The potential of nasal cartilage in knee joint treatment
Menu

Image: Laboratory procedure for the cryopreservation of ovarian tissue; Copyright: Alessandro Winkler University Hospital Bonn (UKB)

Alessandro Winkler University Hospital Bonn (UKB)

First successful birth after vitrification of ovarian tissue in Europe

12.06.2024

A team at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) has established a modern method for the cryopreservation of ovarian tissue known as vitrification. This technique is used to preserve fertility before cancer therapies.
Read more
Image: Two people in white coats look at a monitor displaying data on genetic material; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Heart health: New tool developed to investigate telomere length

10.06.2024

A research team from Hannover Medical School (MHH) has developed a new molecular tool to investigate the influence of telomerase on the development of heart muscle cells. This study could have significant implications for the treatment and prevention of heart diseases.
Read more
Image: Scientist pipettes cells into a test tube in a a laboratory setting

New findings on short-term cultivated CAR T cells in cancer treatment

28.05.2024

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T (CAR T) cells are a breakthrough in immunotherapy, offering hope for blood cancer patients who have exhausted other options. These genetically modified cells are designed to attack cancer cells by recognizing specific antigens. The therapy has shown promise, particularly in treating B-cell leukemias and lymphomas.
Read more
Image: A researcher cultivates bacteria on an agar plate in a laboratory

Plasmids in the human intestine: new findings on their use as biomarkers

27.05.2024

The Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg has published a study in which an international research team reports on the discovery of a potential biomarker from the human intestine. This plasmid could be used in the future to detect fecal contamination or monitor inflammatory bowel diseases. The results were published in the journal Cell.
Read more
Image: Man sitting before a monitor showing data from a microscope in the foreground while a woman in the background is looking through a microscope; Copyright: MPIKG

MPIKG

Harnessing light to control cellular dynamics

23.05.2024

Researchers led by Rumiana Dimova at the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces have developed a technique that uses light to understand and control the inner dynamics of cells. By employing lights of different colors, they can alter the interactions within cellular components, offering a precise and non-invasive method to administer drugs directly into the cells.
Read more
Image: Two people looking at a tablet while wearing lab coats and protective glasses in a laboratory setting; Copyright: Hannes Woidich/DWI – Leibniz-Institut für Interaktive Materialien

Hannes Woidich/DWI – Leibniz-Institut für Interaktive Materialien

Sonopharmacology research: Andreas Herrmann awarded ERC Advanced Grant

14.05.2024

Professor Andreas Herrmann, a leading researcher at the DWI - Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials, has been granted an ERC Advanced Grant totaling €2.5 million by the European Research Council (ERC). This funding will support his research into the use of biocompatible ultrasound for medical applications over the next five years.
Read more
Image: Dorsal root ganglia expressing CGRP after muscle injury; Copyright: Mikaël M. Martino

Mikaël M. Martino

Unveiling the role of sensory neurons in tissue repair

10.05.2024

Research from Monash and Osaka Universities highlights the key role sensory neurons play in tissue repair and regeneration, marking a significant advancement for regenerative medicine.
Read more
Image: Depiction of the bioelectronic mesh in purple and green with red graphene sensors; Copyright: Gao et al., 10.1038/s41467-024-46636-7

Gao et al., 10.1038/s41467-024-46636-7

Bioelectronic mesh for cardiac tissue monitoring

30.04.2024

A team of engineers, led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has developed a cutting-edge bioelectronic mesh system integrated with graphene sensors to monitor both mechanical movement and electrical signals in lab-grown human cardiac tissue.
Read more
Image: A Fraunhofer IWS laboratory device is held by a person in blue gloves; Copyright: minkus-images.de/Fraunhofer IWS

minkus-images.de/Fraunhofer IWS

Insights into the development of metastases with miniature laboratories

22.04.2024

New developments at the Fraunhofer Institute for Material and Beam Technology IWS and partners enable improved research possibilities for cancer therapy using microphysiological systems.
Read more
Image: A researcher in a lab is carefully operating a 3D bioprinting machine that is used for creating bioengineered tissues; Copyright: Michelle Bixby/Penn State

Michelle Bixby/Penn State

3D-printed skin technique potentially enhances reconstructive surgery

15.04.2024

A breakthrough in reconstructive surgery may be on the horizon, as researchers develop a 3D-printed skin that integrates hair follicle precursors, leveraging adipose tissue for more natural results.
Read more
Image: Microscopic view of human skin tissue with the top layer of epidermal cells and underlying dermal layers stained in different colors for examination; Copyright: TERM/UKW

TERM/UKW

The potential of nasal cartilage in knee joint treatment

05.04.2024

At the University Hospital Wuerzburg, a promising new treatment for knee joint defects involves the use of nasal cartilage, and it's edging closer to approval with significant EU funding. The new method is using autologous cartilage from the nasal septum, an approach that may seem as enchanting as the term "ENCANTO" implies.
Read more
Image: The background is black and in the foreground, there are some sugar tubes and pastilles. Furthermore, there is the almost transparent organ-on-chip; Copyright: Silke Riegger, 3R-Center

Silke Riegger, 3R-Center

Diabetes: technology enhances molecular understanding

26.03.2024

With over seven million individuals in Germany affected by diabetes, science still faces challenges in drug research. However, under the leadership of Prof. Peter Loskill from both the NMI and the University of Tübingen, scientists have devised a method that markedly enhances our understanding at the molecular and cellular levels within the pancreas.
Read more
Image: There is a machine with a microscope. On the right side of the picture, there is a screen; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany

Advanced cell sorting with laser and AI

25.03.2024

The Fraunhofer Institutes for Laser Technology ILT and for Production Technology IPT developed a new AI-assisted high-throughput process that enhances cell isolation. This presents vast implications for personalized medicine, drug development, and clinical research.
Read more
Image: The picture shows a graphic of a pink colored mitochondria. The background is black.

