MEDICA: Laboratory Equipment
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Image: Man sitting before a monitor showing data from a microscope in the foreground while a woman in the background is looking through a microscope; Copyright: MPIKG

MPIKG

Harnessing light to control cellular dynamics

23.05.2024

Researchers led by Rumiana Dimova at the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces have developed a technique that uses light to understand and control the inner dynamics of cells. By employing lights of different colors, they can alter the interactions within cellular components, offering a precise and non-invasive method to administer drugs directly into the cells.
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Image: Depiction of the bioelectronic mesh in purple and green with red graphene sensors; Copyright: Gao et al., 10.1038/s41467-024-46636-7

Gao et al., 10.1038/s41467-024-46636-7

Bioelectronic mesh for cardiac tissue monitoring

30.04.2024

A team of engineers, led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has developed a cutting-edge bioelectronic mesh system integrated with graphene sensors to monitor both mechanical movement and electrical signals in lab-grown human cardiac tissue.
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Image: A Fraunhofer IWS laboratory device is held by a person in blue gloves; Copyright: minkus-images.de/Fraunhofer IWS

minkus-images.de/Fraunhofer IWS

Insights into the development of metastases with miniature laboratories

22.04.2024

New developments at the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS and partners enable improved research possibilities for cancer therapy using microphysiological systems.
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Image: A man looks through a microscope in the foreground, while a woman stands in the background and explains something to him; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/Andreas Wiese

Messe Düsseldorf/Andreas Wiese

World Laboratory Day: Laboratory medicine in transition

16.04.2024

World Laboratory Day takes place annually on April 23. It is intended to draw attention to the work in laboratories and the achievements of laboratory employees. MEDICA-tradefair.com takes the day as an opportunity to highlight current trends that continue to shape these work environments. These trends will also be a main focus of the MEDICA LABMED FORUM at MEDICA 2024.
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Image: Microscopic view of human skin tissue with the top layer of epidermal cells and underlying dermal layers stained in different colors for examination; Copyright: TERM/UKW

TERM/UKW

The potential of nasal cartilage in knee joint treatment

05.04.2024

At the University Hospital Wuerzburg, a promising new treatment for knee joint defects involves the use of nasal cartilage, and it's edging closer to approval with significant EU funding. The new method is using autologous cartilage from the nasal septum, an approach that may seem as enchanting as the term "ENCANTO" implies.
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Image: A woman lies on her back covered with a hairnet and is examined with a measuring device on her facial skin.

Raman sensor system: non-invasive monitoring with wide-ranging applications

04.04.2024

The Raman sensor system opens new monitoring possibilities by precisely measuring the concentration of carotenoids in the skin - a potential indicator of health. This technology offers a non-invasive insight into dietary habits and health status, with the potential to monitor the effectiveness of chemotherapies.
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Image: The picture shows a graphic of a pink colored mitochondria. The background is black.

Determine stroke risk early with tear fluid, mitochondria and AI

08.03.2024

Over 100 million people globally suffer from strokes annually, with ischemic strokes being the most common. However, many strokes go undetected, leading to severe consequences like dementia or depression. Prof. Olga Golubnitschaja from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) has spearheaded a comprehensive approach to assess stroke risk early, focusing on predictive medicine.
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Image: The graphic visualizes the 3D bio-printing method. It shows two needles injecting hydrogels and fibers; Copyright: Universität Bayreuth

Universität Bayreuth

Advanced 3D printing technology improves tissue engineering

19.02.2024

Advancements in 3D printing technology are improving tissue engineering, offering promising prospects for the artificial production of biological tissues. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have developed a changing technique that combines hydrogels and fibers, opening new avenues for tissue fabrication.
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Image: A stained micrograph of 3D primary human liver cell tissue modeling MASH. Areas of fibrosis are indicated in blue; Copyright: Viscient Biosciences

Viscient Biosciences

Revolutionizing liver disease research with 3D bioprinted model

07.02.2024

Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), previously known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a liver disease characterized by inflammation and scarring, reaching epidemic proportions with an estimated 1.5 percent to 6.5 percent of U.S. adults affected.
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Image: Two people in a laboratory working with a nanoparticle paste and light. Copyright: Empa

Empa

Smart wound sealing with nanoparticles and light soldering

24.01.2024

Empa researchers have pioneered a novel soldering process that employs nanoparticles and lasers to gently fuse tissue, ushering in a new era in wound closure.
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Image: Person holding a sample in a petri dish; Copyright: Freepik

Freepik

Enhancing urinary tract infection diagnosis with AI

23.01.2024

Researchers at Fraunhofer Austria and the AULSS2 Marca Trevigiana Institute in Treviso have leveraged artificial intelligence (AI) to streamline the diagnosis of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their advanced AI-based method promises to significantly reduce the workload of laboratories and expedite diagnosis times.
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Image: A high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP) up close; Copyright: UQ

UQ

Protecting against zika virus with a microarray patch

22.01.2024

In the global fight against the Zika virus, researchers are developing a vaccine patch that promises an effective and painless solution. This needle-free vaccine patch, utilizing the high-density microarray patch (HD-MAP).
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Image: Close-up and 3D illustration of cream-colored molecules on a black background; Copyright: Determined

Determined

A sugar analysis could reveal different types of cancer

22.12.2023

In the future, a little saliva may be enough to detect an incipient cancer. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed an effective way to interpret the changes in sugar molecules that occur in cancer cells.
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Image: AI-based segmentation of melanoma metastases in a tumor; Copyright: USZ

USZ

Understanding and fighting tumors better with new algorithms

21.12.2023

The University Hospital Zurich, the University of Zurich and the diagnostics company Roche are expanding their collaboration in cancer research. In the fully digitalized Morphomolecular Pathology Laboratory, they are developing algorithms that can further improve the effectiveness of immunotherapies.
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Image: Cell culture plates in an incubator; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Detecting side effects of new drugs on the heart more efficiently

12.12.2023

Scientists at the University Medical Center and the University of Göttingen have developed a novel method to predict the side effects of new drugs and therapeutic approaches on the heart more efficiently.
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Image: A sample is placed in a centrifuge by a person wearing personal protective clothing; Copyright: microgen

microgen

TissueGrinder: Improved cell analyses via enhanced-quality sample preparation

07.12.2023

A new method for examining tissue samples could change the way we diagnose and treat cancer. Researchers at the Max Planck and Fraunhofer IPA have developed an automated system based on the principle of enzyme-free tissue processing and the mechanical deformability of individual cells.
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Image: Optical resolution of the latest super-resolution microscopy methods on biomolecules: artistic diagram; Copyright: Universität Würzburg

