MEDICA: Information Systems & Software
Menu

Image: Woman with blonde hair and a light blue blouse smiles at the camera. There are trees in the background; Copyright: Karolinska Institutet

Karolinska Institutet

Breast cancer: more cases detected with the help of AI

15.09.2023

One radiologist supported by AI detected more cases of breast cancer in screening mammography than two radiologists working together, reports the ScreenTrustCAD study from Karolinska Institutet in The Lancet Digital Health.
Read more
Image: A close-up of a hand holding a premature baby in the incubator; Copyright: wirestock

wirestock

Premature infants: early detection of vascular disease

14.09.2023

Dr. Anne Hilgendorff’s team from Helmholtz Munich and the LMU University Hospital developed a non-invasive method with no need for sedation using MR imaging to detect early signs of vascular disease associated with chronic pulmonary impairment in premature infants, offering new avenues for risk stratification and potential prevention of complications later in life.
Read more
Image: Ultrasound technology is used in the transcranial ultrasound stimulation laboratory by a woman and a man on a female patient; Copyright: University of Plymouth

University of Plymouth

Targeted ultrasound can change brain functions for up to an hour

13.09.2023

A study published in Nature Communications suggests transcranial ultrasound stimulation can be used in a targeted way to change specific types of activity within the brain for up to an hour after intervention.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

From under one roof: x-ray equipment and its software

30.08.2023

We visited Oehm & Rehbein. The German company offers everything from a single source. In the interview, Managing Director Bernd Oehm tells us why this pays off and what the experts in X-ray equipment are currently working on.
Read more
Image: Hands of a surgeon on the control console of a surgical robot; Copyright: Gerain0812

Gerain0812

Sensor-controlled precision: the future of surgical tumor removal

22.08.2023

The complete removal of malignant tumors is a decisive factor for the success of cancer treatment. Until now, the tissue examinations required for this have been time-consuming. In the future, sensor-based methods could come into play to help surgeons detect tumor boundaries more accurately and thus perform a more precise operation.
Read more
Image: Diagram of a brain, with brain areas marked in colour; Copyright: MPI CBS

MPI CBS

The anatomy of memory: new mnemomic networks discovered in the brain

21.08.2023

Using a novel approach of precision neuroimaging and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), neuroscientists and physicists at MPI CBS in Leipzig (Germany) and anatomist Menno Witter from the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Trondheim (Norway) have now ventured into the depths of the human memory system.
Read more
Image: Jonathan Holzman and Alexis Guidi are exploring the potential of terahertz radiation to improve the quality of medical diagnostic imaging; Copyright: UBC Okanagan

UBC Okanagan

Riding a wave to better medical diagnosis

18.08.2023

New UBC Okanagan research takes aim at improving diagnostic imaging
Read more
Image: A doctor palpates a patient's lymph nodes in the examination room; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Study: Fluidity predicts aggressiveness of cancerous tumours

17.08.2023

Researchers discovered that the consistency of a tumor can have a decisive influence on the further course of cancer.
Read more
Image: Immune cells in blue and vessels in pink in the bone marrow of the skull; Copyright: Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

A new ally in fighting brain diseases: our very own skull

16.08.2023

Alzheimer's, stroke, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases cause severe damage due to neuroinflammation mediated by immune cells.
Read more
Image: A woman sits on the bed and holds her stomach in pain; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

AI could shorten the diagnostic journey of millions suffering from endometriosis

16.08.2023

The quality of life of millions suffering from endometriosis – a painful disease where sensitive tissue grows outside of the uterus – could be improved by a new artificial intelligence (AI) system with technology developed by the University of Adelaide in South Australia, in partnership with researchers from the University of Surrey.
Read more
Image: A patient is wheeled into a CT scanner. The patient smiles; Copyright: AZ-BLT

AZ-BLT

New imaging technology for a quick look inside a human being

04.08.2023

Physicists at the University of Würzburg have succeeded in making a new imaging technique ready for use on humans. Radioactive markers and radiation are not necessary for this.
Read more
Image: The superior cervical ganglion of a mouse: Here, neurons that control the heart muscle are in close proximity to those that control the pineal gland; Copyright: Karin Ziegler / TUM

