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Image: The graphic visualizes the 3D bio-printing method. It shows two needles injecting hydrogels and fibers; Copyright: Universität Bayreuth

Universität Bayreuth

Advanced 3D printing technology improves tissue engineering

19/02/2024

Advancements in 3D printing technology are improving tissue engineering, offering promising prospects for the artificial production of biological tissues. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have developed a changing technique that combines hydrogels and fibers, opening new avenues for tissue fabrication.
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Image: A stained micrograph of 3D primary human liver cell tissue modeling MASH. Areas of fibrosis are indicated in blue; Copyright: Viscient Biosciences

Viscient Biosciences

Revolutionizing liver disease research with 3D bioprinted model

07/02/2024

Metabolic dysfunction-associated steatohepatitis (MASH), previously known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is a liver disease characterized by inflammation and scarring, reaching epidemic proportions with an estimated 1.5 percent to 6.5 percent of U.S. adults affected.
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Image: Close up: orthopaedic implant made from titanium-tantalum; Copyright: NTU Singapore

NTU Singapore

Singapore: advancing 3D printing in healthcare with joint R&D lab

11/12/2023

Singapore General Hospital (SGH) patients are expected to benefit from healthcare innovations, such as customised medical devices and implants, under a collaboration with Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) to set up a Joint Research & Development Laboratory in additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing.
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Image: Close-up shot of hearing researcher Yanjing Luo wearing a mask and gown. She holds the ear canal implant in her hand; Copyright: Desktop Health

Desktop Health

MHH produces world’s first patient-specific implants with drug release

22/11/2023

For the first time, the ENT clinic at Hannover Medical School (MHH) has provided an adult patient with a customized implant for the external auditory canal featuring drug release benefits.
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A man with a beard is interviewed, in the background several 3D printed products; copyright: beta-web | Messe Düsseldorf

3D printing on the assembly line – iFactory 3D GmbH

16/11/2023

3D printing enables the individual production of single pieces and small series at low cost. However, it also has a disadvantage: printing takes a relatively long time and it is not possible to produce several pieces in succession with a single printer. At the MEDICA START-UP PARK at MEDICA 2023, we met a company that automates 3D printing. Find out how in the interview with iFactory 3D GmbH.
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Image: Close-up of a human gray blue eye; Copyright: David Callahan

David Callahan

Eye implant may be used to treat diabetes

27/10/2023

Researchers in Sweden have developed a microscale device for implantation in the eye, which presents new opportunities for cell-based treatment of diabetes and other diseases.
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Image: Prosthesis: 3D-printed plastics polylactic acid and thermoplastic polyurethane. Each finger contains four parts held together by plastic pins; Copyright: University of Houston

University of Houston

3D printable prostheses to restore amputees' finger mobility

18/10/2023

A groundbreaking, easy-to-use 3D printable finger prosthesis created by a recent University of Houston graduate could offer amputees a low-cost solution to restore finger functionality.
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Image: A blue 3d printed wrist splint on a hand; Copyright: Courtesy of Faraz Faruqi and Stefanie Mueller

Courtesy of Faraz Faruqi and Stefanie Mueller

AI-driven tool to personalize 3D-printable models

20/09/2023

MIT researchers developed a generative-AI-driven tool that enables the user to add custom design elements to 3D models without compromising the functionality of the fabricated objects. A designer could utilize this tool, called Style2Fab, to personalize 3D models of objects using only natural language prompts to describe their desired design.
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Image: A man with dark hair and a white shirt inspects a 3D printer; Copyright: Patrick Mansell/Penn State

Patrick Mansell/Penn State

High-speed bioprinting of bones, tracheas, organs

28/07/2023

Developing technology to quickly and efficiently bioprint human tissues at scale is the goal of a new project led by Penn State researchers. When fully developed, the technology will be the first to enable the fabrication of scalable, native tissues such as bones, tracheas and organs.
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Image: Physiotherapy in the upper back with TENS electrode pads, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Electrodes: 4D printing for nerve stimulation

25/07/2023

Specific nerves may be stimulated artificially, for example to treat pain. The finer the nerves, the more difficult it is to attach the required electrodes. Researchers have now developed flexible electrodes produced with 4D printing technology. On contact with moisture, they automatically fold and wrap themselves around thin nerves.
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Image: Image showing the preparation of hydrogels that enhance the viability of NK cells; Copyright: KIMM

KIMM

3D bioprinting technology to be used for removing cancer cells

14/07/2023

KIMM develops the world’s first 3D bioprinting technology that enhances the function of NK immune cells. The new technology is expected to improve effectiveness of cancer treatment.
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Image: knee joint highlighted in red on which the person has placed their hands; copyright: mihacreative

mihacreative

Personalized cartilage replacement helps with knee pain

27/06/2023

Knee osteoarthritis is a widespread form of arthrosis that limits those affected in their everyday lives. The wear and tear in the cartilage tissue often causes pain and movement restrictions. In order to improve treatment, researchers have developed a process that allows artificial cartilage tissue to be individually tailored to sufferers.
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Image: Micrograph of bacterial biofilms; Copyright: Buntan2019