Determine stroke risk early with tear fluid, mitochondria and AI

08.03.2024

Over 100 million people globally suffer from strokes annually, with ischemic strokes being the most common. However, many strokes go undetected, leading to severe consequences like dementia or depression. Prof. Olga Golubnitschaja from the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) has spearheaded a comprehensive approach to assess stroke risk early, focusing on predictive medicine.
Read more
Image: In the middle of this excerpt of a graphic there is a human body, visualizing the function of the underwater bio-adhesive for healing inner wounds; Copyright: POSTECH

POSTECH

Tailored medical adhesives for personalized healing

26.02.2024

POSTECH researchers led by Prof. Hyung Joon Cha, alongside colleagues, introduced groundbreaking personalized underwater bio-adhesive patches (CUBAP) derived from mussel adhesive proteins. This discovery, featured in Advanced Materials, improves biomedical adhesives, offering tailored internal healing solutions.
Read more
Image: The graphic visualizes the 3D bio-printing method. It shows two needles injecting hydrogels and fibers; Copyright: Universität Bayreuth

Universität Bayreuth

Advanced 3D printing technology improves tissue engineering

19.02.2024

Advancements in 3D printing technology are improving tissue engineering, offering promising prospects for the artificial production of biological tissues. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have developed a changing technique that combines hydrogels and fibers, opening new avenues for tissue fabrication.
Read more
Image: A stained micrograph of 3D primary human liver cell tissue modeling MASH. Areas of fibrosis are indicated in blue; Copyright: Viscient Biosciences

Viscient Biosciences

Revolutionizing liver disease research with 3D bioprinted model

07.02.2024

Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), previously known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a liver disease characterized by inflammation and scarring, reaching epidemic proportions with an estimated 1.5 percent to 6.5 percent of U.S. adults affected.
Read more
Image: Model of a female uterus with a fetus to illustrate growth and pregnancy development

Advancing reproductive medicine: Funding opportunities

29.01.2024

Jena University Hospital and Friedrich Schiller University Jena proudly announce the establishment of the Jena Center for Early Pregnancy and Reproductive Health (CEPRE), a dynamic interdisciplinary initiative aimed at fostering innovative research in women's reproductive health and early pregnancy.
Read more
Image: Close-up and 3D illustration of cream-colored molecules on a black background; Copyright: Determined

Determined

A sugar analysis could reveal different types of cancer

22.12.2023

In the future, a little saliva may be enough to detect an incipient cancer. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have developed an effective way to interpret the changes in sugar molecules that occur in cancer cells.
Read more
Image: AI-based segmentation of melanoma metastases in a tumor; Copyright: USZ

USZ

Understanding and fighting tumors better with new algorithms

21.12.2023

The University Hospital Zurich, the University of Zurich and the diagnostics company Roche are expanding their collaboration in cancer research. In the fully digitalized Morphomolecular Pathology Laboratory, they are developing algorithms that can further improve the effectiveness of immunotherapies.
Read more
Image: Private lecturer Dr. Jonas Schupp sits next to a microscope and smiles for the camera; Copyright: privat

privat

Chronic lung diseases: funding for precision medicine

20.12.2023

Associate Professor Dr Jonas Schupp receives funding for his research into chronic lung diseases.
Read more
Image: Blue and white logo from the EU consortium CERTAINTY; Copyright: Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

CERTAINTY: virtual twin for improved cancer immunotherapies

20.12.2023

Together with partners from science, industry and the healthcare sector, the project team led by the Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI aims to develop a virtual twin that will improve treatment with personalized cancer immunotherapies in the future.
Read more
Image: Cell culture plates in an incubator; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Detecting side effects of new drugs on the heart more efficiently

12.12.2023

Scientists at the University Medical Center and the University of Göttingen have developed a novel method to predict the side effects of new drugs and therapeutic approaches on the heart more efficiently.
Read more
Image: A sample is placed in a centrifuge by a person wearing personal protective clothing; Copyright: microgen

microgen

TissueGrinder: Improved cell analyses via enhanced-quality sample preparation

07.12.2023

A new method for examining tissue samples could change the way we diagnose and treat cancer. Researchers at the Max Planck and Fraunhofer IPA have developed an automated system based on the principle of enzyme-free tissue processing and the mechanical deformability of individual cells.
Read more
Image: Optical resolution of the latest super-resolution microscopy methods on biomolecules: artistic diagram; Copyright: Universität Würzburg

Universität Würzburg

PicoRuler: Molecular rulers for high-resolution microscopy

06.12.2023

A team from the Rudolf Virchow Zentrum – Center for Integrative and Translational Bioimaging at Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg, led by Dr Gerti Beliu and Professor Markus Sauer, presents a groundbreaking advance for the world of high-resolution fluorescence microscopy.
Read more
Image: 3D simulation of an active material in a geometric shape resembling a dividing cell; Copyright: Singh et al. Physics of Fluids (2023) / MPI-CBG

Singh et al. Physics of Fluids (2023) / MPI-CBG

New computer code for mechanics of tissues and cells in three dimensions

28.11.2023

Open-source supercomputer algorithm predicts patterning and dynamics of living materials and enables studying their behavior in space and time.
Read more
Image: Three men stand in the UCD Conway Institute; Copyright: Vincent Hoban, University College Dublin

Vincent Hoban, University College Dublin

World’s first commercial deployment of novel soft X-ray microscope

03.11.2023

SiriusXT Ltd, an Irish technology SME, announced the world’s first commercial deployment of the SXT-100, the company’s unique table-top Soft X-ray Microscope with applications in disease research and the drug discovery process, at the UCD Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research at University College Dublin.
Read more
Image: Man with long hair and olive green sweater posing: Kristian Franze with brain model; Copyright: Stephan Spangenberg

Stephan Spangenberg

UNFOLD research project receives prestigious ERC Synergy Grant

01.11.2023

Physicist and veterinarian Prof. Dr. Kristian Franze, Director at the Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin (MPZPM) and Director of the Institute for Medical Physics and Microtissue Engineering at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has been awarded an ERC Synergy Grant.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a human gray blue eye; Copyright: David Callahan

David Callahan

Eye implant may be used to treat diabetes

27.10.2023

Researchers in Sweden have developed a microscale device for implantation in the eye, which presents new opportunities for cell-based treatment of diabetes and other diseases.
Read more
Image: Diagram of synapse formation: Glowing protein shows the development of synaptic vesicles; Copyright: Barth van Rossum, FMP

Barth van Rossum, FMP

Microscopy and fluorescence show how synapses are formed

23.10.2023

How are synapses formed, those points of contact that allow the transmission of information from one neuron to the other? Working with an international team, researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have now uncovered a crucial mechanism and elucidated the identity of the axonal transport vesicles that generates synapses.
Read more
Image: A man in a suit, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Ahrens, posing in a bright hallway; Copyright: BIPS

BIPS

White paper: improving record linkage for health research

16.10.2023

In Germany, it is currently difficult to link health data from different sources. The Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology – BIPS is now presenting a white paper on this topic.
Read more
Image: light brown bone screw Shark Screw; Copyright: DIZG

