needle-free vaccine patch, utilizing the high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP).
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Image: AI-based segmentation of melanoma metastases in a tumor; Copyright: USZ

USZ

Understanding and fighting tumors better with new algorithms

21.12.2023

The University Hospital Zurich, the University of Zurich and the diagnostics company Roche are expanding their collaboration in cancer research. In the fully digitalized Morphomolecular Pathology Laboratory, they are developing algorithms that can further improve the effectiveness of immunotherapies.
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Image: Close-up of a vaccination on a woman's arm; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

Coronavirus: Model can predict the evolution of new variants

31.10.2023

An international research team from the University of Cologne and the Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai (New York) has developed a model that predicts the likely evolution of variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Image: In the study, the researchers investigated the thymus using CT at the Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization; Copyright: Charlotte Perhammar/Linköping University

Charlotte Perhammar/Linköping University

CT scan can reveal immune system ageing

20.10.2023

With age, the glandular tissue in the thymus is replaced by fat, but, according to a new study from Linköping University, the rate at which this happens is linked to sex, age and lifestyle factors.
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Image: Blue immune cells wandering from bottom to top on a black background; Copyright: Jonna Alanko/Science Immunology

Jonna Alanko/Science Immunology

How immune cells migrate

11.09.2023

When fighting disease, our immune cells need to reach their target quickly. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) now discovered that immune cells actively generate their own guidance system to navigate through complex environments.
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Image: Close-up of two hands in blue gloves preparing a dose of vaccine by syringe; Copyright: Beate Armbruster/University Hospital of Tuebingen

Beate Armbruster/University Hospital of Tuebingen

Protection for cancer patients

05.09.2023

Tübingen T-cell activator offers protection against coronaviruses in immunocompromised patients
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Image: A woman hands a yellow piece of paper to a man across a table where another person is also sitting; Copyright: InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics study: Benefits of on-site tests in general practices

05.09.2023

General practitioners (GP) regularly use on-site rapid tests because they find their application useful. However, frequent utilisation fails due to costs and remuneration regulations. These are the results of a study by InfectoGnostics researchers at the University Hospital Jena in the project "POCT-ambulant", in which 292 GPs in Thuringia, Bremen and Bavaria participated.
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Image: Two men and a woman in white coats work in a laboratory with reaction vessels; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

More impact against cancer

04.09.2023

MHH molecular physician Professor Dr. Dr. Schambach wants to use genetically modified natural killer cells to find new therapeutic options against three particularly malignant cancers. The EU is funding the project with 3.8 million euros
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Image: A starch implant photographed in microscopic image; Copyright: Uni Halle / Esfahani Golbarg

Uni Halle / Esfahani Golbarg

Pharmacy: Using starch as a novel drug transporter?

30.08.2023

A special type of starch could soon be used as an excipient in medicine to improve the treatment of patients.
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Image: A man and woman pose seated with a dummy syringe that says

Anne Günther/Uni Jena

Timing is key in cortisone treatment of inflammation

30.08.2023

A special type of starch could soon be used as an excipient in medicine to improve the treatment of patients.
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Image: The team at the Institute of PharmaceuticalMicrobiology: Three women and a man in white coats smile for the camera; Copyright: Gregor Hübl/University of Bonn

Gregor Hübl/University of Bonn

Researchers decode new antibiotic

29.08.2023

Cooperation between the University of Bonn, the USA and the Netherlands cracks the mode of action of clovibactin
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Image: Healthy food. Fresh vegetables, fruits, meat and fish on the table. View from above; Copyright: LanaSweet

LanaSweet

Research gives new insights into fighting antimicrobial resistance

25.08.2023

Cooking food thoroughly and avoiding some types of vegetables and salad during a course of antibiotic treatment could potentially reduce antibiotic resistance, by preventing bacteria carrying resistance genes getting into the gut, according to a new study.
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Image: Close-up of microtiter plates that are filled with several pipettes; Copyright: LMU

LMU

Immunotherapy: Antibody kit to fight tumors

25.08.2023

A new study highlights the potential of artificial DNA structures that, when fitted with antibodies, instruct the immune system to specifically target cancerous cells.
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Image: Immune cells in blue and vessels in pink in the bone marrow of the skull; Copyright: Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

