More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

Image: Newborn baby lies on his stomach in an incubator; Copyright: mvaligursky

mvaligursky

Incubators: method to reduce alcohol absorbed from disinfectants used

22.03.2023

Researchers from the University of Tsukuba showed the association between the concentration of evaporated alcohol from alcohol-based disinfectants used for incubators and the amount of alcohol absorbed by premature infants.
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Image: Close-up of a scientist wearing protective clothing looking through a microscope; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Smart microscopy works out where to take the picture

16.03.2023

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a software solution for smart, data-driven microscopy, which makes this possible.
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Image: Detailed measurement of how the motor protein kinesin-1 (red) walks on microtubules (white); Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Further advance in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

16.03.2023

Scientists led by Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have developed a super-resolution microscope with a spatio-temporal precision of one nanometer per millisecond.
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Image: Black cones show water molecules being oriented in the electric field at the interface with the lipid; Copyright: Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Carlos Marques / ENS Lyon

Standard model of electroporation refuted

15.03.2023

Technology developed at the University of Freiburg enables experimental test. The new findings could help to improve the transport of active substances into cells
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Image: A baby with a congenital diaphragmatic hernia is ventilated in an incubator; Copyright: Colourbox

Colourbox

Stem cell model: research into malformation of the newborn lung

15.03.2023

Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is one of the deadliest birth defects. To better understand and treat this condition in the future, an international team of researchers involving Leipzig University Hospital designed a new cell model in the laboratory and tested a drug therapy on it.
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Image: Medical research Close-up of a microplate; Copyright: manjurulhaque

manjurulhaque

RIANA: Viennese start-up develops novel, precise anti-cancer drugs

14.03.2023

The technological basis is a proprietary platform technology for the discovery of drugs that target cancer-causing protein-protein interactions (PPIs).
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Image: A small dark box, a mobile impedance spectrometer; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer ISC

Innovative in vitro eye irritation test to replace standard animal testing

10.03.2023

Researchers at the Translational Center for Regenerative Therapies TLC-RT of the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC want to work with partners to replace animal testing.
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Image: A man in fine striped shirt with glasses, Prof. Dr. med. Tobias Moser, smiles at the camera; Copyright: MBExC/spförtner

MBExC/spförtner

Optical cochlea implant: ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Tobias Moser

02.03.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: The photo shows the scanning of a blood sample in a laboratory at CiiM.; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

What leads to severe COVID-19 diseases?

01.03.2023

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 leads to severe disease in some people, while others do not get ill or only experience mild disease. But why is this the case? Unfortunately, we do not know exactly. We do know that an overactive innate immune system is causing severe COVID-19 disease, but it is unclear how this is regulated.
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Image: old man falls to the ground and touches his forehead; Copyright: LightFieldStudios

LightFieldStudios

Balance ability predicts cognitive impairment

28.02.2023

In a study recently published in BMC Geriatrics, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed a new measure of physical balance that could help to identify individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD).
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Image: Two men in dark clothes posing in front of the experimental station Alvra of the Swiss X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL; Copyright: Paul Scherrer Institut/Markus Fischer

Paul Scherrer Institut/Markus Fischer

Using light to switch drugs on and off

27.02.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: Man is grabbing his throat with one hand, touches the larynx; Copyright: towfiqu98

towfiqu98

Vocal cord paresis: surgical treatment to reverse paralysis

27.02.2023

The paralysis of the vocal folds, the vocal fold paresis (also known as vocal cord paralysis) is a condition in which most patients cannot control the movement of the muscles that control the voice. This can make it hard to speak, prompting a reduction in speech volume that makes it challenging to understand the person. Some patients may even have difficulty breathing.
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Image: Researchers at HIPS work with zebrafish larvae to detect potential side effects of new drugs at an early stage; Copyright: Dietze / HIPS

Dietze / HIPS

HIPS and CISPA join forces to make future active ingredients safer

23.02.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
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Image: Immune cell trafficking in diabetic cataract formation.; Copyright: HAWK

HAWK

Imaging: role of immune cells in early diabetic cataract development

22.02.2023

The team of researchers, led by Prof. Dr. Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Director of the Molecular Biomarkers Nano-Imaging Laboratory (MBNI), in collaboration with Professor Dr. Christoph Rußmann, Dean of the Health Campus and a Visiting Professor at MBNI, found early signs of damage in the eye before the onset of type 2 diabetes.
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Image: Model of AR glasses that can be worn for fall prevention; Copyright:

Lorenz Assländer

Fall prevention with AR glasses

21.02.2023

Older people have a much higher risk of falls and serious injury arising from a fall. Researchers involved in the “Augmented Balance" project aim to develop augmented reality (AR) glasses to help improve balance and prevent falls.
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Image: The project team, consisting of 15 people, poses in front of a gray wall; Copyright: The Project Team / Claudia Pock

The Project Team / Claudia Pock

Multinational research consortium to advance nanomedicine manufacturing

15.02.2023

Gattefossé, InProcess-LSP, Knauer, Microfluidics, Skyepharma, and the University of Graz join the RCPE-led European Consortium for Continuous Pharmaceutical Manufacturing (ECCPM) to jointly develop a modular, flexible toolkit to advance industrial-scale production of lipid nanoparticles.
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Image: A man in a white coat and with safety goggles, Hongji Yan, holds a test tube in his hand and is looking at the camera; Copyright: Vaibhav Srivastava