DIZG

Faster return to health with bone screws made from donated tissue

16.10.2023

During fracture treatment, screws are frequently used to join bone fragments. Traditional metal screws can necessitate additional surgeries during follow-up treatment, extending the healing process. Shark Screw® bone screw, crafted from human tissue, presents significant benefits in this context.
Read more
Image: Female doctor searches patient information from the medical records system using a computer; Copyright: Yulia_Panova

Yulia_Panova

ScPoli enables multi-scale representations of cells and samples

12.10.2023

Computer scientists at Helmholtz Munich developed a generative model named ScPoli that performs data integration of high-quality large-scale datasets of single cells.
Read more
Image: “Organ-on-chip” symbol image. Close-up of a biochip on a black background; Copyright: NMI

NMI

Menopause: leveraging organ-on-chip technology for new insights

09.10.2023

Addressing the impact of female menopause on dynamic resilience and exploring preventive and therapeutic strategies is the aim of an international and interdisciplinary research group led by Prof. Dr. Peter Loskill from the NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen.
Read more
Image: Dr. Marina Dziuba in the laboratory with bacterial cultures to produce magnetic nanoparticles; Copyright: Christian Wißler/UBT

Christian Wißler/UBT

EXIST funding for bacterial magnetic nanoparticles

28.09.2023

BioMagnetix uses bacterial magnetic nanoparticles as innovative materials for biomedical applications. The founding team aims to develop and continuously improve high-quality and highly functional magnetic nanoparticles for imaging techniques and therapeutic purposes, such as cancer treatment.
Read more
Image: Cellular Cartography - Charting the Sizes and Abundance of Our Body's Cells Reveals Mathematical Order Underlying Life; Copyright: MPIMIS

MPIMIS

Cellular cartography: sizes and abundance revealed

27.09.2023

An international team of scientists has created the first comprehensive index of human cells, mapping the sizes and abundance of all cell types across the entire body.
Read more
Image: Microscopy image and artistic representation of the CHOOSE system in a human brain organoid; Copyright: Knoblich Lab / IMBA-IMP Graphics

Knoblich Lab / IMBA-IMP Graphics

Autism: brain organoid shows genetic bases

21.09.2023

Technology, developed by researchers from the Knoblich group at the Institute of Molecular Biotechnology (IMBA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the Treutlein group at ETH Zurich, permits the identification of vulnerable cell types and gene regulatory networks that underlie autism spectrum disorders.
Read more
Image: Female engineer in laboratory clothing inspects a small circuit board; Copyright: wosunan

wosunan

Microrobots: opportunities for cancer treatment and wound healing

18.09.2023

A group of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed the world’s first microrobot (“microbot”) capable of navigating within groups of cells and stimulating individual cells.
Read more
Image: Blue immune cells wandering from bottom to top on a black background; Copyright: Jonna Alanko/Science Immunology

Jonna Alanko/Science Immunology

How immune cells migrate

11.09.2023

When fighting disease, our immune cells need to reach their target quickly. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) now discovered that immune cells actively generate their own guidance system to navigate through complex environments.
Read more
Image: A bald man in a white coat stands in a laboratory and looks over at other people; Copyright: Joakim Palmqvist

Joakim Palmqvist

Advanced biosensors to detect tumors, viruses and bacterial diseases

06.09.2023

Linnaeus University is partnering with industry and healthcare to develop advanced biosensors, investing SEK 35 million in a project aimed at faster and cost-effective diagnoses of aggressive lung cancer, viral, and bacterial diseases, potentially enabling self-testing at home.
Read more
Image: Close-up of two hands in blue gloves preparing a dose of vaccine by syringe; Copyright: Beate Armbruster/University Hospital of Tuebingen

Beate Armbruster/University Hospital of Tuebingen

Protection for cancer patients

05.09.2023

Tübingen T-cell activator offers protection against coronaviruses in immunocompromised patients
Read more
Image: Two men and a woman in white coats work in a laboratory with reaction vessels; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

More impact against cancer

04.09.2023

MHH molecular physician Professor Dr. Dr. Schambach wants to use genetically modified natural killer cells to find new therapeutic options against three particularly malignant cancers. The EU is funding the project with 3.8 million euros
Read more
Image: Illustration of a protein structure with its amino acid complexes; Copyright: Kateryna Maksymenko

Kateryna Maksymenko

Innovative computational approach helps design proteins for cancer treatment

31.08.2023

A joint team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen and the University Hospital Tübingen has now developed and tested a new computational method to greatly speed up the necessary energy calculations.
Read more
Image: A man and woman pose seated with a dummy syringe that says

Anne Günther/Uni Jena

Timing is key in cortisone treatment of inflammation

30.08.2023

A special type of starch could soon be used as an excipient in medicine to improve the treatment of patients.
Read more
Image: Close-up of microtiter plates that are filled with several pipettes; Copyright: LMU

LMU

Immunotherapy: Antibody kit to fight tumors

25.08.2023

A new study highlights the potential of artificial DNA structures that, when fitted with antibodies, instruct the immune system to specifically target cancerous cells.
Read more
Image: Microscopic image: cultivation of muscle stem cells and fibers from reprogrammed connective tissue cells; Copyright: ETH Zürich / Bar-Nur Lab

ETH Zürich / Bar-Nur Lab

Building muscle in the lab

23.08.2023

A new method allows large quantities of muscle stem cells to be safely obtained in cell culture.
Read more
Image: Diagram of a fully synthetic cell-instructive matrix with programmable mechanical properties; Copyright: Elisha Krieg und Yu-Hsuan Peng

Elisha Krieg und Yu-Hsuan Peng

Programmable DNA hydrogels for advanced cell culture and personalized medicine

22.08.2023

The team of Dr. Elisha Krieg at the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden has developed a dynamic DNA-crosslinked matrix (DyNAtrix) by combining classical synthetic polymers with programmable DNA crosslinkers.
Read more
Image: Jonathan Holzman and Alexis Guidi are exploring the potential of terahertz radiation to improve the quality of medical diagnostic imaging; Copyright: UBC Okanagan

UBC Okanagan

Riding a wave to better medical diagnosis

18.08.2023

New UBC Okanagan research takes aim at improving diagnostic imaging
Read more
Image: A doctor palpates a patient's lymph nodes in the examination room; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Study: Fluidity predicts aggressiveness of cancerous tumours