Universität Würzburg

PicoRuler: Molecular rulers for high-resolution microscopy

06.12.2023

A team from the Rudolf Virchow Zentrum – Center for Integrative and Translational Bioimaging at Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg, led by Dr Gerti Beliu and Professor Markus Sauer, presents a groundbreaking advance for the world of high-resolution fluorescence microscopy.
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Laboratory equipment – fit for the future with more sustainability

30.11.2023

We spoke to exhibitors at MEDICA 2023 who are driving sustainability in laboratory operations with their products. Watch the video to find out what levers are available here and which products can already be manufactured sustainably today.
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Image: An artist’s impression of a GELECTO machine interacting with biological cells via sending and reading of electrical and biochemical signals; Copyright: Leibniz-IPF, Ivan Minev

Leibniz-IPF, Ivan Minev

New era of cyborganics – Prof. Ivan Minev receives ERC Consolidator Grant

30.11.2023

Over the next five years, the ERC will provide two million euro of funding for the development of a new class of electronic components that consist almost entirely of water and could make the interface between biological tissue and machine seamless.
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Image: Three men stand in the UCD Conway Institute; Copyright: Vincent Hoban, University College Dublin

Vincent Hoban, University College Dublin

World’s first commercial deployment of novel soft X-ray microscope

03.11.2023

SiriusXT Ltd, an Irish technology SME, announced the world’s first commercial deployment of the SXT-100, the company’s unique table-top Soft X-ray Microscope with applications in disease research and the drug discovery process, at the UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research at University College Dublin.
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Image: Image of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles (pink) in human colon cancer cells (green) 24 hours after addition to cell culture; Copyright: umg/Dr. Dolma Choezom

umg/Dr. Dolma Choezom

Project CANACO: better imaging-based and targeted therapy of colon cancer

01.11.2023

The University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) is coordinating the development of a new nanoparticle-based method for the personalized therapy of patients suffering from colon cancer.
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Image: Man with long hair and olive green sweater posing: Kristian Franze with brain model; Copyright: Stephan Spangenberg

Stephan Spangenberg

UNFOLD research project receives prestigious ERC Synergy Grant

01.11.2023

Physicist and veterinarian Prof. Dr. Kristian Franze, Director at the Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin (MPZPM) and Director of the Institute for Medical Physics and Microtissue Engineering at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has been awarded an ERC Synergy Grant.
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Image: Diagram of synapse formation: Glowing protein shows the development of synaptic vesicles; Copyright: Barth van Rossum, FMP

Barth van Rossum, FMP

Microscopy and fluorescence show how synapses are formed

23.10.2023

How are synapses formed, those points of contact that allow the transmission of information from one neuron to the other? Working with an international team, researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have now uncovered a crucial mechanism and elucidated the identity of the axonal transport vesicles that generates synapses.
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Image: “Organ-on-chip” symbol image. Close-up of a biochip on a black background; Copyright: NMI

NMI

Menopause: leveraging organ-on-chip technology for new insights

09.10.2023

Addressing the impact of female menopause on dynamic resilience and exploring preventive and therapeutic strategies is the aim of an international and interdisciplinary research group led by Prof. Dr. Peter Loskill from the NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen.
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COMPASS: Inexpensive and fast detection method for viruses

02.10.2023

Since Corona, everyone has probably come into contact with a rapid test for checking viral load. A new device called COMPASS promises much faster and more effective testing than conventional methods. It was developed by researchers at Julius Maximilian University in Würzburg in cooperation with Erlangen University Hospital.
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Image: Dr. Marina Dziuba in the laboratory with bacterial cultures to produce magnetic nanoparticles; Copyright: Christian Wißler/UBT

Christian Wißler/UBT

EXIST funding for bacterial magnetic nanoparticles

28.09.2023

BioMagnetix uses bacterial magnetic nanoparticles as innovative materials for biomedical applications. The founding team aims to develop and continuously improve high-quality and highly functional magnetic nanoparticles for imaging techniques and therapeutic purposes, such as cancer treatment.
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Image: Cellular Cartography - Charting the Sizes and Abundance of Our Body's Cells Reveals Mathematical Order Underlying Life; Copyright: MPIMIS

MPIMIS

Cellular cartography: sizes and abundance revealed

27.09.2023

An international team of scientists has created the first comprehensive index of human cells, mapping the sizes and abundance of all cell types across the entire body.
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Image: Man with dark hair, glasses and a checked shirt smiles into the camera against a gray and white background; Copyright: Peer Erfle/IMT

Peer Erfle/IMT

Microchips: better understand diseases like schizophrenia

15.09.2023

The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the recipients of its prestigious Starting Grants. Among them is a researcher from the Technical University of Braunschweig: Dr. Thomas Winkler will receive €1.5 million for his research on modular organ-on-chip technology to better understand neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.
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Image: A woman hands a yellow piece of paper to a man across a table where another person is also sitting; Copyright: InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics

InfectoGnostics study: Benefits of on-site tests in general practices

05.09.2023

General practitioners (GP) regularly use on-site rapid tests because they find their application useful. However, frequent utilisation fails due to costs and remuneration regulations. These are the results of a study by InfectoGnostics researchers at the University Hospital Jena in the project "POCT-ambulant", in which 292 GPs in Thuringia, Bremen and Bavaria participated.
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Image: Two men and a woman in white coats work in a laboratory with reaction vessels; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

More impact against cancer

04.09.2023

MHH molecular physician Professor Dr. Dr. Schambach wants to use genetically modified natural killer cells to find new therapeutic options against three particularly malignant cancers. The EU is funding the project with 3.8 million euros
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Image: Illustration of a protein structure with its amino acid complexes; Copyright: Kateryna Maksymenko

Kateryna Maksymenko

Innovative computational approach helps design proteins for cancer treatment

31.08.2023

A joint team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen and the University Hospital Tübingen has now developed and tested a new computational method to greatly speed up the necessary energy calculations.
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Image: A man and woman pose seated with a dummy syringe that says

Anne Günther/Uni Jena

Timing is key in cortisone treatment of inflammation

30.08.2023

A special type of starch could soon be used as an excipient in medicine to improve the treatment of patients.
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Image: The team at the Institute of PharmaceuticalMicrobiology: Three women and a man in white coats smile for the camera; Copyright: Gregor Hübl/University of Bonn