A new ally in fighting brain diseases: our very own skull

16.08.2023

Alzheimer's, stroke, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases cause severe damage due to neuroinflammation mediated by immune cells.
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Image: A woman in personal protective clothing examines samples under a microscope; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Pandemic prevention: progress in research infrastructure

15.08.2023

The Covid-19 pandemic has clearly shown that there is still a lot of potential in research structures and funding to better manage a pandemic. Prevention plays just as important a role as dealing with the pandemic. Technological measures that can facilitate virus detection or help to analyze the course in more detail need to be developed.
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Image: X-ray image of a lung; Copyright: Shaiith

Shaiith

AI shows how Aspergillus fumigatus gets comfortable in the lungs

14.08.2023

Aspergillus fumigatus strains that infect humans have a significantly altered metabolism compared to other strains in the environment. At the same time, infection with the fungus leads to an apparent change in the human lung microbiome.
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Image:Upon irradiation by near infra-red light, Anti-PD-L1 specifically binds to the cancer cell, while immunostimulants activate T and dendritic cells; Copyright: Eijiro Miyako from JAIST

Eijiro Miyako from JAIST

Cancer photoimmunotherapy: novel liquid metal nanoparticles

10.08.2023

JAIST researchers create liquid metal nanoparticles (PEG-IMIQ-LM) for cancer treatment, merging photothermal therapy and immunotherapy. Disintegration delivers immunomodulants and tracks cancer cells in real-time. Immune checkpoint inhibitor enhances cancer removal. Promising for future cancer theranostics, with clinical trials anticipated in a decade.
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Image: Cross-sectional electron micrographs of individual nerve fibers in MS brain biopsies; Axons sheathed with myelin showing increasingly damage ; Copyright: Leipzig University

Leipzig University

Multiple sclerosis: Myelin may be detrimental to nerve fibres

05.07.2023

Researchers at Leipzig University and Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have discovered that myelin, which was previously thought to be solely protective, can actually threaten the survival of the axons.
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Image: Child being tested for viruses in the throat by a doctor using a test swab; Copyright: drazenphoto

drazenphoto

Revolutionizing virus detection: the power of AI and CRISPR

04.07.2023

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists and researchers have been tirelessly working to develop innovative and accurate tests to identify the presence of viruses. One breakthrough technology that has emerged is the combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and CRISPR, which has revolutionized virus detection.
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Image: A puzzle-like model of a lung made of building blocks on a red background; Copyright: yavdat

yavdat

AI enables first integrated single-cell atlas of the lung

15.06.2023

Can a human organ be mapped on a single-cell level to learn more about each individual cell? And can we learn how different these cells are from person to person? Helmholtz Munich researchers and their collaborators have taken up this challenge and developed the Human Lung Cell Atlas using artificial intelligence (AI)-based techniques.
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Image: Red 3D illustration of a human lungs on a black background; Copyright: Pixabay

Pixabay

Lung: bacterial colonisation also depends on genes of the host

13.06.2023

We know from previous studies that changes in the lung microbiome are associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Environmental factors such as smoking, nutrition in infancy or the use of antibiotics are important factors for the composition and stability of the microbial community in the lung.
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Image: Micrograph: Certain immune cells called microglia (yellow) remove amyloid plaques (magenta) in the brain of an Alzheimer's mouse; Copyright: MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

Dementia: poorly insulated nerve cells promote Alzheimer's disease in old age

08.06.2023

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have shown that defective myelin actively promotes disease-related changes in Alzheimer’s. Slowing down age-related myelin damage could open up new ways to prevent the disease or delay its progression in the future.
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Image: A computer that evaluates stool samples using bioinformatic methods; Copyright: Anna Schroll/Leibniz-HKI