17.08.2023

Researchers discovered that the consistency of a tumor can have a decisive influence on the further course of cancer.
Read more
Image: Immune cells in blue and vessels in pink in the bone marrow of the skull; Copyright: Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

A new ally in fighting brain diseases: our very own skull

16.08.2023

Alzheimer's, stroke, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases cause severe damage due to neuroinflammation mediated by immune cells.
Read more
Image: Uršula Vide from the Institute of Biochemistry at TU Graz working in the lab; Copyright: TU Graz

TU Graz

Light as on-off switch for enzymes

10.08.2023

Researchers at TU Graz have gained new insights into the functioning of a protein found in bacteria, whose enzymatic activity is activated by blue light.
Read more
Image:Upon irradiation by near infra-red light, Anti-PD-L1 specifically binds to the cancer cell, while immunostimulants activate T and dendritic cells; Copyright: Eijiro Miyako from JAIST

Eijiro Miyako from JAIST

Cancer photoimmunotherapy: novel liquid metal nanoparticles

10.08.2023

JAIST researchers create liquid metal nanoparticles (PEG-IMIQ-LM) for cancer treatment, merging photothermal therapy and immunotherapy. Disintegration delivers immunomodulants and tracks cancer cells in real-time. Immune checkpoint inhibitor enhances cancer removal. Promising for future cancer theranostics, with clinical trials anticipated in a decade.
Read more
Image: Innovative 3D cell culture modell; Copyright: University of Nottingham

University of Nottingham

PeptiMatrix: Platform could replace use of animals in research

09.08.2023

PeptiMatrix is the latest spin-out company from the University of Nottingham, providing access to an innovative 3D cell culture platform that aims to replace the use of animals in research.
Read more
Image: It shows the activation of a chemical signaling pathway (ERK pathway; top-right) merged with a simulation of 2D cell areas (bottom-left) in a monolayer of cells; Copyright: Hannezo Group | ISTA

Hannezo Group | ISTA

Cell dynamics: how cells talk to each other

26.07.2023

Like us, cells communicate. Well, in their own special way. Using waves as their common language, cells tell one another where and when to move.
Read more
Image: Image showing the preparation of hydrogels that enhance the viability of NK cells; Copyright: KIMM

KIMM

3D bioprinting technology to be used for removing cancer cells

14.07.2023

KIMM develops the world’s first 3D bioprinting technology that enhances the function of NK immune cells. The new technology is expected to improve effectiveness of cancer treatment.
Read more
Image: Woman in a laboratory collecting blood samples; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

Molecular tumor profiling: blood test to determine the optimal cancer therapy

11.07.2023

If a tumor is diagnosed, tissue samples are usually investigated to determine the molecular tumor profile for personalized cancer treatment. However, tissue biopsy cannot be performed in all affected individuals. Therefore, the University Hospital Zurich has licensed a liquid biopsy for the analysis of more than 300 genes and offers this test as a modern diagnostic method to tumor patients.
Read more
Image: clock in the background with scattered pills in the foreground; Copyright: rawf8

rawf8

Improved cancer therapy: TimeTeller shows what makes the body tick

06.07.2023

Using the internal clock to optimize chemotherapies in cancer treatment - that is the goal of the start-up TimeTeller. If the drugs are administered at the ideal time of day for chemotherapy, it can reduce side effects and improve the effect. TimeTeller has developed a method for determining the internal clock to make this possible.
Read more
Image: Cross-sectional electron micrographs of individual nerve fibers in MS brain biopsies; Axons sheathed with myelin showing increasingly damage ; Copyright: Leipzig University

Leipzig University

Multiple sclerosis: Myelin may be detrimental to nerve fibres

05.07.2023

Researchers at Leipzig University and Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have discovered that myelin, which was previously thought to be solely protective, can actually threaten the survival of the axons.
Read more
Image: A woman with dark hair and a white coat sits in a laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Sickle cell disease: portable tool for diagnosis, monitoring receives U.S. patent

30.06.2023

Using microfluidics, flow cytometry and electrical impedance, Sarah Du recently received a patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for a novel invention that will offer patients a better way to manage their disease.
Read more
Image: Two men and three women pose in white coats in a laboratory; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

New biomarkers of non-small cell lung cancer discovered

27.06.2023

Researchers of the University of Barcelona and the Institute of Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) have identified new biomarkers for non-small cell lung cancer, the most common lung cancer.
Read more
Image: Micrograph of bacterial biofilms; Copyright: Buntan2019

Buntan2019

Biofilms: Infection model from the 3D printer

21.06.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) have developed a novel method to place biofilms on lung cells in the laboratory. The model system produced by means of "bioprinting" should help to better understand infection processes and assist in the development of new active substances.
Read more
Image: Graphic of a human with brain and spine, neural connections into one hand, a neuron that is stimulated by a field; Copyright: HZDR/Sahneweiß

HZDR/Sahneweiß

Magnetic stimulation: potential therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases

19.06.2023

Motor neurons in healthy individuals send signals to the skeletal muscles. ALS, however, is currently an incurable, neurodegenerative disease in which motor neurons are severely damaged and can therefore no longer transmit these signals. An interdisciplinary team at HZDR has proven in cell experiments that magnetic fields can restore impaired motor neurons.
Read more
Image: Viral Microscope View. 3D illustration of a corona virus in blue color; Copyright: maxxyustas

maxxyustas

Corona: The virus needs only a single door opener

15.06.2023

Why is the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus able to spread so efficiently? Various hypotheses are still circulating in the scientific community. A group of researchers from Würzburg has now found groundbreaking answers.
Read more
Image: A puzzle-like model of a lung made of building blocks on a red background; Copyright: yavdat

yavdat

AI enables first integrated single-cell atlas of the lung

15.06.2023

Can a human organ be mapped on a single-cell level to learn more about each individual cell? And can we learn how different these cells are from person to person? Helmholtz Munich researchers and their collaborators have taken up this challenge and developed the Human Lung Cell Atlas using artificial intelligence (AI)-based techniques.
Read more
Image: Micrograph: Certain immune cells called microglia (yellow) remove amyloid plaques (magenta) in the brain of an Alzheimer's mouse; Copyright: MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

Dementia: poorly insulated nerve cells promote Alzheimer's disease in old age

08.06.2023

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have shown that defective myelin actively promotes disease-related changes in Alzheimer’s. Slowing down age-related myelin damage could open up new ways to prevent the disease or delay its progression in the future.
Read more
Image: Using data from magnetic resonance imaging, the researchers were able to compare the brains of healthy and fibromyalgia sufferers; Copyright: Benjamin Mosch