Gregor Hübl/University of Bonn

Researchers decode new antibiotic

29.08.2023

Cooperation between the University of Bonn, the USA and the Netherlands cracks the mode of action of clovibactin
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Image: Close-up of microtiter plates that are filled with several pipettes; Copyright: LMU

LMU

Immunotherapy: Antibody kit to fight tumors

25.08.2023

A new study highlights the potential of artificial DNA structures that, when fitted with antibodies, instruct the immune system to specifically target cancerous cells.
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Image: Judit Burgaya and Prof. Dr. Marco Galardini in the TWINCORE at a bar table with a laptop; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

How harmless turns dangerous

24.08.2023

MHH researcher Prof. Galardini from the RESIST Cluster of Excellence finds causes for bloodstream infections in the genes of bacteria. This will enable better diagnostics and vaccinations in the future.
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Image: Microscopic image: cultivation of muscle stem cells and fibers from reprogrammed connective tissue cells; Copyright: ETH Zürich / Bar-Nur Lab

ETH Zürich / Bar-Nur Lab

Building muscle in the lab

23.08.2023

A new method allows large quantities of muscle stem cells to be safely obtained in cell culture.
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Image: A woman in personal protective clothing examines samples under a microscope; Copyright: monkeybusiness

monkeybusiness

Pandemic prevention: progress in research infrastructure

15.08.2023

The Covid-19 pandemic has clearly shown that there is still a lot of potential in research structures and funding to better manage a pandemic. Prevention plays just as important a role as dealing with the pandemic. Technological measures that can facilitate virus detection or help to analyze the course in more detail need to be developed.
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Image: Uršula Vide from the Institute of Biochemistry at TU Graz working in the lab; Copyright: TU Graz

TU Graz

Light as on-off switch for enzymes

10.08.2023

Researchers at TU Graz have gained new insights into the functioning of a protein found in bacteria, whose enzymatic activity is activated by blue light.
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Image: Innovative 3D cell culture modell; Copyright: University of Nottingham

University of Nottingham

PeptiMatrix: Platform could replace use of animals in research

09.08.2023

PeptiMatrix is the latest spin-out company from the University of Nottingham, providing access to an innovative 3D cell culture platform that aims to replace the use of animals in research.
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Image: It shows the activation of a chemical signaling pathway (ERK pathway; top-right) merged with a simulation of 2D cell areas (bottom-left) in a monolayer of cells; Copyright: Hannezo Group | ISTA

Hannezo Group | ISTA

Cell dynamics: how cells talk to each other

26.07.2023

Like us, cells communicate. Well, in their own special way. Using waves as their common language, cells tell one another where and when to move.
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Image: Woman hands holding human brain over green wheat field; Copyright: Masson-Simon

Masson-Simon

Brain: a varied life boosts functional networks

18.07.2023

The findings in mice provide unprecedented insights into the complexity of large-scale neural networks and brain plasticity. Moreover, they could pave the way for new brain-inspired artificial intelligence methods.
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Image: Image showing the preparation of hydrogels that enhance the viability of NK cells; Copyright: KIMM

KIMM

3D bioprinting technology to be used for removing cancer cells

14.07.2023

KIMM develops the world’s first 3D bioprinting technology that enhances the function of NK immune cells. The new technology is expected to improve effectiveness of cancer treatment.
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Image: clock in the background with scattered pills in the foreground; Copyright: rawf8

rawf8

Improved cancer therapy: TimeTeller shows what makes the body tick

06.07.2023

Using the internal clock to optimize chemotherapies in cancer treatment - that is the goal of the start-up TimeTeller. If the drugs are administered at the ideal time of day for chemotherapy, it can reduce side effects and improve the effect. TimeTeller has developed a method for determining the internal clock to make this possible.
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Image: Cross-sectional electron micrographs of individual nerve fibers in MS brain biopsies; Axons sheathed with myelin showing increasingly damage ; Copyright: Leipzig University

Leipzig University

Multiple sclerosis: Myelin may be detrimental to nerve fibres

05.07.2023

Researchers at Leipzig University and Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have discovered that myelin, which was previously thought to be solely protective, can actually threaten the survival of the axons.
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Image: Child being tested for viruses in the throat by a doctor using a test swab; Copyright: drazenphoto

drazenphoto

Revolutionizing virus detection: the power of AI and CRISPR

04.07.2023

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, scientists and researchers have been tirelessly working to develop innovative and accurate tests to identify the presence of viruses. One breakthrough technology that has emerged is the combination of artificial intelligence (AI) and CRISPR, which has revolutionized virus detection.
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Image: Two men and three women pose in white coats in a laboratory; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

New biomarkers of non-small cell lung cancer discovered

27.06.2023

Researchers of the University of Barcelona and the Institute of Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) have identified new biomarkers for non-small cell lung cancer, the most common lung cancer.
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Image: The hydrogel composite is demonstratively stretched by Alexandre Anthis; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Sensor patch for abdominal surgery

23.06.2023

Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have developed a plaster with a sensor function to ensure that wounds in the abdomen remain tightly closed after an operation.
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Image: Two women with loose hair and colorful blazers pose in front of an institute; Copyright: Gregor Hübl / Universität Bonn

Gregor Hübl / Universität Bonn

Researching organoids: two new Argelander Professors at the University of Bonn

21.06.2023

Two new assistant professors at the University of Bonn are setting out to develop “mini-organs” in order to study metabolic and disease mechanisms.
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Image: Micrograph of bacterial biofilms; Copyright: Buntan2019

Buntan2019

Biofilms: Infection model from the 3D printer

21.06.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) have developed a novel method to place biofilms on lung cells in the laboratory. The model system produced by means of "bioprinting" should help to better understand infection processes and assist in the development of new active substances.
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Image: Viral Microscope View. 3D illustration of a corona virus in blue color; Copyright: maxxyustas

maxxyustas

Corona: The virus needs only a single door opener

15.06.2023

Why is the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus able to spread so efficiently? Various hypotheses are still circulating in the scientific community. A group of researchers from Würzburg has now found groundbreaking answers.
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Image: Red 3D illustration of a human lungs on a black background; Copyright: Pixabay

Pixabay

Lung: bacterial colonisation also depends on genes of the host

13.06.2023

We know from previous studies that changes in the lung microbiome are associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Environmental factors such as smoking, nutrition in infancy or the use of antibiotics are important factors for the composition and stability of the microbial community in the lung.
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Image: Micrograph: Certain immune cells called microglia (yellow) remove amyloid plaques (magenta) in the brain of an Alzheimer's mouse; Copyright: MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