Anna Schroll/Leibniz-HKI

Model shows intestinal bacteria influence growth of fungi

22.05.2023

The bacteria present in the intestine provide information about the quantities of fungi of the potentially disease-causing Candida genus.
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Image: Close up of test tubes in a laboratory; Copyright: leungchopan

leungchopan

AI helps create better, simpler hepatitis, COVID-19 tests

11.05.2023

University of Florida scientists have used artificial intelligence tools to simplify a test that works for both hepatitis C and SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The simplified test happens in one small test tube in just a few minutes.
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Image: 3D-segmentation of different structures related to an infection with the Ebola virus.; Copyright: Petr Chlanda

Petr Chlanda

Luring the virus into a trap

04.05.2023

Heidelberg researchers describe mechanisms that could help prevent infections with the influenza A and Ebola viruses.
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Image: A Setup to conduct Optical Nanomotion Detection, b Optical image of E. coli bacteria. C. Same field of view as B in false colors; Copyright: Ines Villalba (EPFL)

Ines Villalba (EPFL)

Antibiotic resistance: fast, cheap, and easy test method

02.05.2023

“We have developed a technique in our laboratories that allows us to obtain an antibiogram within 2-4 hours – instead of the current 24 hours for the most common germs and one month for tuberculosis,” says Dr Sandor Kasas at EPFL.
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Image: Daniel Aili, professor at the Department of Physics, man with brown hair and glasses, smiles at the camera; Copyright: Magnus Johansson

Magnus Johansson

Wound dressing reveals infection

26.04.2023

A nanocellulose wound dressing that can reveal early signs of infection without interfering with the healing process has been developed by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
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Image: Three women and a man are smiling and looking at their laptops while sitting in a library; Copyright: Uni Tübingen

Uni Tübingen

Targeted computer modelling to accelerate antiviral drug development

31.03.2023

Andreas Dräger from the University of Tübingen is working on a computer-based method that can help to accelerate the time-consuming identification and development of antiviral agents.
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Image: Study co-authors in white coats (from left) Caleb Bashor, Antonios Mikos and Letitia Chim; Copyright: Gustavo Raskosky/Rice University

Gustavo Raskosky/Rice University

Upgraded tumor model optimizes search for cancer therapies

27.03.2023

Rice University researchers developed an upgraded tumor model that houses osteosarcoma cells beside immune cells known as macrophages inside a three-dimensional structure engineered to mimic bone. Using the model, bioengineer Antonios Mikos and collaborators found that the body’s immune response can make tumor cells more resistant to chemotherapy.
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Image: Close-up of a female hand holding the orange ribbon symbolizing the fight against leukemia; Copyright: JoPanwatD

JoPanwatD

AI finds targets for CAR-T cell therapy against acute myeloid leukemia

20.03.2023

Unlike other forms of blood cancer, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cannot currently be treated with CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The reason is that specific molecular targets with which certain immune cells could specifically target AML cells are lacking, which would permit the immune system to attack cancer.
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Image: Close-up of a scientist wearing protective clothing looking through a microscope; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Smart microscopy works out where to take the picture

16.03.2023

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a software solution for smart, data-driven microscopy, which makes this possible.
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Image: Microscopic image: Mouse lymph nodes with colored fluorescent markers; Copyright: AG Hoelzel/UKB

AG Hoelzel/UKB

Artificial intelligence to help tumor immunology

09.03.2023

Developing methods to predict the nature of the tumor microenvironment is the goal of researchers from the Clusters of Excellence ImmunoSensation2 and the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics (HCM) led by Prof. Kevin Thurley at the University of Bonn.
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Image: Logo of the EU project miGut-Health, black, violet and green colors on a white background; Copyright: Eurice Office

Eurice Office

Personalised health blueprint to prevent and predict inflammatory bowel disease

07.03.2023

Project led by PMI member Prof. Andre Franke aims to empower people affected by Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis by developing interdisciplinary solutions for improved disease prevention and health promotion.
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Image: The photo shows the scanning of a blood sample in a laboratory at CiiM.; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

What leads to severe COVID-19 diseases?