Vaibhav Srivastava

Mucus-based gel improves bone graft results, promotes healing

14.02.2023

Molecules from mucus can be used to produce synthetic bone graft material and help with the healing of larger bone loss, a new study found.
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Image: A white electrospun Renacer membrane (5 x 5 cm) on a black background; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISC

Fraunhofer ISC

Bioresorbable membrane for healing internal and external wounds

10.02.2023

Fraunhofer researchers have succeeded in using the bioresorbable silica gel Renacer to produce an electrospun membrane that is neither cytotoxic to cells nor genotoxic.
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Image: A woman with black hair in a white coat sits in a research laboratory and operates a microscope; Copyright: wichayada69

wichayada69

Funding to produce biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials

08.02.2023

A new junior research group at Freie Universität Berlin, which will investigate the production of biodegradable antiviral and antibacterial materials, with one of the goals of synthesis being new alternatives to conventional antibiotics, will receive a total budget of more than 1.8 million euros from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) over the next five years.
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Image: Chung-Hao Lee, Ph.D., at the University of Oklahoma, smiles at the camera in a business suit; Copyright: University of Oklahoma

University of Oklahoma

Researchers designing device to improve brain aneurysm treatment

03.02.2023

Under the direction of Chung-Hao Lee, Ph.D., at the University of Oklahoma, a five-year research project will lead to the design of a device that can be customized to better treat unique aneurysms, the irregular bulge in a blood vessel that can be deadly.
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Image: Patient testing a brain-computer interface developed by Charité to control an exoskeleton hand; Copyright: AG Klinische Neurotechnologie, Charité Berlin

AG Klinische Neurotechnologie, Charité Berlin

Controlling neural exoskeletons more precisely with diamond sensors

02.02.2023

In the recently launched NeuroQ lighthouse project, the project partners develop highly sensitive diamond-based quantum sensors that will enable paralyzed people to control neural exoskeletons more precisely.
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Image: During their journey through the blood, blood proteins accumulate on the surface of nanoparticles. 3D illustration; Copyright: MPI-P

MPI-P

New insights into the utilization of nanotechnology-based drugs

01.02.2023

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now followed the path of such a particle into a cell using a combination of several microscopy methods. They were able to observe a cell-internal process that effectively separates blood components and nanoparticles.
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Image: Kid in wheelchair is happy with father on the beach, Excited to see the sea on a vacation; Copyright: gaysorn1442

gaysorn1442

Wearable tech, AI, clinical teams combine to change face of clinical trial monitoring

30.01.2023

A multi-disciplinary team of researchers has developed a way to monitor the progression of movement disorders using motion capture technology and AI.
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Image: A physiotherapist is doing a leg exercise with a woman who is wearing an orthosis; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Muscles and nervous system: Space research helps combat degeneration

30.01.2023

Injuries do not just happen to athletes: along with surgeries, they are often the reason for prolonged bed rest. Meanwhile, extended physical inactivity can trigger changes in muscles and the nervous system. Sports medicine wants to counteract these negative effects and use insights from space research in the future.
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Bild: DNA strand assembly from different elements. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

The architecture of shattered genomes

27.01.2023

Hunting for disease clues in the dark matter of our DNA. Scientists have reconstructed the chromosomes of patients with an extremely high number of aberrations in their genome that could alter the expression of nearby genes and potentially cause disease. Their results were published in Nature Communications in October 2022.
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Bild: Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. 3D illustration; Copyright: iLexx

iLexx

Bacterial electricity: Membrane potential influences antibiotic tolerance

27.01.2023

The electrical potential across the bacterial cell envelope indicates when bacteria no longer operate as individual cells but as a collective. Researchers at the University of Cologne's Institute for Biological Physics have discovered this connection between the electrical properties and the lifestyle of bacteria.
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Image: An elderly man sits at an eye diagnostic device and is examined by a doctor; Copyright: Beachbumledford

Beachbumledford

Controlled manufacture, storage and freezing of artificial retinal cells

25.01.2023

Fraunhofer researchers have now developed a new method for the production and clinical application of stem-cell-based retinal implants, which could contribute towards the successful treatment of AMD.
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Image: Close-up Of A Man Checking Blood Sugar Level At Home With Glucometer And Test Strips; Copyright: dolgachov

dolgachov

Type 2 diabetes: Machine learning can predict poor glycemic control from patient information systems

13.01.2023

The risk for poor glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes can be predicted with confidence by using machine learning methods, a new study from Finland finds.
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Image: Position of molecules on nanoparticle surfaces as a 3D illustration; Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

How optical microscopes allow detailed investigations of nanoparticles

06.01.2023

In their project "Supercol"- funded by the European Union - scientists want to achieve the investigation of nanoparticles with light.
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Image: Small moldecules - illustration in orange; Copyright: Aalto University

Aalto University

Gaining unprecedented view of small molecules by machine learning

06.01.2023

A new tool to identify small molecules offers benefits for diagnostics, drug discovery and fundamental research. A new machine learning model will help scientists identify small molecules, with applications in medicine, drug discovery and environmental chemistry.
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Image: Physical therapist putting electrostimulation belt on a patient; Copyright: 9_fingers_

9_fingers_

Electrical current to fight COVID-19: The intelligent electric pill

28.11.2022

In 2020, Prof. Eugenijus Kaniusas and his research partners hypothesized that stimulating the auricular vagus nerve has anti-inflammatory effects in severe COVID-19 cases. In 2022, they were able to confirm this hypothesis thanks to a clinical trial.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Together for the newest technology – Highlight tour at the Fraunhofer joint stand