Dementia: poorly insulated nerve cells promote Alzheimer's disease in old age

08.06.2023

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have shown that defective myelin actively promotes disease-related changes in Alzheimer’s. Slowing down age-related myelin damage could open up new ways to prevent the disease or delay its progression in the future.
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Image: Visualization of a radioactive preparation that docks onto blood cells in a bloodstream; Copyright: B. Schröder/HZDR

B. Schröder/HZDR

Cancer: new theranostic for imaging and treatment

01.06.2023

Thanks to the radiation they emit, radioactive compounds are suited both to imaging and treating cancers. By appropriately combining them in novel, so-called radionuclide theranostics, both applications can be dovetailed.
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Image: Two women, Wiebke Möbius and Sophie Hümmert, at a white electron microscope; Copyright: Swen Pförtner MPI

Swen Pförtner MPI

Multiple Sclerosis: structural changes in brain tissue promote inflammatory processes

31.05.2023

A German-Dutch research team has shown that ultrastructural changes in healthy areas in the white matter of MS patients make the tissue more susceptible to inflammation and the formation of lesions
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Image: Several tubes of blood in a laboratory for a blood test; Copyright: mirarahneva

mirarahneva

Neurosurgery: blood tests can show impact on the brain

31.05.2023

Damage to the brains of patients operated on for brain tumors may be assessed by measuring biomarkers in the blood pre- and postoperatively. A new study by University of Gothenburg researchers shows that the increase in markers tallies well with the impairment caused by insufficient blood flow.
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Image: One man and two women posing for the camera with a building in the background; Copyright: Karolinska Institutet

Karolinska Institutet

New method reveals bacterial reaction to antibiotics in five minutes

26.05.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a molecular method able to detect whether or not bacteria respond to antibiotics within minutes.
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Image: A doctor takes a saliva sample from a patient in an examination room; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

TimeTeller: tenth spin-off of the BIH Digital Health Accelerator

25.05.2023

An interdisciplinary team led by Prof. Angelo Relógio, a scientist at Charité’s Molecular Cancer Research Center (MKFZ) and Institute for Theoretical Biology and the MSH Medical School Hamburg, has developed a non-invasive method for profiling a person’s unique circadian rhythm.
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Image: A computer that evaluates stool samples using bioinformatic methods; Copyright: Anna Schroll/Leibniz-HKI

Anna Schroll/Leibniz-HKI

Model shows intestinal bacteria influence growth of fungi

22.05.2023

The bacteria present in the intestine provide information about the quantities of fungi of the potentially disease-causing Candida genus.
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Image: A man in a gray jacket and white shirt, Miroslaw Bober, smiles at the camera; Copyright: University of Surrey

University of Surrey

UK AI world leader in identifying location and expression of proteins

18.05.2023

A new advanced artificial intelligence (AI) system has shown world-leading accuracy and speed in identifying protein patterns within individual cells.
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Image: Close-up of a WFIRM gyroid-shaped construct on a blue-gloved hand; Copyright: WFIRM

WFIRM

Bioprinting research makes history when it soars to the ISS

17.05.2023

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) will make history this month when the first bioprinted solid tissue constructs soar to the International Space Station (ISS) on board the next all private astronaut mission by commercial space leader Axiom Space.
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Image: A man in a white shirt wearing glasses - Prof. Andreas Keller, sits in his office at the computer; Copyright: Saarland University/Oliver Dietze

Universität des Saarlandes/Oliver Dietze

Exploring the molecular mechanisms of ageing

09.05.2023

A team led by bioinformatics experts Andreas Keller and Fabian Kern from Saarland University together with researchers at Stanford University have gained new insights into manifestations of ageing at the molecular level.
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Image: Modern ECG machine in the hospital emergency room for diagnosis of a heart attack; Copyright: nd3000

nd3000

Atrial fibrillation: Targeted drug therapy approach discovered for the first time

04.05.2023

When the heart gets out of rhythm, characteristic processes occur in the heart muscle cells. Among other things, the currents of electrically charged particles (ions) change. In chronic atrial fibrillation, one of these currents is reduced.
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Image: 3D-segmentation of different structures related to an infection with the Ebola virus.; Copyright: Petr Chlanda

Petr Chlanda

Luring the virus into a trap

04.05.2023

Heidelberg researchers describe mechanisms that could help prevent infections with the influenza A and Ebola viruses.
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Image: A Setup to conduct Optical Nanomotion Detection, b Optical image of E. coli bacteria. C. Same field of view as B in false colors; Copyright: Ines Villalba (EPFL)

Ines Villalba (EPFL)

Antibiotic resistance: fast, cheap, and easy test method

02.05.2023

“We have developed a technique in our laboratories that allows us to obtain an antibiogram within 2-4 hours – instead of the current 24 hours for the most common germs and one month for tuberculosis,” says Dr Sandor Kasas at EPFL.
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Image: A female physician and an assistant are looking at MRI images on a screen; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

BioDevCenter: biologicals are the future of medicine

27.04.2023

Not all advances in medical technology immediately catch your eye – take biologicals, for example. These are molecules that are biotechnologically designed for a specific application. In the German state of Baden-Württemberg, the Biologicals Development Center (BioDevCenter) and its infrastructure aim to bring them to market faster in the future.
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Image: Schematic illustration of organoid bioprinting with artificial intelligence ; Copyright: Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Bioprinting technology and AI enable high quality in vitro models

19.04.2023

In the process of organoid manufacturing, bioprinting technology not only facilitates the creation and maintenance of complex biological 3D shapes and structures, but also allows for standardization and quality control during production.
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Image: Tissue engineering, tweezers with a solution in a laboratory vessel; Copyright: Fraunhofer-Translationszentrum/Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer-Translationszentrum/Fraunhofer ISC

SAPs4Tissue: human tissue models with customized biomaterials

12.04.2023

In a joint project of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, and the Translational Center for Regenerative Therapies at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Würzburg, scientific principles and biomaterials for the standardized production of valid tissue models are to be developed.
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Image: Graphic with the headline “Nanoreactors” that show the structure of a bead with annotations; Copyright: BLINK DX

BLINK DX

BLINK DX: revolutionizing digital PCR

11.04.2023

The polymerase chain reaction, or PCR, plays a major role both in the diagnosis of infectious diseases and in research. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the term has become widely known. At MEDICA 2022, the BLINK AG from Jena, Germany, presented the BLINK Beads, a technology that is bound to revolutionize the applications of PCR.
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Image: A woman with dark hair, dark glasses and a white coat stands in front of a door frame in a laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Daniel Delang / TUM