Benjamin Mosch

Imaging: MRI shows how fibromyalgia changes the brain

05.06.2023

A team from the LWL Clinic for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, has investigated the brain changes that are related to the disorder.
Read more
Image: Woman with glasses and gray-brown hair, Carole Planchette, stands by a pillar; Copyright: Fotogenia - Renate Trummer

Fotogenia - Renate Trummer

Tissue Engineering: TU Graz revolutionises production of biocompatible microfibres

02.06.2023

Using a newly developed method for the efficient and cost-effective production of biocompatible microfibres, the production of autologous skin and organs can be significantly accelerated. Responsible for the development are Carole Planchette and her team from TU Graz.
Read more
Image: Two women, Wiebke Möbius and Sophie Hümmert, at a white electron microscope; Copyright: Swen Pförtner MPI

Swen Pförtner MPI

Multiple Sclerosis: structural changes in brain tissue promote inflammatory processes

31.05.2023

A German-Dutch research team has shown that ultrastructural changes in healthy areas in the white matter of MS patients make the tissue more susceptible to inflammation and the formation of lesions
Read more
Image: The research team: three men and one woman pose next to a screen and a microscope; Copyright: NTU Singapore

NTU Singapore

Why wavy wounds heal faster than straight wounds

19.05.2023

Wavy wounds heal faster than straight wounds because shapes influence cell movements, a team of researchers at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has found.
Read more
Image: A man in a gray jacket and white shirt, Miroslaw Bober, smiles at the camera; Copyright: University of Surrey

University of Surrey

UK AI world leader in identifying location and expression of proteins

18.05.2023

A new advanced artificial intelligence (AI) system has shown world-leading accuracy and speed in identifying protein patterns within individual cells.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a WFIRM gyroid-shaped construct on a blue-gloved hand; Copyright: WFIRM

WFIRM

Bioprinting research makes history when it soars to the ISS

17.05.2023

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) will make history this month when the first bioprinted solid tissue constructs soar to the International Space Station (ISS) on board the next all private astronaut mission by commercial space leader Axiom Space.
Read more
Image: Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel and Vanessa Trossmann in a laboratory for the microscopic examination of cell structures; Copyright: UBT / Chr. Wißler.

UBT / Chr. Wißler.

Regenerative medicine: cell-specific properties of novel spider silk materials

12.05.2023

Materials made of spider silk can be specifically modified or processed in such a way that living cells of a certain type adhere to them, grow and proliferate. This has been discovered by researchers at the University of Bayreuth under the direction of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel.
Read more
Image: Brain immune cells (“microglia”) in culture exposed to amyloid-beta proteins which are involved in Alzheimer’s disease; Copyright: DZNE/AG Milovanovic

DZNE/AG Milovanovic

Tuning brain cells with light

11.05.2023

An international research team, comprising scientists from University Hospital Bonn, DZNE, the Netherlands, and the US has been awarded a US$ 1.3 million grant by the “Human Frontier Science Program” to investigate brain immune cells and manipulate them via light irradiation.
Read more
Image: Baby mannequin connected to a ventilator in an incubator; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

Messe Düsseldorf

With stem cell model on the trail of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

09.05.2023

Researchers have designed a new stem cell model to study congenital diaphragmatic hernia in newborns with underdeveloped lungs. They were able to isolate stem cells from the fluid that is suctioned from the baby’s lungs and normally gets discarded and use them as a foundation for the model.
Read more
Image: Microscopic image of bone-marrow cells of a multiple myeloma patient.; Copyright: Berend Snijder Lab / ETH Zurich

Berend Snijder Lab / ETH Zurich

How to fight blood cancer more effectively

05.05.2023

Despite approved treatments being available, multiple myeloma remains incurable. But researchers at ETH Zurich and University Hospital Zurich set out to improve treatment outcomes by testing hundreds of existing therapeutics outside the body to predict their effectiveness.
Read more
Image: Modern ECG machine in the hospital emergency room for diagnosis of a heart attack; Copyright: nd3000

nd3000

Atrial fibrillation: Targeted drug therapy approach discovered for the first time

04.05.2023

When the heart gets out of rhythm, characteristic processes occur in the heart muscle cells. Among other things, the currents of electrically charged particles (ions) change. In chronic atrial fibrillation, one of these currents is reduced.
Read more
Image: Bochum research team: Burkhard Pleger (left) and Timo Dreier pose for the camera in white coats; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

Effects of brain stimulation amenable to conditioning

28.04.2023

Researchers at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, have successfully implemented a special form of classical conditioning. They showed on a group of 75 people that effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be triggered solely by listening to a tone.
Read more
Image: Daniel Aili, professor at the Department of Physics, man with brown hair and glasses, smiles at the camera; Copyright: Magnus Johansson

Magnus Johansson

Wound dressing reveals infection

26.04.2023

A nanocellulose wound dressing that can reveal early signs of infection without interfering with the healing process has been developed by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden.
Read more
Image: Medical samples are treated with a plasma pen; Copyright: INP

INP

Plasma against precancerous skin lesions: EU funds international doctoral candidates network

24.04.2023

Under the leadership of the Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), the international doctoral candidates network PlasmACT is investigating the use of medical gas plasma technology as a treatment method.
Read more
Image: Illustration of wounds on cultured skin cells heal while stimulated with electric current; Copyright: Science Brush | Hassan A. Tahini

Science Brush | Hassan A. Tahini

How electricity can heal wounds three times as fast

21.04.2023

Using electric stimulation, researchers in a project at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and the University of Freiburg, Germany, have developed a method that speeds up the healing process, making wounds heal three times faster.
Read more
Image: An example of virtual staining of tissue. Unstained tissue on the left, chemically stained tissue in the middle and virtually stained tissue on the right; Copyright: Pekka Ruusuvuori

Pekka Ruusuvuori

AI-based method to replace chemical staining of tissue

21.04.2023

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence-based method for virtual staining of histopathological tissue samples as a part of the Nordic ABCAP consortium.
Read more
Image: A human brain organoid (red) grows on the hammock-like structure of a mesh MEA; Copyright: Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine

Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine

Microelectrode array: hammock for brain organoids

20.04.2023

Novel microelectrode array system enables long-term cultivation and electrophysiological analyses of brain organoids.
Read more
Image: Schematic illustration of organoid bioprinting with artificial intelligence ; Copyright: Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Cyborg and Bionic Systems