15.11.2022

Several Fraunhofer institutes present their latest technology in the field of medical technology and health at MEDICA 2022. Automation processes, polymers and digital networking are just some of the topics to be found at the stand. We talked to some of the institutes during our highlight tour.
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Image: Woman with sensors on the upper body on a runner; Copyright: pixelaway

pixelaway

Movement analysis with electromagnetic wave-based sensor technology

03.11.2022

Wearable technologies are widely used in today’s sports medicine. Whether they home in on a diagnosis or track people’s various parameters, wearables, and smart textiles are here to provide information and support. The MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE will showcase some of the latest trends and research developments pertaining to sports medicine.
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Image: small empty test tubes with lids in different colors; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

Messe Düsseldorf/C. Tillmann

RNA technologies make targeted immune activation possible

03.11.2022

MEDICA 2022 is right around the corner, ready to deliver insights into the advancements and innovations in laboratory medicine. One of the key topics of the MEDICA LABMED Forum is RNA technologies and the wide range of applications that involve cell biology. RNA technologies not only enable Covid-19 vaccines but promise an array of treatment options for genetic diseases, in and beyond oncology.
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Image: Entrance area of Messe Düsseldorf,

Messe Düsseldorf / ctillmann

MEDICA 2022: Where Healthcare is going

03.11.2022

The time has come: MEDICA 2022 opens its doors! Whether start-ups, current research results from sports medicine or exciting contributions from the laboratories of this world - you will find all of this bundled at the trade fair center in Düsseldorf from November 14 to 17. For a brief overview of what visitors can expect in our forums and conferences, see our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Sleeping female patient in hospital bed with oxygen ventilator; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Breathe again: Diaphragm stimulation after prolonged mechanical ventilation

24.10.2022

For the past two years, the Greifswald University Medical Center has been collaborating in an international study in which a therapy using electrostimulation of the diaphragm is designed to wean patients off artificial respiration. The innovative system aims to achieve faster independence from the ventilator.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Digital patient model for chronic diseases – A dashboard for more targeted diagnoses and therapies

05.10.2022

In the MED²ICIN lead project, a digital patient model for chronically ill persons has been developed. A particularly clear, web-based dashboard shows, among other things, the course of the disease, medication responses and recommendations for action. In addition, the data can be compared with a large pool of data from other patients.
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Image: A medical professional places their hands on a table and holds a stethoscope. One of their hands is a myoelectric prosthesis; Copyright: LightFieldStudios

LightFieldStudios

Smart surgery, endoscopy, robotics: rethought and optimized for the times

04.10.2022

Overall technical progress does not stop at the operating rooms of this world. Whether it's completely new ideas or robotic optimizations of classic methods – research teams are coming up with contemporary answers to long-standing questions using the diverse possibilities of the present day.
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Image: The arms of an endoscope; Copyright: Madeleine Waltner

Madeleine Waltner

Actuators, sensors, controllers: The robot-assisted flexible endoscope combines all three

04.10.2022

The rise of robotics in medicine will result in more applications in this sector in the future. This necessitates the design of robotic systems that meet the requirements for the respective medical implementation. Scientists at the Institute of Medical Device Technology at the University of Stuttgart are developing the systems, components, sensors, and control technology to meet this demand.
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Image: A flexible endoscope being prepared for a treatment; Copyright: GabiStock

GabiStock

Body follows head: Bridging the gap between rigid and flexible endoscopes

04.10.2022

A successful endoscopic intervention hinges on two key factors: the endoscope must have excellent maneuverability and high structural rigidity. Unfortunately, today's devices cannot meet both requirements at the same time. Tim-Lukas Habich wants to change that by bridging the gap between flexible and rigid robots.
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Image: 3D rendering of an operating room with C-arm and robotic-assisted surgery system; Copyright: tridsanu

tridsanu

Accessing the surgical area: Digitization is coming to the OR

01.10.2022

Innovative medical technology is driving the digitization of healthcare institutions and is opening a world of possibilities. This is especially the case for minimally invasive robotic-assisted surgery.
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Image: Scientist works with medical test tube to analyze green liquid; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Diagnosing breast cancer through liquid biopsy

22.09.2022

Breast cancer diagnosis usually includes invasive testing with tissue biopsies. The samples have to be extracted from the cancerous tissue or cells. To make the process easier on the patients, the project LIBIMEDOTS is currently developing a different approach with liquid biopsy technology.
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Image: Thierry Nordmann (left) & Lisa Schweizer are standing in the lab, each with a pipette in hand and a microtiter plate in front of them; Copyright: Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Deep Visual Proteomics: tracking down cancer

08.09.2022

Proteins are frequently called the building blocks of life because they are found everywhere, including in our cells. This makes them an important factor when it comes to diseases. As a result, mapping the protein landscape can be a crucial ally in the fight against diseases. Now, a German-Danish team has developed a method that provides researchers with unprecedented insights into cancer.
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Image: scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells in the blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized treatment of acute stroke: diagnostics with 3D virtual histology

23.08.2022

Every minute counts when someone is having an acute stroke. If the cause is a vascular blockage caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the brain, detailed insights into the thrombus composition is critical to remove or dissolve it successfully and help restore blood flow. But that’s often easier said than done when "time is brain".
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Image: A woman with long blonde hair and black glasses smiles at the camera - Anna Rising, research group leader; Copyright: Lena Holm