Buntan2019

Biofilms: Infection model from the 3D printer

21/06/2023

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) have developed a novel method to place biofilms on lung cells in the laboratory. The model system produced by means of "bioprinting" should help to better understand infection processes and assist in the development of new active substances.
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Image: Close-up: A 3D printed amber pill; Copyright: MPI-INF

MPI-INF

3D-printed pills with desired drug release

29/05/2023

A group of Computer Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Informatics in Saarbrücken, Germany, and the University of California at Davis, have invented a process that relies solely on the shape of the object for a time-controlled release.
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Image: The carrier of the ARM2U team, Kyle Briggs, competing with the prosthesis at a Cybathlon 2023 event; Copyright: BarcelonaTech (UPC)

BarcelonaTech (UPC)

Low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses

25/05/2023

A low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses: The ARM2u biomedical engineering team, from the UPC’s Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB), is working on new functions for their low-cost 3D-printed transradial prosthesis.
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Image: Close-up of a WFIRM gyroid-shaped construct on a blue-gloved hand; Copyright: WFIRM

WFIRM

Bioprinting research makes history when it soars to the ISS

17/05/2023

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) will make history this month when the first bioprinted solid tissue constructs soar to the International Space Station (ISS) on board the next all private astronaut mission by commercial space leader Axiom Space.
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Image: An insole is made on a 3D printer; Copyright: Marco Binelli / ETH Zürich

Marco Binelli / ETH Zürich

3D-printed insoles measure sole pressure directly in the shoe

24/03/2023

Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and EPFL are developing a 3D-printed insole with integrated sensors that allows the pressure of the sole to be measured in the shoe and thus during any activity.
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Image: The use of sound waves to create a pressure field to print particles; Copyright: Kai Melde, MPI für medizinische Forschung

Kai Melde, MPI für medizinische Forschung

Creating 3D objects with sound

17/02/2023

Scientists from the Micro, Nano and Molecular Systems Lab at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research and the Institute for Molecular Systems Engineering and Advanced Materials at Heidelberg University have created a new technology to assemble matter in 3D.
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Image: Chung-Hao Lee, Ph.D., at the University of Oklahoma, smiles at the camera in a business suit; Copyright: University of Oklahoma

University of Oklahoma

Researchers designing device to improve brain aneurysm treatment

03/02/2023

Under the direction of Chung-Hao Lee, Ph.D., at the University of Oklahoma, a five-year research project will lead to the design of a device that can be customized to better treat unique aneurysms, the irregular bulge in a blood vessel that can be deadly.
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Image: A man with brown hair in a white coat, Ángel Serrano Aroca, smiles at the camera; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Asociación RUVID

Biomaterial capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections

15/12/2022

Researchers from the Bioengineering and Biomaterials Laboratory of Universidad Católica de Valencia (UCV) have developed a new porous material capable of regenerating bones and preventing infections at the same time.
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Image: Nurse is caring for a surgical wound at the leg of a patient; Copyright: DegrooteStock

DegrooteStock

Wound care: healing with technology

01/12/2022

Wound care by nurses is directly about cleaning, sterile covering, and documentation. Medical and surgical interventions may also be necessary. In this context, wound care also offers potential for the use of technical aids that can help prevent complications.
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Image: Nurse is cleaning a surgical wound with two sutures between the fingers of a patient; Copyright: ARTFULLY79

ARTFULLY79

Technology in wound care: tools for better healing

01/12/2022

Wounds – both acute and chronic ones – can have many different causes. They all have in common that they require meticulous care because complications in wound healing can severely reduce both the patients’ health and quality of life. But there is more to modern wound care than just cleaning and bandaging them. Nursing staff and physicians can also access technical aids for this work.
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Image: A medical professional places their hands on a table and holds a stethoscope. One of their hands is a myoelectric prosthesis; Copyright: LightFieldStudios

LightFieldStudios

Smart surgery, endoscopy, robotics: rethought and optimized for the times

04/10/2022

Overall technical progress does not stop at the operating rooms of this world. Whether it's completely new ideas or robotic optimizations of classic methods – research teams are coming up with contemporary answers to long-standing questions using the diverse possibilities of the present day.
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Image: A flexible endoscope being prepared for a treatment; Copyright: GabiStock

GabiStock

Body follows head: Bridging the gap between rigid and flexible endoscopes

04/10/2022

A successful endoscopic intervention hinges on two key factors: the endoscope must have excellent maneuverability and high structural rigidity. Unfortunately, today's devices cannot meet both requirements at the same time. Tim-Lukas Habich wants to change that by bridging the gap between flexible and rigid robots.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Fibers for fibers – Textile implants repair the body

08/06/2022

We are nowadays already able to weave implants out of artificial fibers that can replace tissue or heal injuries. Different materials like polymers or nitinol are used to create flexible shapes. But the materials and their uses can still be improved.
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Image: Three different smartphone screens showing different analysis graphics of the app; Copyright: Fabienne Erben