Bioprinting technology and AI enable high quality in vitro models

19.04.2023

In the process of organoid manufacturing, bioprinting technology not only facilitates the creation and maintenance of complex biological 3D shapes and structures, but also allows for standardization and quality control during production.
Read more
Image: Example image for the spatially resolved analysis of a gene on a section of kidney tissue; Copyright: Daniel Kokotek

Daniel Kokotek

New method makes rare cell types visible

13.04.2023

In cooperation with Helmholtz Munich, Professor Matthias Meier from the Centre for Biotechnology and Biomedicine at Leipzig University and his research group have developed a new, effective and comparatively inexpensive method to make rare cell types, cell communication types and disease patterns visible in tissue.
Read more
Image: Tissue engineering, tweezers with a solution in a laboratory vessel; Copyright: Fraunhofer-Translationszentrum/Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer-Translationszentrum/Fraunhofer ISC

SAPs4Tissue: human tissue models with customized biomaterials

12.04.2023

In a joint project of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, and the Translational Center for Regenerative Therapies at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Würzburg, scientific principles and biomaterials for the standardized production of valid tissue models are to be developed.
Read more
Image: A woman with dark hair, dark glasses and a white coat stands in front of a door frame in a laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Daniel Delang / TUM

Daniel Delang / TUM

Mini-heart in a Petri dish: organoid emulates development of the human heart

11.04.2023

The team working with Alessandra Moretti, Professor of Regenerative Medicine in Cardiovascular Disease, has developed a method for making a sort of "mini-heart" using pluripotent stem cells.
Read more
Image: ENT doctor or dentist with a medical instrument examining the oral cavity; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

ONWARD Medical NV

PANDORA test could pave the way for better oral cancer detection

06.04.2023

Surrey scientists have developed a proof-of-concept test called PANDORA that was shown to be over 92% accurate at identifying patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The test was also shown to be more than 80% accurate at identifying patients with pre-cancer or oral epithelial dysplasia (OED).
Read more
Image: Three men and a woman in white lab coats pose for the camera in a laboratory; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

Microfluidics physics-based device to predict cancer therapy response

06.04.2023

A team of experts has designed a microfluidic device called microfluidic dynamic BH3 profiling (μDBP) that predicts the effectiveness of cancer treatment quickly and automatically.
Read more
Image: Study co-authors in white coats (from left) Caleb Bashor, Antonios Mikos and Letitia Chim; Copyright: Gustavo Raskosky/Rice University

Gustavo Raskosky/Rice University

Upgraded tumor model optimizes search for cancer therapies

27.03.2023

Rice University researchers developed an upgraded tumor model that houses osteosarcoma cells beside immune cells known as macrophages inside a three-dimensional structure engineered to mimic bone. Using the model, bioengineer Antonios Mikos and collaborators found that the body’s immune response can make tumor cells more resistant to chemotherapy.
Read more
Image: A woman with blond hair in a white coat sits in a laboratory and works with Petri dishes; Copyright: University of the West of Scotland

University of the West of Scotland

Radiology: Research could improve cancer treatment

22.03.2023

UWS School of Computing Engineering and Physical Sciences are developing breakthrough investigations into advanced radiation treatment technique, after receiving funding from Cancer Research UK RadNet – the charity's radiation research network.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a female hand holding the orange ribbon symbolizing the fight against leukemia; Copyright: JoPanwatD

JoPanwatD

AI finds targets for CAR-T cell therapy against acute myeloid leukemia

20.03.2023

Unlike other forms of blood cancer, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cannot currently be treated with CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The reason is that specific molecular targets with which certain immune cells could specifically target AML cells are lacking, which would permit the immune system to attack cancer.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a scientist wearing protective clothing looking through a microscope; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Smart microscopy works out where to take the picture

16.03.2023

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a software solution for smart, data-driven microscopy, which makes this possible.
Read more
Image: Detailed measurement of how the motor protein kinesin-1 (red) walks on microtubules (white); Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Further advance in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

16.03.2023

Scientists led by Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have developed a super-resolution microscope with a spatio-temporal precision of one nanometer per millisecond.
Read more
Image: Black cones show water molecules being oriented in the electric field at the interface with the lipid; Copyright: Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Standard model of electroporation refuted

15.03.2023

Technology developed at the University of Freiburg enables experimental test. The new findings could help to improve the transport of active substances into cells
Read more
Image: A baby with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia is ventilated in an incubator; Copyright: Colourbox

Colourbox

Stem cell model: research into malformation of the newborn lung

15.03.2023

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is one of the deadliest birth defects. To better understand and treat this condition in the future, an international team of researchers involving Leipzig University Hospital designed a new cell model in the laboratory and tested a drug therapy on it.
Read more
Image: Medical research Close-up of a microplate; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

RIANA: Viennese start-up develops novel, precise anti-cancer drugs

14.03.2023

The technological basis is a proprietary platform technology for the discovery of drugs that target cancer-causing protein-protein interactions (PPIs).
Read more
Image: A small dark box, a mobile impedance spectrometer; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer ISC

Innovative in vitro eye irritation test to replace standard animal testing

10.03.2023

Researchers at the Translational Center for Regenerative Therapies TLC-RT of the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC want to work with partners to replace animal testing.
Read more
Image: Microscopic image: Mouse lymph nodes with colored fluorescent markers; Copyright: AG Hoelzel/UKB

AG Hoelzel/UKB

Artificial intelligence to help tumor immunology

09.03.2023

Developing methods to predict the nature of the tumor microenvironment is the goal of researchers from the Clusters of Excellence ImmunoSensation2 and the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics (HCM) led by Prof. Kevin Thurley at the University of Bonn.
Read more
Image: Two men in white laboratory clothing are working on new quantum light modules; Copyright: FBH/P. Immerz

FBH/P. Immerz

Entangled photon pairs to help fighting cancer

06.03.2023

The recently launched QEED project aims to significantly reduce measurement time in clinical cancer diagnostics by developing a spectrally resolved imaging technique based on entangled photon pairs. FBH scientists will develop the required diode lasers and quantum light modules.
Read more
Image: Photograph of the semitransparent hydrogel used in this study; Copyright: Satoshi Tanikawa, et al. 2023

Satoshi Tanikawa, et al. 2023

Healing the brain: hydrogels enable neuronal tissue growth

03.03.2023

Synthetic hydrogels were shown to provide an effective scaffold for neuronal tissue growth in areas of brain damage, providing a possible approach for brain tissue reconstruction.
Read more
Image: Portrait of a researcher with PPE equipment analyzing brain activity; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

New artificial model validates antibodies ability to reach the brain

03.03.2023

A research group at Uppsala University has developed a simple and effective artificial blood-brain barrier model that can be used to determine how well antibody-based therapies can enter the brain.
Read more
Image: Pipette adding sample to stem cell cultures growing in pots for stem cell implantation; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Electrodes grown in the brain – paving the way for future therapies for neurological disorders

02.03.2023

The boundaries between biology and technology are becoming blurred. Researchers at Linköping, Lund, and Gothenburg universities in Sweden have successfully grown electrodes in living tissue using the body’s molecules as triggers. The result, published in the journal Science, paves the way for the formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.
Read more
Image: The photo shows the scanning of a blood sample in a laboratory at CiiM.; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

What leads to severe COVID-19 diseases?