Karin Ziegler / TUM

Cardiac disease: new technique shows cause of sleep disturbance

27.07.2023

In a paper published in the journal Science, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows that heart diseases affect the production of the sleep hormone melatonin in the pineal gland.
Read more
Image: Woman hands holding human brain over green wheat field; Copyright: Masson-Simon

Masson-Simon

Brain: a varied life boosts functional networks

18.07.2023

The findings in mice provide unprecedented insights into the complexity of large-scale neural networks and brain plasticity. Moreover, they could pave the way for new brain-inspired artificial intelligence methods.
Read more
Image: Left: Chest radiograph Right: Visualization of the grounds for the AI's judgment; Copyright: Daiju Ueda, OMU

Daiju Ueda, OMU

AI classifies cardiac functions, heart disease

14.07.2023

Osaka Metropolitan University scientists have unveiled an innovative use of AI that classifies cardiac functions and pinpoints valvular heart disease with unprecedented accuracy, demonstrating continued progress in merging the fields of medicine and technology to advance patient care.
Read more
Image: Images of complex brain structures. On the left these structures are difficult to see, on the right they are shown more clearly; Copyright: Johann Danzl

Johann Danzl

Brain: LIONESS enables insights into complex tissue

13.07.2023

In a new paper, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) has come together to present a new way to observe the brain’s structure and dynamics – in a high resolution and without damaging the tissue.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a female eye in purple-blue futuristic design concept; Copyright: lassedesignen/Shutterstock

lassedesignen/Shutterstock

Multiple sclerosis: new biomarker for early diagnosis

12.07.2023

A study conducted by researchers from the Department of Neurology at MedUni Vienna and University Hospital Vienna has demonstrated for the first time that diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be significantly improved by additionally measuring the thickness of retinal layers in the eye.
Read more
Image: Nurse in mask with cardiac patient at doctor's appointment shows heart chart on tablet in modern clinic; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Coronary heart disease: recommendations for imaging diagnostics

11.07.2023

An interdisciplinary team of clinicians and scientists has published a consensus paper recommending appropriate quantitative imaging techniques for coronary artery stenosis and atherosclerosis related treatment and procedural planning.
Read more
Image: Close-up of an ultrasound scan of a female abdomen by a female doctor; Copyright: Natabuena

Natabuena

Functional imaging: intestinal and liver diseases mutually influence each other

06.07.2023

The research groups of Prof. Trautwein (University Hospital RWTH Aachen) and Prof. Hengstler (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors in Dortmund) have made a surprising discovery about the interaction of the liver and the intestine.
Read more
Image: Two young men in white coats, Dr. Jonas Hall and Dr. Niklas Klümper, pose in front of the camera in a research complex; Copyright: University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

Metastatic renal cell carcinoma: improved prediction of therapy response

29.06.2023

The study demonstrates a significant improvement in predicting the response to therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma by incorporating the level of inflammation, which was assessed using two straightforward blood parameters, alongside the conventional imaging-based approach.
Read more
Image: Man with short brown hair, glasses and a blue shirt, Prof. Thomas Klockgether, smiles at the camera; Copyright: University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

Ataxias: international award for Bonn patient care and research

28.06.2023

The Ataxia Center at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and DZNE have been awarded the title “Ataxia Center of Excellence” by the US National Ataxia Foundation (NAF) for their patient care and research – as the only organization in Europe.
Read more
Image: Fluorine-18-labelled folate PET/CT 3D fusion image of a rat subject with a glioma visible in the central region of the brain; Copyright: Maxwell Miner

Maxwell Miner

PET imaging: discovery can help detect brain tumours

22.06.2023

Folate-based radiopharmaceuticals can be used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to detect folate receptors in brain tumours. The discovery of folate receptors and their exploitation potential with respect to brain tumours is a new and significant finding in the field.
Read more
 Image: Infant lying in a mobile MRI unit with a doctor holding a tablet and a woman sitting next to him; Copyright: University Hospital Bonn (UKB)/A. Winkler

University Hospital Bonn (UKB)/A. Winkler

Mobile MRI: Gates Foundation funds world's first examinations in children under ECMO

20.06.2023

The University Hospital of Bonn (UKB) is the first hospital in the world to examine and monitor children receiving ECMO therapy with a mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. This was possible thanks to a funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Read more
Image: Colored image of cortical tissue; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