01.03.2023

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 leads to severe disease in some people, while others do not get ill or only experience mild disease. But why is this the case? Unfortunately, we do not know exactly. We do know that an overactive innate immune system is causing severe COVID-19 disease, but it is unclear how this is regulated.
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Image: Two men in dark clothes posing in front of the experimental station Alvra of the Swiss X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL; Copyright: Paul Scherrer Institut/Markus Fischer

Paul Scherrer Institut/Markus Fischer

Using light to switch drugs on and off

27.02.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: Researchers at HIPS work with zebrafish larvae to detect potential side effects of new drugs at an early stage; Copyright: Dietze / HIPS

Dietze / HIPS

HIPS and CISPA join forces to make future active ingredients safer

23.02.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: Immune cell trafficking in diabetic cataract formation.; Copyright: HAWK

HAWK

Imaging: role of immune cells in early diabetic cataract development

22.02.2023

The team of researchers, led by Prof. Dr. Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Director of the Molecular Biomarkers Nano-Imaging Laboratory (MBNI), in collaboration with Professor Dr. Christoph Rußmann, Dean of the Health Campus and a Visiting Professor at MBNI, found early signs of damage in the eye before the onset of type 2 diabetes.
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Image: Fluorescence staining of Arlo cells. The image shows the overlay of a staining of cell nuclei (gray) and the tight junction protein 1 (blue); Copyright: HIPS/Boese

HIPS/Boese

New cell model for the human lung

16.02.2023

A team led by Prof Claus-Michael Lehr of the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) has developed a novel human lung cell line that should enable much more accurate predictions of the behavior of active substances or dosage forms in humans than previous systems.
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Image: A man in a white coat and with safety goggles, Hongji Yan, holds a test tube in his hand and is looking at the camera; Copyright: Vaibhav Srivastava

Vaibhav Srivastava

Mucus-based gel improves bone graft results, promotes healing

14.02.2023

Molecules from mucus can be used to produce synthetic bone graft material and help with the healing of larger bone loss, a new study found.
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Image: A woman with black hair in a white coat sits in a research laboratory and operates a microscope; Copyright: wichayada69

wichayada69

Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials

08.02.2023

A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Image: Dr Christoph Schultheiss determines blood values for Long COVID in the research laboratory; Copyright: Universitätsmedizin Halle

Universitätsmedizin Halle

Long COVID: blood values indicate reprogramming of immune cells

26.01.2023

The underlying mechanisms of long COVID are not yet fully understood. Molecular clues to different subgroups of long COVID have now been provided by a research group at University Medicine Halle.
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Image: small empty test tubes with lids in different colors; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

RNA technologies make targeted immune activation possible

03.11.2022

MEDICA 2022 is right around the corner, ready to deliver insights into the advancements and innovations in laboratory medicine. One of the key topics of the MEDICA LABMED Forum is RNA technologies and the wide range of applications that involve cell biology. RNA technologies not only enable Covid-19 vaccines but promise an array of treatment options for genetic diseases, in and beyond oncology.
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Image: Doctor and medical assistant at the bedside of a patient who has breathing problems and is wearing an oxygen mask; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Why some people get a more severe COVID-19 progression than others

22.08.2022

A team of scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) together with colleagues from the United Kingdom and Canada have found genes and proteins that contribute to a higher risk of severe COVID-19.
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Image: Person in the laboratory holding cell samples under a microscope; Copyright: MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

Molecular markers: predicting the most effective treatment for IBD

09.08.2022

Early effective treatment can help manage this condition and improve the quality of life of patients. A research project aims to identify molecular markers to better assess the chances of success of certain biological therapies and subsequently determine the best individualized treatment plan.
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Image: Two men in white shirs - Kazuki Takahashi, Manabu Tokeshi; Copyright: Manabu Tokeshi

Manabu Tokeshi

SARS-CoV-2: rapid method to quantify antibodies

29.07.2021

Scientists have developed a rapid, highly accurate test to detect antibodies against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in human serum, opening a new avenue for understanding the full extent of the pandemic and evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.
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Image: Head of a mannequin with transparent face shield and surgical mask; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/Achim Wiese

virtual.MEDICA 2020: Experience medicine online

02.11.2020

This year is completely different! Normally, we would offer you an advanced peek into the MEDICA’s halls in Dusseldorf at this point. But due to the corona pandemic, the trade fair takes place online as virtual.MEDICA. We nevertheless took a look at this year’s topics of special interest.
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Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23.03.2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03.02.2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Preview picture of video

Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
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