Fabienne Erben

App supports pediatric movement therapy

01/06/2022

Gamification is becoming ever more popular in rehabilitation. Yet it’s not easy to design games that increase motivation and engagement. Fabienne Erben is a student at the Munich University of Applied Sciences who accepted the challenge and homed in on a difficult target group: children.
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Sonography training – Inexpensive models from the 3D printer

23/05/2022

Many medical disciplines rely on the tenet "Practice makes perfect". Sonography diagnostics is one of them. Unfortunately, constant training can be difficult, as patients with specific diseases are not present at a hospital all the time. The University Hospital Bonn is creating a solution for this problem: 3D printed models of joints and arteries are used in training.
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Image: 3D printed finger orthosis from 3Digity; Copyright: 3Digity

3Digity

Finger orthosis: Custom fit with 3D printing

10/05/2022

Following an injury or surgery, orthotics are key components of the recovery and rehabilitation process. The University spin-off 3Digity designs 3D-printed customized finger orthoses to foster rehabilitation as custom orthotics can drastically speed up the recovery process.
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Image: a smiling man stands in front of a white 3D printer; Copyright: Gabriel Salg/Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg

Gabriel Salg/Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg

Using 3D printing to create insulin-producing cells

22/02/2022

3D printing opens a world of endless possibilities – for both industrial and medical applications. A cross-national project recently created tissue that produces insulin, spelling hope for patients with diabetes.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Digitalization in orthopedic technology – A craft is changing

22/11/2021

Orthopedic auxiliary means are mostly still produced in manual labor today. But orthopedic technology is also trying out new ways by using tools like 3D scanners, digital models and 3D printing. Nadja Singer from Ottobock explains in our video interview how this changes the production of auxiliary means.
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Image: The foot of a patient is being scanned; Copyright: PantherMedia/Rainer Plendl

Getting from 3D scan to 3D print: computer-aided prostheses and orthoses

01/07/2021

Orthopedic technology is a true craft: That's because prostheses and orthoses are rarely off-the-shelf products. Orthopedic technicians must typically use different materials to custom create and fit the devices. Many of these processes are manual. For several years now, 3D scanning and 3D printing have modernized the industry thanks to digital design freedom and flexible production.
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Image: A young boy is sitting in front of a computer, looking at a 3D scan of his head; Copyright: Artec 3D

Orthopedic technology: 3D scanners change the industry

01/07/2021

Orthopedic technology involves taking a measurement of a specific body part and then creating a medical device, be it prosthesis or orthosis, that fits. While optical scanners are already used for some of these measurements, others are still performed through manual labor and craft to create molds of the body. 3D scanners are changing this.
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Image: a 3D-printed orthosis designed by Luxinergy and kerkoc; Copyright: Luxinery/kerkoc

Luxinergy/kerkoc

Customized and freshly printed: 3D printing in orthopedics

01/07/2021

Creating custom-made medical devices to target individual patient needs: that is the core function and primary objective of orthopedics. Using 3D printers for this will make sense in the future. Luxinergy is an innovative Austrian technology company that specializes in the development of biocompatible resins and large-format 3D printers.
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Image: Sheath of a leg prosthesis that gets printed by a 3D printer; Copyright: PantherMedia/Markov81

Digital orthopedic technology: scan, customize, print

01/07/2021

When auxiliary means like orthoses or prostheses do not come from the shelf, but are adapted to the wearer, this means true crafting: In the past, a plaster mold of a body part had to be made as a template to create an individual aid from it step by step. Fortunately, we have come a long way until today.
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Tissue Engineering and Bioprinting – From artificial heart valves and printed humans

27/01/2021

Drug research and artificial skin replacement - these are the areas in which tissue engineering and bioprinting are already used today. What else could be possible in the future? We asked Dr. Nadine Nottrodt from Fraunhofer ILT and Prof. Sabine Neuß-Stein from RWTH Aachen University Hospital!
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Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01/12/2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01/12/2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
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Image: Illustrations of various 3D-printed prostheses, implants and organs; Copyright: PantherMedia/annyart

Printed life – possibilities and limits of bioprinting

01/12/2020

Implants, prostheses and various other components made of plastic, metal or ceramics are already being produced by additive manufacturing. But skin, blood vessels or entire organs from the printer – is that possible? For years now, intensive research has been underway into the production of biologically functional tissue using printing processes. Some things are already possible with bioprinting.
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Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01/12/2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
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Image: The shoulder of a man with a surgical suture; Copyright: panthermedia.net/JPCPROD

Regenerative medicine: helps the body healing

03/02/2020

Severe wounds heal slowly and leave scars. This is why we have been using regenerative therapies for some time now to accelerate and improve healing. They also help to avoid permanent damage. Still, complex applications like replacing organs or limbs will rather remain vision than become reality for a long time.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03/02/2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: Two knees of a woman next to each other, the left knee has a surgical suture; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wujekspeed

Regenerative medicine: creating a new body?

03/02/2020

Regenerative medicine aims to repair the human body after injuries, accidents or major cancer surgery. Unfortunately, we are still not at a stage where this process can achieve optimal results for every conceivable situation. Having said that, various new methods are on the cusp of breakthrough.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01/01/2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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