01.03.2023

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 leads to severe disease in some people, while others do not get ill or only experience mild disease. But why is this the case? Unfortunately, we do not know exactly. We do know that an overactive innate immune system is causing severe COVID-19 disease, but it is unclear how this is regulated.
Read more
Image: Two men and a woman stand in front of a building and smile for the camera; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

AI with infrared imaging enables precise colon cancer diagnostics

23.02.2023

Researchers at the Centre for Protein Diagnostics PRODI at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, are using artificial intelligence in combination with infrared imaging to optimally tailor colon cancer therapy to individual patients.
Read more
Image: Immune cell trafficking in diabetic cataract formation.; Copyright: HAWK

HAWK

Imaging: role of immune cells in early diabetic cataract development

22.02.2023

The team of researchers, led by Prof. Dr. Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Director of the Molecular Biomarkers Nano-Imaging Laboratory (MBNI), in collaboration with Professor Dr. Christoph Rußmann, Dean of the Health Campus and a Visiting Professor at MBNI, found early signs of damage in the eye before the onset of type 2 diabetes.
Read more
Image: Young female scientist in protective mask and glasses examining chemical or biological sample with microscope in laboratory; Copyright: Pressmaster

Pressmaster

AI analyses cell movement under the microscope

22.02.2023

The enormous amount of data obtained by filming biological processes using a microscope has previously been an obstacle for analyses.
Read more
Image: The use of sound waves to create a pressure field to print particles; Copyright: Kai Melde, MPI für medizinische Forschung

Kai Melde, MPI für medizinische Forschung

Creating 3D objects with sound

17.02.2023

Scientists from the Micro, Nano and Molecular Systems Lab at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research and the Institute for Molecular Systems Engineering and Advanced Materials at Heidelberg University have created a new technology to assemble matter in 3D.
Read more
Image: Fluorescence staining of Arlo cells. The image shows the overlay of a staining of cell nuclei (gray) and the tight junction protein 1 (blue); Copyright: HIPS/Boese

HIPS/Boese

New cell model for the human lung

16.02.2023

A team led by Prof Claus-Michael Lehr of the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) has developed a novel human lung cell line that should enable much more accurate predictions of the behavior of active substances or dosage forms in humans than previous systems.
Read more
Image: A white electrospun Renacer membrane (5 x 5 cm) on a black background; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer ISC

Bioresorbable membrane for healing internal and external wounds

10.02.2023

Fraunhofer researchers have succeeded in using the bioresorbable silica gel Renacer to produce an electrospun membrane that is neither cytotoxic to cells nor genotoxic.
Read more
Image: Close-up of the healing process of a corneal ulcer, postoperative results in vivo; Copyright: POSTECH

POSTECH

Treating cornea ulcers with diagnostic light instead of corneal transplantation

08.02.2023

Recently, a Korean joint research team from POSTECH-KKU has developed a new tissue adhesive that restores the damaged cornea by simply filling it and exposing it to light.
Read more
Image: Human blood cells, highly magnified under the microscope; Copyright: PeterHermesFurian

PeterHermesFurian

"Spleen-on-a-chip" yields insight into sickle cell disease

06.02.2023

With this microfluidic device, researchers modeled how sickled blood cells clog the spleen’s filters, leading to a potentially life-threatening condition.
Read more
Image: During their journey through the blood, blood proteins accumulate on the surface of nanoparticles. 3D illustration; Copyright: MPI-P

MPI-P

New insights into the utilization of nanotechnology-based drugs

01.02.2023

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now followed the path of such a particle into a cell using a combination of several microscopy methods. They were able to observe a cell-internal process that effectively separates blood components and nanoparticles.
Read more
Bild: DNA strand assembly from different elements. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

The architecture of shattered genomes

27.01.2023

Hunting for disease clues in the dark matter of our DNA. Scientists have reconstructed the chromosomes of patients with an extremely high number of aberrations in their genome that could alter the expression of nearby genes and potentially cause disease. Their results were published in Nature Communications in October 2022.
Read more
Image: Dr Christoph Schultheiss determines blood values for Long COVID in the research laboratory; Copyright: Universitätsmedizin Halle

Universitätsmedizin Halle

Long COVID: blood values indicate reprogramming of immune cells

26.01.2023

The underlying mechanisms of long COVID are not yet fully understood. Molecular clues to different subgroups of long COVID have now been provided by a research group at University Medicine Halle.
Read more
Image: An elderly man sits at an eye diagnostic device and is examined by a doctor; Copyright: Beachbumledford

Beachbumledford

Controlled manufacture, storage and freezing of artificial retinal cells

25.01.2023

Fraunhofer researchers have now developed a new method for the production and clinical application of stem-cell-based retinal implants, which could contribute towards the successful treatment of AMD.
Read more
Image: Researcher examines cell culture plates under the microscope; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

18.01.2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
Read more
Image: Two men and two women are standing in a laboratory and examining a small apparatus (microphysiological system); Copyright: Amac Garbe/Fraunhofer IWS

Amac Garbe/Fraunhofer IWS

Radioactive substances fight cancer in the mini-lab

13.01.2023

Two Dresden research institutes want to reduce the number of animal experiments in radiopharmaceutical research with a new idea.
Read more
Image: Small moldecules - illustration in orange; Copyright: Aalto University

Aalto University

Gaining unprecedented view of small molecules by machine learning

06.01.2023

A new tool to identify small molecules offers benefits for diagnostics, drug discovery and fundamental research. A new machine learning model will help scientists identify small molecules, with applications in medicine, drug discovery and environmental chemistry.
Read more
Image: small empty test tubes with lids in different colors; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