Daniel Delang / TUM

Mini-heart in a Petri dish: organoid emulates development of the human heart

11.04.2023

The team working with Alessandra Moretti, Professor of Regenerative Medicine in Cardiovascular Disease, has developed a method for making a sort of "mini-heart" using pluripotent stem cells.
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Image: Three men and a woman in white lab coats pose for the camera in a laboratory; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

Microfluidics physics-based device to predict cancer therapy response

06.04.2023

A team of experts has designed a microfluidic device called microfluidic dynamic BH3 profiling (μDBP) that predicts the effectiveness of cancer treatment quickly and automatically.
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Image: Group picture in front of the BSL 3 high-security laboratory; Four women and three men in business attire; Copyright: Helmholtz Munich/Matthias Balk

Helmholtz Munich/Matthias Balk

Helmholtz Munich: research infrastructure for pandemic management and prevention expanded

05.04.2023

From now on, an improved research infrastructure for pandemic management and prevention will be available in the Greater Munich area: on the 29th of March 2023 a new biosafety level 3 laboratory was introduced at Helmholtz Munich.
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Image: medical syringe lies on several doses of vaccine; Copyright: erika8213

erika8213

AI meets zebrafish: is this the future of drug discovery?

04.04.2023

New drug candidates must undergo lengthy testing using animal models before being given to participants in human trials. This means many active ingredients must already be sorted out in test series because they either do not have the desired or even have an adverse effect. These test series require many test animals. The use of zebrafish larvae could lead to a reduced demand in this setting.
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Image: Study co-authors in white coats (from left) Caleb Bashor, Antonios Mikos and Letitia Chim; Copyright: Gustavo Raskosky/Rice University

Gustavo Raskosky/Rice University

Upgraded tumor model optimizes search for cancer therapies

27.03.2023

Rice University researchers developed an upgraded tumor model that houses osteosarcoma cells beside immune cells known as macrophages inside a three-dimensional structure engineered to mimic bone. Using the model, bioengineer Antonios Mikos and collaborators found that the body’s immune response can make tumor cells more resistant to chemotherapy.
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Image: Detailed measurement of how the motor protein kinesin-1 (red) walks on microtubules (white); Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Further advance in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

16.03.2023

Scientists led by Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have developed a super-resolution microscope with a spatio-temporal precision of one nanometer per millisecond.
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Image: Close-up of a scientist wearing protective clothing looking through a microscope; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Smart microscopy works out where to take the picture

16.03.2023

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a software solution for smart, data-driven microscopy, which makes this possible.
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Image: Black cones show water molecules being oriented in the electric field at the interface with the lipid; Copyright: Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Standard model of electroporation refuted

15.03.2023

Technology developed at the University of Freiburg enables experimental test. The new findings could help to improve the transport of active substances into cells
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Image: Photograph of the semitransparent hydrogel used in this study; Copyright: Satoshi Tanikawa, et al. 2023

Satoshi Tanikawa, et al. 2023

Healing the brain: hydrogels enable neuronal tissue growth

03.03.2023

Synthetic hydrogels were shown to provide an effective scaffold for neuronal tissue growth in areas of brain damage, providing a possible approach for brain tissue reconstruction.
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Image: Portrait of a researcher with PPE equipment analyzing brain activity; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

New artificial model validates antibodies ability to reach the brain

03.03.2023

A research group at Uppsala University has developed a simple and effective artificial blood-brain barrier model that can be used to determine how well antibody-based therapies can enter the brain.
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Image: Pipette adding sample to stem cell cultures growing in pots for stem cell implantation; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Electrodes grown in the brain – paving the way for future therapies for neurological disorders

02.03.2023

The boundaries between biology and technology are becoming blurred. Researchers at Linköping, Lund, and Gothenburg universities in Sweden have successfully grown electrodes in living tissue using the body’s molecules as triggers. The result, published in the journal Science, paves the way for the formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.
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Image: Two men and a woman stand in front of a building and smile for the camera; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

AI with infrared imaging enables precise colon cancer diagnostics

23.02.2023

Researchers at the Centre for Protein Diagnostics PRODI at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, are using artificial intelligence in combination with infrared imaging to optimally tailor colon cancer therapy to individual patients.
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Image: Young female scientist in protective mask and glasses examining chemical or biological sample with microscope in laboratory; Copyright: Pressmaster

Pressmaster

AI analyses cell movement under the microscope

22.02.2023

The enormous amount of data obtained by filming biological processes using a microscope has previously been an obstacle for analyses.
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Image: Fluorescence staining of Arlo cells. The image shows the overlay of a staining of cell nuclei (gray) and the tight junction protein 1 (blue); Copyright: HIPS/Boese

HIPS/Boese

New cell model for the human lung

16.02.2023

A team led by Prof Claus-Michael Lehr of the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) has developed a novel human lung cell line that should enable much more accurate predictions of the behavior of active substances or dosage forms in humans than previous systems.
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Image: A woman with black hair in a white coat sits in a research laboratory and operates a microscope; Copyright: wichayada69

wichayada69

Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials

08.02.2023

A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Image: Human blood cells, highly magnified under the microscope; Copyright: PeterHermesFurian

PeterHermesFurian

"Spleen-on-a-chip" yields insight into sickle cell disease

06.02.2023

With this microfluidic device, researchers modeled how sickled blood cells clog the spleen’s filters, leading to a potentially life-threatening condition.
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Bild: Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Bacterial electricity: Membrane potential influences antibiotic tolerance

27.01.2023

The electrical potential across the bacterial cell envelope indicates when bacteria no longer operate as individual cells but as a collective. Researchers at the University of Cologne's Institute for Biological Physics have discovered this connection between the electrical properties and the lifestyle of bacteria.
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Bild: DNA strand assembly from different elements. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

The architecture of shattered genomes

27.01.2023

Hunting for disease clues in the dark matter of our DNA. Scientists have reconstructed the chromosomes of patients with an extremely high number of aberrations in their genome that could alter the expression of nearby genes and potentially cause disease. Their results were published in Nature Communications in October 2022.
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Image: Dr Christoph Schultheiss determines blood values for Long COVID in the research laboratory; Copyright: Universitätsmedizin Halle

Universitätsmedizin Halle

Long COVID: blood values indicate reprogramming of immune cells

26.01.2023

The underlying mechanisms of long COVID are not yet fully understood. Molecular clues to different subgroups of long COVID have now been provided by a research group at University Medicine Halle.
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Image: Dr Anke Katharina Bergmann in a white coat, holding a tablet, is standing in front of a virtual map of Europe; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH, Freepik.com