Lena Holm

Scientists develop gel made from spider silk proteins for biomedical applications

19.08.2022

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have discovered that spider silk proteins can be fused to biologically active proteins and be converted into a gel at body temperature.
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Image: Person in the laboratory holding cell samples under a microscope; Copyright: MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

MICROGEN@GMAIL.COM

Molecular markers: predicting the most effective treatment for IBD

09.08.2022

Early effective treatment can help manage this condition and improve the quality of life of patients. A research project aims to identify molecular markers to better assess the chances of success of certain biological therapies and subsequently determine the best individualized treatment plan.
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Image: Two drops of water on a screen that shows a pattern of colored bars; Copyright: ktsimage

ktsimage

Big Data in genetics: reaching diagnosis through heaps of data

01.08.2022

Most laboratory tests only produce small amounts of data that are already sufficient for successful diagnosis. It becomes more difficult with genetic questions: whether it is about a genetic disease or the properties of tumors, there are large amounts of data that must be considered. Both research and medicine need help to identify the connections and patterns in the data to find a diagnosis.
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Image: Two men are sitting in front of a laptop computer and are talking about an image on the screen - Josch Konstantin Pauling, Nikolai Köhler; Copytight: LipiTUM

LipiTUM

MoSBi: Algorithm identifies disease subtypes

01.08.2022

Doctors have always used symptoms, imaging, and laboratory data to define and diagnose diseases, but at times it is simply not enough: while patients may have the same illness, it may exhibit different changes at the molecular level. A team from the Technical University of Munich has developed the so-called MoSBi algorithm and makes it available to researchers to identify molecular differences.
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Image: surgical team of three people around a cardiac surgeon in an operating room looking at an echocardiogram on a screen; Copyright: westend 61

westend61

Is it a heart attack or something else? How artificial intelligence can support diagnostics

22.07.2022

Chest pain, shortness of breath, a brief loss of consciousness – warning signs that suggest a heart attack. But it might also be Takotsubo syndrome, also known as stress cardiomyopathy or broken heart syndrome with symptoms that resemble a heart attack. Yet it is of utmost importance to differentiate between the two conditions to initiate the right treatment.
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Image: Chip with adipose tissue is held in place by hands in purple disposable gloves; Copyright: Berthold Steinhilber

Berthold Steinhilber

Ex vivo obesity research thanks to the adipose-on-chip system

08.07.2022

Ex vivo studies of human obesity without animal testing? The Adipose-on-Chip system offers a solution that allows scientists to gain better insights into various obesity-linked secondary diseases and comorbidities in the future.
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Image: Two female researchers examine the odor of a sample in a laboratory setting; Copyright: microgen@gmail.com

microgen@gmail.com

Digital nose facilitates early detection and diagnosis

22.06.2022

Many diseases can be treated successfully if they are diagnosed early. Research into a “digital (electronic) nose” is one promising development to facilitate early detection and diagnosis. That’s because body odors and their molecular composition are an early indicator of various diseases that often remain undetected in the early stages.
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Image: Man with mask is doing sports; Copyright: PantherMedia / Marushy99

PantherMedia / Marushy99

FFP2, N95, and KN95 masks: Does wearing them affect endurance and athletic performance?

08.04.2022

Does wearing a mask diminish athletic performance? Do we fatigue faster while wearing a face mask during exercise? Our subjective perception might suggest that a mask or face covering restricts us. A study by the University of Wuppertal explored the physiological effects of wearing KN95 or FFP2 (European Union standard) face masks.
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Image: Patient having a throat examination performed by the remote-controlled robot; Copyright: TU Munich

TUM

Telediagnostic solutions: expert exams with no physical contact

01.04.2022

Applications of telemedicine surged in popularity in efforts to reduce the COVID-19 infection risk for both medical professionals and patients. Unfortunately, the services typically lack a proper diagnostic option.
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Image: Man with a VR headset on his head is exercising with a rubber tape; Copyright: videoreality GmbH

videoreality GmbH

Chronic pain: Virtual Reality helps alter pain perception

22.03.2022

The cause of chronic back pain can be hard to find. Pain sufferers are typically advised to embark on regular exercise, combined with physical therapy and pain management training to overcome potential psychological and emotional factors. Virtual reality applications could become an innovative treatment tool in this setting – targeting pain perception right in the brain.
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Image: Several medical masks as well as other disposable waste products in a trash can; Copyright: PantherMedia / Fotofabrika

PantherMedia / Fotofabrika

How to reduce plastic waste: innovative process promises recycling of single-use face masks

01.03.2022

The COVID-19 pandemic forced the use of disposable face masks. Discarding them has become an environmental challenge on a global scale. This has prompted the Fraunhofer Cluster of Excellence Circular Plastics Economy CCPE and the Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT to develop an innovative recycling process for used plastics.
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Image: a smiling man stands in front of a white 3D printer; Copyright: Gabriel Salg/Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg

Gabriel Salg/Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg

Using 3D printing to create insulin-producing cells

22.02.2022

3D printing opens a world of endless possibilities – for both industrial and medical applications. A cross-national project recently created tissue that produces insulin, spelling hope for patients with diabetes.
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Image: Care workers in overalls in a patient room; Copyright: PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

PantherMedia / Wavebreakmedia ltd

Better management of hospital resources in pandemic times through DNA measurement