RNA technologies make targeted immune activation possible

03.11.2022

MEDICA 2022 is right around the corner, ready to deliver insights into the advancements and innovations in laboratory medicine. One of the key topics of the MEDICA LABMED Forum is RNA technologies and the wide range of applications that involve cell biology. RNA technologies not only enable Covid-19 vaccines but promise an array of treatment options for genetic diseases, in and beyond oncology.
Read more
Image: Scientist works with medical test tube to analyze green liquid; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Diagnosing breast cancer through liquid biopsy

22.09.2022

Breast cancer diagnosis usually includes invasive testing with tissue biopsies. The samples have to be extracted from the cancerous tissue or cells. To make the process easier on the patients, the project LIBIMEDOTS is currently developing a different approach with liquid biopsy technology.
Read more
Image: Thierry Nordmann (left) & Lisa Schweizer are standing in the lab, each with a pipette in hand and a microtiter plate in front of them; Copyright: Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Deep Visual Proteomics: tracking down cancer

08.09.2022

Proteins are frequently called the building blocks of life because they are found everywhere, including in our cells. This makes them an important factor when it comes to diseases. As a result, mapping the protein landscape can be a crucial ally in the fight against diseases. Now, a German-Danish team has developed a method that provides researchers with unprecedented insights into cancer.
Read more
Image: Doctor and medical assistant at the bedside of a patient who has breathing problems and is wearing an oxygen mask; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Why some people get a more severe COVID-19 progression than others

22.08.2022

A team of scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) together with colleagues from the United Kingdom and Canada have found genes and proteins that contribute to a higher risk of severe COVID-19.
Read more
Image: Person in the laboratory holding cell samples under a microscope; Copyright: MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

Molecular markers: predicting the most effective treatment for IBD

09.08.2022

Early effective treatment can help manage this condition and improve the quality of life of patients. A research project aims to identify molecular markers to better assess the chances of success of certain biological therapies and subsequently determine the best individualized treatment plan.
Read more
Image: Two male researchers analyzing data sets on a computer screen; Copyright: Felix Petermann | MDC

Felix Petermann | MDC

Project "ikarus" provides new insights for cancer research

01.08.2022

Artificial intelligence (AI) is about to become a game changer, especially in diagnostics. However, there are still limits to the use of AI. Dr. Altuna Akalin had to recognize this as well. The head of the Max Delbrück Center's (MDC) technology platform for "Bioinformatics and Omics Data Science" developed "ikarus" with his team.
Read more
Image: Chip with adipose tissue is held in place by hands in purple disposable gloves; Copyright: Berthold Steinhilber

Berthold Steinhilber

Ex vivo obesity research thanks to the adipose-on-chip system

08.07.2022

Ex vivo studies of human obesity without animal testing? The Adipose-on-Chip system offers a solution that allows scientists to gain better insights into various obesity-linked secondary diseases and comorbidities in the future.
Read more
Image: Professor Dr Peter Hillemanns and PD Dr Matthias Jentschke with the HPV self-tests; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Prevention of cervical cancer with HPV self-testing

28.10.2021

Cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases of the female reproductive organs. Human papilloma viruses are almost always responsible for cervical cancer and the corresponding precancerous lesions. As part of the statutory preventive medical check-up, women from the age of 20 can have a cell smear taken from the cervix once a year, the so-called Pap test, to detect cell changes.
Read more
Image: A man with a smartwatch on his wrist; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia Ltd

Controlling insulin production with a smartwatch

15.06.2021

Many modern fitness trackers and smartwatches feature integrated LEDs. The green light emitted, whether continuous or pulsed, penetrates the skin and can be used to measure the wearer's heart rate during physical activity or while at rest.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Tissue Engineering and Bioprinting – From artificial heart valves and printed humans

27.01.2021

Drug research and artificial skin replacement - these are the areas in which tissue engineering and bioprinting are already used today. What else could be possible in the future? We asked Dr. Nadine Nottrodt from Fraunhofer ILT and Prof. Sabine Neuß-Stein from RWTH Aachen University Hospital!
Read more
Image: wound-healing gel; Copyright: RUDN University

RUDN University

Wound-healing gel with metabolic products of trichoderma

07.12.2020

Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry of RUDN University developed a wound-healing gel based on a substance that is produced by Trichoderma fungi. The results of the study were published in the Nov.-Dec. 2020 issue Systematic Reviews in Pharmacy journal.
Read more
Image: Illustrations of various 3D-printed prostheses, implants and organs; Copyright: PantherMedia/annyart

Printed life – possibilities and limits of bioprinting

01.12.2020

Implants, prostheses and various other components made of plastic, metal or ceramics are already being produced by additive manufacturing. But skin, blood vessels or entire organs from the printer – is that possible? For years now, intensive research has been underway into the production of biologically functional tissue using printing processes. Some things are already possible with bioprinting.
Read more
Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01.12.2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
Read more
Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01.12.2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01.12.2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Smartlab – Robotics and automation in the laboratory

15.09.2020

Some tasks in the laboratory are repetitive, need to be done extremely precise and require a lot of time. Such tasks are very tedious for humans, but they are tailor-made for robots. Such is the case with the "AutoCRAT" project at the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT in Aachen. Here, a robotic platform is developed to produce stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Medical products made of collagen - Biocompatible, elastic, stable

19.03.2020

Regenerative medicine often relies on implants and materials that support healing in our body. Collagen has a special significance here. It is compatible to the body and offers an excellent environment for the growing of new cells. In our video, we took a look on where collagen and collagen products for medicine come from.
Read more
Image: Computer-generated image of an arborizing blood vessel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ugreen

Angiogenesis: light shows blood vessels the way

03.02.2020

Regenerative medicine aims to replace damage in the body with functional tissue and restore normal function. The first defense for large defects are implants made of hydrogels, designed to promote cell growth. They need their own blood supply, which is a problem when it comes to larger implants because you cannot regulate where and how the blood vessels grow - until now.
Read more
Image: The shoulder of a man with a surgical suture; Copyright: panthermedia.net/JPCPROD

Regenerative medicine: helps the body healing

03.02.2020

Severe wounds heal slowly and leave scars. This is why we have been using regenerative therapies for some time now to accelerate and improve healing. They also help to avoid permanent damage. Still, complex applications like replacing organs or limbs will rather remain vision than become reality for a long time.
Read more
Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
Read more
Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
Read more
Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
Read more
Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
Read more