Karin Kaiser / MHH, Freepik.com

MHH leads EU large-scale project for personalized cancer care

26.01.2023

CAN.HEAL aims to expand the available innovations in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment in the Member States in order to improve care for all patients in the EU. The project focuses on measures of personalized medicine. Genomics is an important cornerstone for this.
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Bild: A research team of two works in the laboratory with a laptop. Analyzing the results; Copyright: Hoverstock

Hoverstock

Sequential antibiotic therapy in the laboratory and in patients

23.01.2023

Rapid switching between different antibiotics could prevent the evolution of resistance and lead to successful treatment of patients.
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Image: Researcher examines cell culture plates under the microscope; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

18.01.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
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Bild: Close-up of a laboratory technician, he tests a sample using a spectrometer in the laboratory, fills the sample into the cuvette; Copyright: kwanruanp

kwanruanp

DZHK establishes two central biobanks - cooperation partners welcome

16.01.2023

The German Center for Cardiovascular Research is centralizing its biospecimens collections, which are currently stored at 60 sites. Therefore, it is looking for two biobanks as scientific cooperation partners. Applications are now open to all German biobanks.
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Image: Two men and two women are standing in a laboratory and examining a small apparatus (microphysiological system); Copyright: Amac Garbe/Fraunhofer IWS

Amac Garbe/Fraunhofer IWS

Radioactive substances fight cancer in the mini-lab

13.01.2023

Two Dresden research institutes want to reduce the number of animal experiments in radiopharmaceutical research with a new idea.
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Image: Close-up Of A Man Checking Blood Sugar Level At Home With Glucometer And Test Strips; Copyright: dolgachov

dolgachov

Type 2 diabetes: Machine learning can predict poor glycemic control from patient information systems

13.01.2023

The risk for poor glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes can be predicted with confidence by using machine learning methods, a new study from Finland finds.
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Image: Two doctors in scrubs look at a screen during an AI-assisted colonoscopy; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

Universitätsklinikum Bonn (UKB)

AI improves colorectal cancer screening in Lynch syndrome

10.01.2023

Researchers at the National Center for Hereditary Tumor Diseases (NZET) at Bonn University Hospital (UKB) have now found that artificial intelligence (AI) can improve the effectiveness of colonoscopy in the presence of Lynch syndrome.
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Image: Small moldecules - illustration in orange; Copyright: Aalto University

Aalto University

Gaining unprecedented view of small molecules by machine learning

06.01.2023

A new tool to identify small molecules offers benefits for diagnostics, drug discovery and fundamental research. A new machine learning model will help scientists identify small molecules, with applications in medicine, drug discovery and environmental chemistry.
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Image: Position of molecules on nanoparticle surfaces as a 3D illustration; Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

How optical microscopes allow detailed investigations of nanoparticles

06.01.2023

In their project "Supercol"- funded by the European Union - scientists want to achieve the investigation of nanoparticles with light.
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Image: A woman in a white coat with blue gloves sits at a large microscope; Copyright: LZH

LZH

Detecting bacterial infestation fast, contactless, and free of markers

05.01.2023

With a multimodal microscope, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and three partners in the joint project PriMe want to make it possible to detect bacterial infestation using fast, marker-free, and contactless imaging.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Laboratory: how smart gadgets support everyday work

17.11.2022

At MEDICA 2022, you can see why smart assistants are needed in the laboratory and which gadgets have made it into everyday laboratory work, thus reducing the workload of the specialists there and increasing efficiency.
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Image: Entrance area of Messe Düsseldorf,

Messe Düsseldorf / ctillmann

MEDICA 2022: Where Healthcare is going

03.11.2022

The time has come: MEDICA 2022 opens its doors! Whether start-ups, current research results from sports medicine or exciting contributions from the laboratories of this world - you will find all of this bundled at the trade fair center in Düsseldorf from November 14 to 17. For a brief overview of what visitors can expect in our forums and conferences, see our Topic of the Month.
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Image: small empty test tubes with lids in different colors; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

RNA technologies make targeted immune activation possible

03.11.2022

MEDICA 2022 is right around the corner, ready to deliver insights into the advancements and innovations in laboratory medicine. One of the key topics of the MEDICA LABMED Forum is RNA technologies and the wide range of applications that involve cell biology. RNA technologies not only enable Covid-19 vaccines but promise an array of treatment options for genetic diseases, in and beyond oncology.
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Image: Thierry Nordmann (left) & Lisa Schweizer are standing in the lab, each with a pipette in hand and a microtiter plate in front of them; Copyright: Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Deep Visual Proteomics: tracking down cancer

08.09.2022

Proteins are frequently called the building blocks of life because they are found everywhere, including in our cells. This makes them an important factor when it comes to diseases. As a result, mapping the protein landscape can be a crucial ally in the fight against diseases. Now, a German-Danish team has developed a method that provides researchers with unprecedented insights into cancer.
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Image: scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells in the blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized treatment of acute stroke: diagnostics with 3D virtual histology

23.08.2022

Every minute counts when someone is having an acute stroke. If the cause is a vascular blockage caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the brain, detailed insights into the thrombus composition is critical to remove or dissolve it successfully and help restore blood flow. But that’s often easier said than done when "time is brain".
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Image: Person in the laboratory holding cell samples under a microscope; Copyright: MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

Molecular markers: predicting the most effective treatment for IBD

09.08.2022

Early effective treatment can help manage this condition and improve the quality of life of patients. A research project aims to identify molecular markers to better assess the chances of success of certain biological therapies and subsequently determine the best individualized treatment plan.
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Image: Two male researchers analyzing data sets on a computer screen; Copyright: Felix Petermann | MDC

Felix Petermann | MDC

Project "ikarus" provides new insights for cancer research

01.08.2022

Artificial intelligence (AI) is about to become a game changer, especially in diagnostics. However, there are still limits to the use of AI. Dr. Altuna Akalin had to recognize this as well. The head of the Max Delbrück Center's (MDC) technology platform for "Bioinformatics and Omics Data Science" developed "ikarus" with his team.
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Image: a clean room of SOMI medical, in the rear area is an employee sitting, in the front area is a filled storage rack; Copyright: SOMI medical GmbH

SOMI medical GmbH

Production hygiene: the packaging process from warehouse to logistics

02.05.2022

Applications of telemedicine surged in popularity in efforts to reduce the COVID-19 infection risk for both medical professionals and patients. Unfortunately, the services typically lack a proper diagnostic option.
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Image: A used surgical mask is hanging from a branch in the woods; Copyright: PantherMedia/Valery Vvoennyy

PantherMedia/Valery Vvoennyy

Medical consumables: Will the pandemic inspire more sustainable practices?

