The potential of nasal cartilage in knee joint treatment
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Image: Illustration of a knee with the synthetic plug to treat pain; Copyright: Texas A&M Engineering

Texas A&M Engineering

Synthetic plugs offer an alternative to total knee replacements

05.06.2024

Dr. Melissa Grunlan, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University, is developing synthetic plugs to treat chronic knee pain and disabilities, offering an alternative to total knee replacements. This project is funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, a part of the National Institutes of Health.
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Image: Microscopic view of human skin tissue with the top layer of epidermal cells and underlying dermal layers stained in different colors for examination; Copyright: TERM/UKW

TERM/UKW

The potential of nasal cartilage in knee joint treatment

05.04.2024

At the University Hospital Wuerzburg, a promising new treatment for knee joint defects involves the use of nasal cartilage, and it's edging closer to approval with significant EU funding. The new method is using autologous cartilage from the nasal septum, an approach that may seem as enchanting as the term "ENCANTO" implies.
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Image: Person in sportswear sitting on an empty grandstand and holding his aching knee; Copyright: wayhomestudio

wayhomestudio

Orthopy: knee injury app's DIGA approval

21.11.2023

Patient information, relief for practitioners, support for rehabilitation exercises at home: the "Orthopy for knee injuries" app has recently become available as a prescription app to support anterior cruciate ligament tears and meniscus damage therapy. The app is backed by a dedicated team that has seen through its demanding approval process.
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Image: Elderly man with a walking aid follows a robot through a hallway; Copyright: TEDIRO

TEDIRO

Rehabilitation: THERY robot accompanies gait training on forearm supports

25.10.2023

It is 1.50 meters tall, weighs 60 kilograms, can reach a maximum speed of 0.8 meters per second and is called THERY. THERY is a mobile robot from the Ilmenau-based company TEDIRO, which enables patients to complete autonomous gait training on forearm supports without the assistance of a therapist.
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Image: knee joint highlighted in red on which the person has placed their hands; copyright: mihacreative

mihacreative

Personalized cartilage replacement helps with knee pain

27.06.2023

Knee osteoarthritis is a widespread form of arthrosis that limits those affected in their everyday lives. The wear and tear in the cartilage tissue often causes pain and movement restrictions. In order to improve treatment, researchers have developed a process that allows artificial cartilage tissue to be individually tailored to sufferers.
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Image: A patient is examined and measured for seated knee extension speed, quadriceps strength, knee range of motion, and knee pain; Copyright: Osaka Metropolitan University

Osaka Metropolitan University

Total knee arthroplasty: Faster knee for better walking

19.01.2023

Osaka Metropolitan University scientists have revealed that knee extension velocity while seated is a stronger predictor of walking performance than muscle strength in elderly patients after their total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery.
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Image: Physical therapists examine the results of knee surgery. The bandage is removed from the knee; Copyright: wutzkoh

wutzkoh

Older knee replacements as good as newer models, study shows

16.01.2023

Older knee replacement designs are just as effective as newer models – according to new research from the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital and University of East Anglia.
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Image: A man is standing inside a cube with three walls where a virtual game is projected and is touching a point at the wall; Copyright: ZHAW Departement Gesundheit, Bewegungslabor

ZHAW Departement Gesundheit, Bewegungslabor

Rehabilitation after sports injury: Gamification of exercises in the ExerCube

01.06.2022

Returning to a sport after injury can be demanding and arduous as athletes often need to undergo lengthy rehabilitation. Yet even after they have physically recovered from their injury, some may experience mental issues that can make it difficult to return to play and competition. Exercises that combine physical and mental training and challenges in a game setting can be an effective solution.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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