15.02.2022

For nearly two years, the COVID-19 pandemic has kept a firm grip on the world and caused many intensive care units to hit full capacity. It would help medical professionals tremendously if they could make a reliable prognosis the moment patients are hospitalized. cfDNA screening could play an important role in the assessment of COVID-19 severity in patients.
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Image: Hand-made duty roster; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Mathias Fengler

AI: Automating healthcare workforce planning

01.02.2022

The shortage of healthcare workers is a social challenge that must be properly addressed. Pradtke GmbH teamed up with the Bochum Institute of Technology gGmbH and contec GmbH in the research project titled "AI-powered healthcare workforce planning and management" (KI-unterstützte Personaleinsatzplanung und-steuerung im Gesundheitswesen, KI-PEPS).
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Image: The Harmony COVID-19 test; Copyright: Mark Stone/University of Washington

Mark Stone/University of Washington

Fast and cheap test can detect COVID-19 virus' genome without need for PCR

25.01.2022

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new test for COVID-19 that combines the speed of over-the-counter antigen tests with the accuracy of PCR tests that are processed in medical labs and hospitals.
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Image: A prototype wearable sensor,; Copyright: KAUST; Olga Kasimova

KAUST; Olga Kasimova

Fitness sensor warns when you're at your limits

04.01.2022

Wearable device alerts users about muscle fatigue by monitoring pH levels of sweat. Ultrathin nanomaterials, known as MXenes, are poised to make it easier to monitor a person’s well-being by analyzing their perspiration.
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Image: PASPORT, a new saliva-based COVID-19 ART test; Copyright: Duke-NUS Medical School

Duke-NUS Medical School

COVID-19 saliva Amplified Antigen Rapid Test is as sensitive as PCR test

09.12.2021

A potentially game-changing Antigen Rapid Test (ART) technology to diagnose COVID-19 has been developed by scientists in Singapore. Using a proprietary on-kit amplification technique, a person's saliva can be self-administered or tested for the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Image: a woman is getting her eyes scanned for diseases; Copyright: PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

PantherMedia / Robert Przybysz

Deep Learning: How artificial neural networks can support diagnostics

03.12.2021

The use of artificial intelligence and deep learning in medical diagnostics is growing rapidly. Ubotica’s neural network is based on deep learning and detects the presence of diabetic retinopathy in retinal images. Dr. Holger Pfeifer talks about the project successes, and reveals the obstacles researchers must continue to overcome in adopting deep learning systems.
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Image: Professor Dr. Danny Jonigk and Christopher Werlein; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

New X-ray technique shows vascular damage in intact COVID-19 lungs for first time

05.11.2021

When the coronavirus enters the lung, it causes massive tissue damage. Now, an international research team has been able to demonstrate for the first time, using a highly innovative X-ray technique in a non-destructive manner, that severe COVID-19 causes massive remodelling of the finest blood vessels by causing normally separate blood systems to join together with unusual frequency.
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Image: The new procedure is intended to detect the causes of back problems more efficiently; Copyright: SZB

SZB

Back problems: AI will provide personalised diagnosis

02.11.2021

Back problems are generally regarded as a widespread disease with many sufferers struggling with pain. A team of researchers from TU Kaiserslautern, the University Medical Centre in Mainz and several companies is working on a method that will enable more efficient monitoring of malpositions and strains on the back. Artificial intelligence methods are also being used.
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Image: lexandra Hansard, Sanjay Gokhale and George Alexandrakis; Copyright: UT Arlington

UT Arlington

Wearable device could reduce racial disparities in blood measurements

29.10.2021

Bioengineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Arlington, in collaboration with Austin’s Shani Biotechnologies, LLC, have developed a new noninvasive technology that may help real-time monitoring of key blood parameters, such as hemoglobin, especially in Black patients.
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Image: Professor Dr Peter Hillemanns and PD Dr Matthias Jentschke with the HPV self-tests; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Prevention of cervical cancer with HPV self-testing

28.10.2021

Cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases of the female reproductive organs. Human papilloma viruses are almost always responsible for cervical cancer and the corresponding precancerous lesions. As part of the statutory preventive medical check-up, women from the age of 20 can have a cell smear taken from the cervix once a year, the so-called Pap test, to detect cell changes.
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Image: The researchers incorporated their sensor into a prototype with a fiber optic tip that can detect changes in fluorescence in the test sample; Copyright: MIT

MIT

Carbon nanotube-based sensor can detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins

26.10.2021

Using specialized carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have designed a novel sensor that can detect SARS-CoV-2 without any antibodies, giving a result within minutes. Their new sensor is based on technology that can quickly generate rapid and accurate diagnostics, not just for Covid-19 but for future pandemics, the researchers say.
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Image: Ion track nanotechnology from GSI Materials Research creates a highly sensitive nanopore.; Copyright: GSI/FAIR

GSI/FAIR

New sensor for SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses based on GSI nanotechnology

12.10.2021

Easy and fast detection of viruses are crucial in a pandemic. Based on single-nanopore membranes of GSI, an international interdisciplinary team of researchers developed a test method that detects SARS-CoV-2 in saliva, without sample pretreatment, with the same sensitivity as a qPCR test, and in only 2 hours. On top, the sensor can distinguish infectious from non-infectious corona viruses.
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Image: Data sheets and ampoules on a desk; Copyright: PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

PantherMedia / eaglesky (YAYMicro)