01.03.2022

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a global increase in healthcare commodities and medical consumables: demand for face masks, gloves, protective apparel, and other personal protective equipment has soared as a result. This also applies to rapid tests, reagents, laboratory equipment and supplies. But all this sparked a myriad of problems.
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Image: Care workers in overalls in a patient room; Copyright: PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Better management of hospital resources in pandemic times through DNA measurement

15.02.2022

For nearly two years, the COVID-19 pandemic has kept a firm grip on the world and caused many intensive care units to hit full capacity. It would help medical professionals tremendously if they could make a reliable prognosis the moment patients are hospitalized. cfDNA screening could play an important role in the assessment of COVID-19 severity in patients.
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Image: A person with a smartphone in hand is standing in front of a computer-generated model of the liver; Copyright: PantherMedia/happysuthida

PantherMedia/happysuthida

AI-driven laboratory diagnostics with medicalvalues

25.01.2022

Lab results are often complex and not easy to interpret. For many diseases, a medical diagnosis requires the analysis and combination of different values. That’s why one of the themes at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM at MEDICA 2021 highlighted "Integrative and AI-driven diagnostics" - and illustrated how AI can help interpret laboratory results and values.
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Image: A person in a lab coat is holding a device with an antenna extended into a glass; Coypright: Universität des Saarlandes

Universität des Saarlandes

Coronavirus: Using odors to detect an infection

10.01.2022

Rapid COVID-19 tests can be rather uncomfortable as samples are typically collected with a deep nasal or throat swab. Scientists now explore an alternative to rapid diagnostic tests based on a patient’s breath.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Digital and automated laboratory – Robots as multifunctional helpers

26.11.2021

A lot of laboratory tasks require high precision on one hand, on the other they tend to be repetitive and tiring. While humans can only work for a limited time here while staying effective, robots are able to work without taking a break. The start-up bAhead wants to make collaborative robots, CoBots, adaptable helpers with the help of AI. We learn more from CEO & Founder Rainer Treptow.
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Image: The researchers incorporated their sensor into a prototype with a fiber optic tip that can detect changes in fluorescence in the test sample; Copyright: MIT

MIT

Carbon nanotube-based sensor can detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins

26.10.2021

Using specialized carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have designed a novel sensor that can detect SARS-CoV-2 without any antibodies, giving a result within minutes. Their new sensor is based on technology that can quickly generate rapid and accurate diagnostics, not just for Covid-19 but for future pandemics, the researchers say.
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Image: Data sheets and ampoules on a desk; Copyright: PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01.10.2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
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Image: a robot arm transporting a petri dish; Copyright: PantherMedia / angellodeco

PantherMedia / angellodeco

The smart lab: The shift to more digitization is picking up speed

01.10.2021

They have probably never been in the spotlight as much as during the pandemic: laboratories. In Germany alone, around 73 million COVID-19-tests have been evaluated since the beginning of 2020. And even away from Corona, laboratory physicians have a lot to do – blood, urine and aspirates have to be evaluated every day. That results in an enormous amount of work, just in terms of organization.
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Image: The KUKA robot sorts blood samples according to the color of their cap; Copyright: LT Automation

Image: The KUKA robot sorts blood samples according to the color of their cap; Copyright: LT Automation

Fast, accurate, automatic: Simplifying workflows with laboratory robots

01.10.2021

Unpacking and sorting of blood samples from general practitioners is a monotonous and time-consuming task. The Aalborg University Hospital has now automated the process: Up to 3000 blood samples every day are unpacked and sorted by two lab robots provided by LT Automation. Furthermore, the samples are temperature monitored and tracked, using the Intelligent Transport Boxes.
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Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01.10.2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: Drawing inspiration from nature, a team of international scientists have invented a smart device for personalized skin care modeled after the male diving beetle; Copyright: McGill University

McGill University

A skin crawling treatment for acne

01.09.2021

Drawing inspiration from nature, a team of international scientists have invented a smart device for personalized skin care modeled after the male diving beetle. This tool collects and monitors body fluids while sticking to the skin’s surface, paving the way for more accurate diagnostics and treatment for skin diseases and conditions like acne.
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Image: Scientist with pipette in laboratory ; Copyright: PantherMedia/alexraths

PantherMedia/lucadp

Genetic test better than blood test for cardiovascular diseases

31.08.2021

Determining an individual’s blood group based on genetic tests instead of merely traditional blood tests can provide a better picture of the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
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Image: A young man holding a rapid test for the Corona virus in one hand; Copyright: PantherMedia/Patrick Daxenbichler

PantherMedia/Patrick Daxenbichler

Research finds ways to improve accuracy of Lateral Flow Tests

24.06.2021

Research published in the journal ACS Materials and Interfaces has provided new understanding of how false-negative results in Lateral Flow Tests occur and provides opportunity for simple improvements to be made.
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Image: Close-up of an ultrasound head in the gloved hand of a physician; Copyright: PantherMedia/Bork

Faster treatment thanks to point-of-care diagnostics – in emergencies and beyond

01.06.2021

Making an informed and immediate treatment decision near or at the patient’s bedside – point-of-care testing (also known as POCT) makes this possible. Unlike stationary devices, special exam rooms or other service infrastructure, POC diagnostic devices offer a multitude of benefits including more flexibility, faster results, and lower costs.
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Image: An emergency physician is measuring the blood pressure of an injured boy on a stretcher; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Emergency medicine: point-of-care diagnostic at the deployment site

01.06.2021

The sooner diagnosis can be made during an emergency, the faster the patient receives help. While most diagnostics still take place at the hospital, emergency physicians use more and more mobile devices directly at the deployment site. This is how they can save precious time. We take a look at some point-of-care applications in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: tiny PCR chip; Copyright: Adapted from ACS Nano 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c02154

Adapted from ACS Nano 2021, DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.1c02154

Ultrafast, on-chip PCR to speed diagnosis during pandemics

28.05.2021

Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has been the gold standard for diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the PCR portion of the test requires bulky, expensive machines and takes about an hour to complete, making it difficult to quickly diagnose someone at a testing site.
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Image: Rescue team in action; Copyright: PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08.03.2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Tissue Engineering and Bioprinting – From artificial heart valves and printed humans