MRI shows new altered neural circuits in Huntington's disease

16.06.2023

Huntington’s disease is a genetically-based neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric disorders in the affected individuals. Understanding the alterations in the neural circuits in this disorder is essential in order to design therapeutic approaches.
Read more
Image: Viral Microscope View. 3D illustration of a corona virus in blue color; Copyright: maxxyustas

maxxyustas

Corona: The virus needs only a single door opener

15.06.2023

Why is the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus able to spread so efficiently? Various hypotheses are still circulating in the scientific community. A group of researchers from Würzburg has now found groundbreaking answers.
Read more
Image: Device for scanning and diagnostic viewing of patients; Copyright: mstandret

mstandret

AI in eye scans: improved diagnosis of inherited disease of the retina

14.06.2023

Researchers from the UK and Germany have used artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a system that they believe will enable more widespread provision of testing, together with improved efficiency.
Read more
Image: Schleswig-Holstein's Minister President Daniel Günther opened the

Staatskanzlei SH

AI from the universities in Kiel and San Francisco launched

14.06.2023

A delegation from the CAU and UKSH joined Schleswig-Holstein's Minister President Daniel Günther in opening the new infrastructure for AI in the USA in the night of 8 June 2023 (German time).
Read more
Image: Micrograph: Certain immune cells called microglia (yellow) remove amyloid plaques (magenta) in the brain of an Alzheimer's mouse; Copyright: MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

Dementia: poorly insulated nerve cells promote Alzheimer's disease in old age

08.06.2023

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have shown that defective myelin actively promotes disease-related changes in Alzheimer’s. Slowing down age-related myelin damage could open up new ways to prevent the disease or delay its progression in the future.
Read more
Image: Using data from magnetic resonance imaging, the researchers were able to compare the brains of healthy and fibromyalgia sufferers; Copyright: Benjamin Mosch

Benjamin Mosch

Imaging: MRI shows how fibromyalgia changes the brain

05.06.2023

A team from the LWL Clinic for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, has investigated the brain changes that are related to the disorder.
Read more
Image: A doctor conducts MRI diagnostics of the brain on the computer in a modern clinic; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

AI tool for MRI may spot brain damage in college athletes

02.06.2023

An artificial intelligence computer program that processes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately identify changes in brain structure that result from repeated head injury, a new study in student athletes shows.
Read more
Image: Visualization of a radioactive preparation that docks onto blood cells in a bloodstream; Copyright: B. Schröder/HZDR

B. Schröder/HZDR

Cancer: new theranostic for imaging and treatment

01.06.2023

Thanks to the radiation they emit, radioactive compounds are suited both to imaging and treating cancers. By appropriately combining them in novel, so-called radionuclide theranostics, both applications can be dovetailed.
Read more
Image: A silver medical device with a large display on a table in a physician's office; Copyright: NIMBLE Diagnostics SL

NIMBLE Diagnostics SL

Imaging: monitoring cardiovascular stents with microwaves

30.05.2023

A cardiovascular stent may fail after implantation. Patients with arteriosclerosis then must undergo angiography again. The condition of the stent is examined or a new stent is placed during this procedure. Barcelona-based company NIMBLE Diagnostics is now working on an easier method to monitor stents after implantation.
Read more
Image: Two men and a woman in a doctor's coat: the woman is holding a map of the world and the two men are pointing to Germany and Uzbekistan with a pen; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

With ultrasound against liver cancer

24.05.2023

The Hannover Medical School (MHH) enters into a clinic partnership with Uzbekistan and supports with a training program for sonography diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).
Read more
Image: OR monitor that shows heart rate and other vital parameters, behind it an OR team; Copyright: bilanol

bilanol

OptoCarDi: searching for new diagnostic options to assess the heart muscle

16.05.2023

The preparations for the OptoCarDi project at the EAH Jena and the Jena University Hospital (UKJ) are in full swing. Starting in June 2023, a research team led by Prof. Iwan Schie (Biomedical Engineering), Prof. Robert Brunner (Miniaturized Optical Sensor Systems) and the cardiologists Prof. Sven Möbius-Winkler and Prof. Christian Schulze will develop an optical catheter prototype.
Read more
Image: 3D cross section of a kidney; Copyright: European Cooperation in Science and Technology

European Cooperation in Science and Technology

Imaging chronic kidney disease

12.05.2023

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has shown a high potential to distinguish biomarkers for CKD, but renal MRI biomarkers are currently underused in research and clinical practice.
Read more
Image: Multidimensional brain scan on a screen. In the background is an MRI room; Copyright: MedUni Wien