Diligent helpers in data analysis: How AI becomes transparent and reproducible

01.10.2021

Huge amounts of data are generated in the laboratory every day, which have to be analyzed by hand. This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes into play as a perfect helper: Because it evaluates such data volumes faster than humans ever could. The only problem with AI is: when it is developed, there is hardly any guideline or standard that makes AI systems comparable with each other.
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Image: a robot arm holding a small glass; Copyright: PantherMedia / Bork

PantherMedia / Bork

The smart lab: Between manual work and digitization

01.10.2021

In the laboratory, there is some work that is time-consuming and monotonous – making it the perfect place for digital solutions such as artificial intelligence or robotics. But what work can these systems really take on in a meaningful way, in which areas of the lab are they present today, and where do they still need to be improved?
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Image: Production of the new surgical masks that can deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Asociación RUVID

Researchers release masks that instantaneously deactivate SARS-CoV-2

20.09.2021

Researchers released a new type IIR surgical mask with an intelligent fabric that can instantaneously deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19.
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Image: a tiny plaster with some gel on it; Copyright: NTU Singapore

NTU Singapore

New therapy for chronic wounds

10.09.2021

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), the Skin Research Institute of Singapore (SRIS), and local biotech start-up Celligenics are working together to develop accessible and affordable therapies to accelerate healing in chronic wounds such as diabetic ulcers and bed sores.
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Image: Portable genomics device; Copyright: Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao

SARS-CoV-2: portable sequencing platform for developing countries

02.09.2021

Philippine Genome Center Mindanao (PGC Mindanao) has partnered with Accessible Genomics, a group of volunteering scientists from all around the world to implement a low start-up cost genomic sequencing platform for laboratories in developing countries.
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Image: Senior woman holding the hand of a doctor; Copyright: PantherMedia/Lighthunter

PantherMedia/Lighthunter

Rehab device enables stroke patients with arm disabilities to do more physical training

02.09.2021

The GribAble device, created by researchers at Imperial College London and clinicians at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, consists of a lightweight electronic handgrip that interacts wirelessly with a standard PC tablet to enable the user to play arm-training games.
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Image: Drawing inspiration from nature, a team of international scientists have invented a smart device for personalized skin care modeled after the male diving beetle; Copyright: McGill University

McGill University

A skin crawling treatment for acne

01.09.2021

Drawing inspiration from nature, a team of international scientists have invented a smart device for personalized skin care modeled after the male diving beetle. This tool collects and monitors body fluids while sticking to the skin’s surface, paving the way for more accurate diagnostics and treatment for skin diseases and conditions like acne.
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Image: a woman with dark hair doing sit ups, wearing a fitnesstracker; Copyright: Robert Bosch GmbH

Robert Bosch GmbH

Avoid injuries, improve training – with self-learning sensors

01.09.2021

Artificial intelligence, sensors, wearables: they all collect and process data from their wearers. They are particularly popular in sports, because users no longer have to rely on their intuition, but can optimise their training based on sober, exact data. However, wearables are often criticized for being not only practical gadgets but also data krakens.
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Image: Closeup view with selective focus of shiny glittering  water balls hydrogel; Copyright: PantherMedia/PhotoChowk

PantherMedia/PhotoChowk

Improving strength, stretchiness and adhesion in hydrogels for wound healing

31.08.2021

Scientists use the adhesive capabilities of mussels as a model for optimizing hydrogels’ mechanical properties.
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Image: Scientist with pipette in laboratory ; Copyright: PantherMedia/alexraths

PantherMedia/lucadp

Genetic test better than blood test for cardiovascular diseases

31.08.2021

Determining an individual’s blood group based on genetic tests instead of merely traditional blood tests can provide a better picture of the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
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Image: Emergency cardiology. ecg with supraventricular arrhythmias and brief atrial fibrillation ; Copyright: PantherMedia/Olga355

PantherMedia/Olga355

Screening for atrial fibrillation could reduce risk of stroke

30.08.2021

Screening for atrial fibrillation in 75- and 76-year-olds could reduce the risk of stroke, severe bleeding and death, according to a study at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that has been published.
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Image: Woman wearing a FFP2 facemask in a Flower store, Copyright: Gettyimages

Gettyimages

Optimal usage time for face coverings

23.08.2021

Researchers from Surrey's renowned Global Centre for Clean Air Research (GCARE) explore two key questions: how long a mask should be worn; and when should it be discarded, recycled or washed to optimise its usage time.
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Image: Participant trains in the Ekso GT during an inpatient gait training session; Copyright: Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation

High-dose gait training with robotic exoskeleton after acute stroke

09.08.2021

Preliminary findings by Kessler researchers show that the use of a robotic exoskeleton during inpatient rehabilitation for acute stroke may improve function. Gait training in the robotic exoskeleton can provide high-dose therapy soon after stroke, when it is likely to have its maximal effect on functional ambulation.
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Image: a woman doing a breath test; Copyright: PantherMedia / imagepointfr

PantherMedia / imagepointfr

Breath test to determine correct treatment for epilepsy

03.08.2021

Epilepsy affects some 50 million people worldwide and pharmaceutical treatment of the disease is a tightrope walk, as the dose must be tailored precisely to the individual patient: "Slightly too little and it isn't effective. Slightly too much and it becomes toxic," explains Professor Pablo Sinues.
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Image: a transportable device that visually resembles a pistol; Copyright: REACT