27.01.2021

Drug research and artificial skin replacement - these are the areas in which tissue engineering and bioprinting are already used today. What else could be possible in the future? We asked Dr. Nadine Nottrodt from Fraunhofer ILT and Prof. Sabine Neuß-Stein from RWTH Aachen University Hospital!
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Image: Laboratory robot Kevin; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

Fraunhofer IPA

Alone in the lab – robot Kevin relieves the staff

08.12.2020

If Kevin was alone in the lab at night, the next morning, the workers will not find chaos, but labeled tubes and prepared samples. Kevin is a laboratory robot developed by Fraunhofer IPA to relieve the strain on laboratory workers so that they can concentrate on the essentials: research and diagnostics.
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Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01.12.2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
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Image: Illustrations of various 3D-printed prostheses, implants and organs; Copyright: PantherMedia/annyart

Printed life – possibilities and limits of bioprinting

01.12.2020

Implants, prostheses and various other components made of plastic, metal or ceramics are already being produced by additive manufacturing. But skin, blood vessels or entire organs from the printer – is that possible? For years now, intensive research has been underway into the production of biologically functional tissue using printing processes. Some things are already possible with bioprinting.
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Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01.12.2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01.12.2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Smartlab – Robotics and automation in the laboratory

15.09.2020

Some tasks in the laboratory are repetitive, need to be done extremely precise and require a lot of time. Such tasks are very tedious for humans, but they are tailor-made for robots. Such is the case with the "AutoCRAT" project at the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT in Aachen. Here, a robotic platform is developed to produce stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis.
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Image: A miniaturized, round sensor under a fingertip; Copyright: TU Dresden

SmartLab: all-in-one automation, digitalization, and miniaturization

01.09.2020

Laboratories have to analyze and interpret an ever-increasing number of samples for research and diagnostic services, generating lots of data in the process. At the same time, labs are required to produce quality results and operate with speed. Processes that could once be managed using laboratory notebooks and isolated systems must become smart in the future to improve lab efficiency.
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Image: View into an automated laboratory machine that stores a lot of vials; Copyright: PantherMedia/kagemusha

The smart networking laboratory: when connected devices become one system

01.09.2020

Diagnostics, biomedical research, screening active ingredient candidates - laboratories perform many functions and must be flexible. Growing and evolving healthcare demands mean labs have to process an increasing number of samples. Modern laboratory information management systems can already support high-throughput, but a smart laboratory environment can make things even more efficient.
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Image: A young laboratory technician with AR glasses uses a pipette, he is surrounded by different bubbles with text; Copyright: Helbling Technik Wil AG

Augmented Reality for better laboratory results

01.09.2020

Accuracy is paramount in laboratory settings and ensures that lab results are valid. Errors in a lab can render series of tests unusable and waste precious time and money. In the medical realm, this might even result in clinical trial errors. Augmented reality (AR) can help laboratory technicians to prevent errors and guide their work in the future.
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Image: View into a device that automatically processes laboratory samples; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sonar

The laboratory 4.0: networked analyses

01.09.2020

There is likely no other branch of medicine where you can find as many high-tech devices as in modern laboratories. A major part of diagnostic and biomedical research is done here. A lot of individual steps in work processes need to be followed precisely to ensure the results’ quality. Also, a lot of data is generated here.
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Image: medical symbols around the earth in the hands of a person; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

PantherMedia/everythingposs

Israeli medical devices showcase digital innovations at MEDICA

24.08.2020

For the annual MEDICA trade fair, companies from all over the world assemble in Düsseldorf. The Israel Export Institute has been a part of it for the last couple of years. They present medical devices and digital innovations from different Israeli companies at their joint booth.
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Image: Two people wearing protective suits stand next to a workbench in a laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

epiLab: Coronavirus testing in the mobile safety laboratory

08.07.2020

A key to preventing SARS-CoV-2 spread is frequent, comprehensive testing. This allows the early detection of infections and helps break the chain of infection. It always comes down to Coronavirus testing capacity. In Germany's southwest state of Saarland, the mobile epiLab (epidemiological laboratory) supports the search for infections lurking in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.
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Image: Transmission of medical data of an athlete to a laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

Sports medicine software: Monitoring at the push of a button

22.05.2020

Athletes not only have to be fit and stay in shape, but they also have to achieve peak performance, especially when they get ready for athletic events. Optimized and individualized performance training requires data from external laboratories and institutes. The [i/med] Sports platform from DORNER Health IT Solutions provides a complete workflow − from anamnesis to diagnostic report.
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Image: A female researcher with face mask, gloves and cap puts an object slide on a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

Laboratory work: the right personal protective equipment is crucial

01.04.2020

When working with infectious materials and organisms in the laboratory, safe handling and appropriate training are of utmost importance. Another central component is personal protective equipment designed to prevent contact with tissue, liquids and aerosols and protect the wearer.
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Image: A researcher sits at a laboratory bench and puts gloves at his hands; Copyright: PantherMedia/dragana.stock@gmail.com

The safe laboratory – protection through technology

01.04.2020

When biomedical researchers or diagnosticians work with potentially contagious materials like cell cultures, blood or tissue, they need absolute protection from pathogens. Both safety measures in the workspace and the correct tools and materials are key here. Learn in our Topic of the Month what is important for protection in the lab and what a safe laboratory looks like.
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Image: Researcher with gloves and protective suit is working at a microscope; Copyright: PantherMedia/EvgeniyShkolenko

BSL-4 laboratories: highest levels of safety and protection

01.04.2020

Laboratories are sectioned into four biosafety levels to dictate the precautions required to isolate dangerous biological agents. The highest level of biological safety, BSL-4, is perhaps the most well-known when we think of containing pathogens and microbes. However, the fewest number of laboratories actually fall into the BSL-4 category.
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Image: Microscope next to a screen showing pictures of bacteria cultures; Copyright: PantherMedia/shmeljov

Laboratory safety: infection prevention in the work area

01.04.2020

What goes in, must not come out - and must also not cause harm to anyone working inside the lab. That's perhaps a nice way of summing up "laboratory safety" in one sentence - at least wherever pathogens are handled in biological and medical settings. The necessary laboratory safety precautions primarily depend on what is waiting "inside".
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12.12.2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08.11.2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04.11.2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Image: Modern diabetes therapies; Copyright: beta-web GmbH

Digital and personalized diabetes management

21.10.2019

Digital blood glucose measurement via a sensor on the arm, glucose values in an app and data evaluation with the help of software: diabetes experts, product specialists at Roche Diabetes Care Germany and a patient talk in our report on MEDICA.de about the future of diabetes treatment.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01.10.2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

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Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23.09.2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22.08.2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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