REACT

Life-saving device rapidly stops bleeding from knife wounds

05.07.2021

Joseph Bentley, a final year Product Design and Technology student, has designed REACT – a new method for rapidly stopping catastrophic blood loss from a knife wound that could be carried out by first responding police officers while waiting for an ambulance.
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Image: a man and a roboter in the theatre; Copyright: PantherMedia/ekkasit919

PantherMedia/ekkasit919

Exploring possible applications of robotic surgery

09.03.2021

Robotics has been gaining importance in many areas of life for years, not least in medicine. Robots are already being used in the operating room today, but they do not always play the leading role – a circumstance that will certainly change in the long term.
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Image: disinfection of a door handle around which coronaviruses are flying; Copyright: PantherMedia/AntonMatyukha

Necessity is the mother of invention – innovations in the corona pandemic

01.03.2021

Keeping your distance, washing your hands, wearing a mask – such protective measures have been the order of the day since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic began. But appropriate products or procedures are not suitable for everyone, are often unavailable or, despite everything, carry a residual risk. The need for new, better solutions is high. But necessity is the mother of invention.
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Image: Finger of a woman touches sketch of a luminous light bulb; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andreus

Hygiene and disinfection: innovations against Covid-19

01.03.2021

When urgently needed products such as masks become scarce or conventional disinfection processes reach their limits, inventiveness is called for. And there is usually plenty of it in times of crisis. What innovations has the current corona pandemic already produced? How can they supplement or even replace existing products and processes?
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Image: stretchy skin patch; Copyright: Wang lab/UC San Diego

Wang lab/UC San Diego

Wearables: skin patch as an all-in-one health monitor

17.02.2021

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Tissue Engineering and Bioprinting – From artificial heart valves and printed humans

27.01.2021

Drug research and artificial skin replacement - these are the areas in which tissue engineering and bioprinting are already used today. What else could be possible in the future? We asked Dr. Nadine Nottrodt from Fraunhofer ILT and Prof. Sabine Neuß-Stein from RWTH Aachen University Hospital!
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Image: young man in profile looking at his smartphone laughing; Copyright: PantherMedia/yacobchuk1

mHealth for asthma: Help me manage it myself!

11.01.2021

According to the WHO, around 600 million people worldwide suffer from chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma. Key in the fight against these diseases is therapy adherence, but many sufferers often find this difficult. The result is increased hospitalization, which ultimately comes at the expense of the healthcare system. Smart and mobile technologies could change that.
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Image: Asthma monitoring device is taped to the chest; Copyright: Respia

Breathe a sigh of relief with Respia

01.01.2021

There are many different kinds of mobile devices to help people with chronic diseases. Asthma is one of those diseases, which can be monitored with wearables to improve everyday life. Especially for parents, the stress and anxiety which come with asthma-afflicted children can be reduced with a reliable solution like Respia.
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Image: Sense Glucose Earring on a model; Copyright: The University of Huddersfield

The University of Huddersfield

Sense Glucose Earring for managing type 1 diabetes

10.12.2020

A product design graduate from the University of Huddersfield has defeated thousands of entries from around the world to become one of the finalists of the 2020 Global Grad Show with their design for a discrete earring that monitors blood sugar levels and delivers feedback in real-time.
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Image: lung sound recording device; Copyright: TU Graz

TU Graz

COVID-19: Screening system for lung sound analysis

08.12.2020

Our bodies constantly make sounds that are not always audible to the naked ear. The occurrence of certain noises or changes in normal sounds can be an indication of illness. Using the example of the lung, a research team at Graz University of Technology has been intensively engaged in noise recording and the development of computer-aided analysis methods as a supplement to medical diagnosis.
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Image: wound-healing gel; Copyright: RUDN University

RUDN University

Wound-healing gel with metabolic products of trichoderma

07.12.2020

Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry of RUDN University developed a wound-healing gel based on a substance that is produced by Trichoderma fungi. The results of the study were published in the Nov.-Dec. 2020 issue Systematic Reviews in Pharmacy journal.
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Image: cell matrix; Copyright: TU Wien

Multi-photon lithography: printing cells with micrometer accuracy

01.12.2020

How do cells react to certain drugs? And how exactly is new tissue created? This can be analyzed by using bioprinting to embed cells in fine frameworks. However, current methods are often imprecise or too slow to process cells before they are damaged. At the TU Vienna, a high-resolution bioprinting process has now been developed using a new bio-ink.
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Image: Illustrations of various 3D-printed prostheses, implants and organs; Copyright: PantherMedia/annyart

Printed life – possibilities and limits of bioprinting

01.12.2020

Implants, prostheses and various other components made of plastic, metal or ceramics are already being produced by additive manufacturing. But skin, blood vessels or entire organs from the printer – is that possible? For years now, intensive research has been underway into the production of biologically functional tissue using printing processes. Some things are already possible with bioprinting.
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Image: 3D printer with a human heart inside, next to a box with

Bioprinting: life from the printer

01.12.2020

It aims at the production of test systems for drug research and gives patients on the waiting lists for donor organs hope: bioprinting. Thereby biologically functional tissues are printed. But how does that actually work? What are the different bioprinting methods? And can entire organs be printed with it? These and other questions are examined in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: three vials, one with hydrogels, one with bio ink and one with unmodified gelatine; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGB

"Cells are highly sensitive" – material development for bioprinting

01.12.2020

The big hope of bioprinting is to someday be able to print whole human organs. So far, the process has been limited to testing platforms such as organs-on-a-chip. That's because the actual printing process already poses challenges. Scientists need suitable printing materials that ensure the cell's survival as it undergoes the procedure. The Fraunhofer IGB is researching and analyzing this aspect.
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Image: Physician checks function of an arm prosthesis; Copyright: PantherMedia/belahoche

PantherMedia/belahoche

Bionic prosthesis: easy to put on, intuitive to use

22.09.2020

Patients who receive a prosthesis after the amputation of a limb often have to train for weeks or months until they can control the technology and use it in everyday life without problems. At the Medical University of Vienna, the world's first bionic prosthesis has now been developed that has a closed control loop and enables immediate, intuitive use.
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Image: Application of AR sonography; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGD

Fraunhofer IGD

Augmented reality ultrasound: putting the focus on patients

10.08.2020

This is how a conventional ultrasound scan works: patients lie down on a table next to the ultrasound machine. A doctor uses a probe to scan the part of the body in question, while he or she looks at the pictures on a monitor. In other words, the physician either focuses on his/her hand on the patient or the monitor. The Fraunhofer IGD wants to change this process as part of the "sonAR" project.
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Image: Nurse checking surveillance monitor at the bedside and writing down patient data on a clipboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

PantherMedia/Kzenon

Big Data: early warning system for the ICU

03.08.2020

Patient monitoring systems in the ICU sound up to 700 alarms on average per patient per day, which boils down to one alarm every two minutes. An excessive number of them are false alarms. This generates vast amounts of data, which can make it difficult for doctors and nurses to identify the most critical alarms to manage. It also has a negative effect on the treatment of intensive care patients.
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Image: Person with VR glasses in a room; Copyright: EXXETA AG

EXXETA AG

Gamification: facilitating a gradual return-to-play

08.06.2020

Professional athletes depend on a speedy recovery from sports injuries or surgery because their livelihood depends on their physical fitness. Returning to competition too soon after injury can have negative health consequences. Standard tests are now combined with virtual reality to determine the optimal time to return to play.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02.06.2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: Ambulance on the road; Copyright: PantherMedia / inhabitant

PantherMedia / inhabitant

Mobile stroke units: improved outcomes for ischemic stroke

02.06.2020

If someone is having a stroke, you call an ambulance. But getting to the hospital can be time-consuming. To prevent long-term disabilities and death, patients need to be treated as quickly as possible. According to a recent study by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, mobile stroke units play a key role in this setting.
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Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23.03.2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22.01.2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: patient with pain in fingers; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Milkos

APRICOT-project: implant "help(s) patients heal themselves"

01.01.2020

Today, people tend to live longer, while an increasing number of patients suffer from osteoarthritis. Even younger generations are now at a higher risk of getting osteoarthritis due to the frequent use of mobile devices. The EU research project APRICOT aims to develop a novel type of implant for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hands – helping patients heal themselves.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12.12.2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: elderly woman in a wheelchair showing a nurse something on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Smart care: safety and support thanks to AAL

02.12.2019

Average life expectancy keeps increasing, while birth rates are declining – at least when it comes to most industrial nations. The coming decades will see a decreasing number of gainfully employed people versus more and more senior citizens and people in need of care. It's a trend that already pushes healthcare to the brink. That's why we desperately need new concepts. One of them is AAL.
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Image: elderly woman with a tablet on her lap; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Ambient Assisted Living: sensors for seniors

02.12.2019

Our ageing society is confronted with fewer and fewer workers. One of the many consequences is a shortage of skilled nursing staff. Ambient Assisted Living should solve this problem. By equipping the living environment of elderly people or people in need of care with (technical) assistance systems, they are to be given more self-determination and security. The nursing staff also benefits.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02.12.2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: several people standing around a bed with a stand-up function on which one person sits; Copyright: Ralf Lienert/Allgäuer Zeitung

AAL Living Lab: research, education and raising awareness

02.12.2019

Smart home systems are a perfect example of how technology can make our daily lives easier. The fact that they can use a tablet to adjust lighting and blinds in every room benefits older adults in more ways than one. These types of technical systems are a part of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) and create a safe living environment for older persons.
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Image: Blood sample labelled

panthermedia.net/olanstock

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08.11.2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: Modern diabetes therapies; Copyright: beta-web GmbH

Digital and personalized diabetes management

21.10.2019

Digital blood glucose measurement via a sensor on the arm, glucose values in an app and data evaluation with the help of software: diabetes experts, product specialists at Roche Diabetes Care Germany and a patient talk in our report on MEDICA.de about the future of diabetes treatment.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01.10.2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: Connection of medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019: Experience tomorrow's innovations today

01.10.2019

The medical market is booming - medical ideas and visions for the future are more in demand than ever. Especially at MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019 young founders want to present their product innovations. Develop business contacts, meet investors and experience an international environment in just one place. Discover in our Topic of the Month what makes MEDICA START-UP PARK unique.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01.10.2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23.09.2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22.08.2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01.07.2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03.06.2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03.06.2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01.03.2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Preemie doll with drug delivery system on the nose; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Gentle medication for the little ones – with every breath

22.02.2019

According to the WHO, ten percent of babies worldwide are born prematurely. Since most organs of these tiny babies have not fully developed yet, it can quickly lead to complications and disorders and most notably affect the lungs of the premature infants. What's more, infections require gentle treatment, as the preemies themselves are fragile and susceptible – making this a challenging situation.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Marc Eisele, Universitätsklinikum Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – "TelePark"- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08.01.2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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