MedUni Wien

MRI imaging method without the need of radioactive substances

09.05.2023

Metabolic disorders play a central role in many common conditions, including Alzheimer's, depression, diabetes and cancer, which call for reliable as well as non-invasive diagnostic procedures.
Read more
Image: A female physician and an assistant are looking at MRI images on a screen; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

BioDevCenter: biologicals are the future of medicine

27.04.2023

Not all advances in medical technology immediately catch your eye – take biologicals, for example. These are molecules that are biotechnologically designed for a specific application. In the German state of Baden-Württemberg, the Biologicals Development Center (BioDevCenter) and its infrastructure aim to bring them to market faster in the future.
Read more
Image: Colored Coronal TDI Image of the entire brain; Copyright: Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy

Duke Center for In Vivo Microscopy

MRI: Brain images just got 64 million times sharper

20.04.2023

In a decades-long technical tour de force lead by Duke’s Center for In Vivo Microscopy with colleagues at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, University of Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh and Indiana University, researchers took up the gauntlet and improved the resolution of MRI leading to the sharpest images ever captured of a mouse brain.
Read more
Image: Prof Asma Khalil using portable ultrasound device on patient; Copyright: St George's, University of London

St George's, University of London

Extra pregnancy scan slashes number of breech births and risk to babies

14.04.2023

Adding a third routine scan at the end of pregnancy can slash the number of unexpected breech births by 70% and the risks of the baby being born with severe health complications, according to research led by doctors at St George’s, University of London, and published in PLOS Medicine.
Read more
Image: An incubator crib in a paediatric intensive care unit in a university hospital; Copyright: DC_Studio

Mint_Images

Bedside portable MRI: use in pediatric ECMO patients

13.04.2023

The neonatology team at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) has conducted the world's first study of children receiving ECMO therapy using the mobile magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The procedure, known as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), involves oxygenating the blood outside the body.
Read more
Image: 3D illustration of a human body showing the gastrointestinal tract highlighted; Copyright: SciePro/Shutterstock

SciePro/Shutterstock

Morbus Crohn: new imaging technique for effective therapy

12.04.2023

An interdisciplinary research group at MedUni Vienna has investigated a new imaging technique that can improve the treatment of intestinal strictures from Morbus Crohn.
Read more
Image: Group picture of the representatives of Nimble Diagnostics (thirteen persons); Copyright: Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC)

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC)

Stent implants: Nimble Diagnostics closes financing round of one million euros

10.04.2023

NIMBLE Diagnostics, a spin-off of the Germans Trias i Pujol Research Institute (IGTP), the UPC and the University of Barcelona (UB), has successfully closed a funding round led by Grow Ventures, together with Namarel Ventures and the Inveniam Group, that has secured more than one million euros.
Read more
Image: A man in a blue sweater, with short grey hair and glasses is looking into the tube of a tomograph, in which a phantom is positioned – Prof. Franz Pfeiffer; Copyright: Astrid Eckert / TUM

Astrid Eckert / TUM

COVID-19 and beyond: a deeper look into the lungs with dark-field X-rays

28.03.2023

Imaging reaches its limits when it comes to looking at the lungs: Alveoli are tiny, balloon-shaped air sacs in our lungs. These tissue structures are micrometers in diameter and currently cannot be visualized directly. Meanwhile, they exhibit early changes prompted by lung diseases such as COVID-19. Dark-field X-ray images could visualize these signs in the future.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

MRI in a class of its own

28.03.2023

Better images in less time – the new MRI at Cologne-Porz Hospital uses artificial intelligence to produce the most perfect images possible from inside the body. The flexible receiver coils play an important role in this, as they also significantly improve patient comfort.
Read more
Image: A woman with blond hair in a white coat sits in a laboratory and works with Petri dishes; Copyright: University of the West of Scotland

University of the West of Scotland

Radiology: Research could improve cancer treatment

22.03.2023

UWS School of Computing Engineering and Physical Sciences are developing breakthrough investigations into advanced radiation treatment technique, after receiving funding from Cancer Research UK RadNet – the charity's radiation research network.
Read more
Image: Female doctor with purple ribbon, sign of Alzheimer's disease, pancreatic cancer, epilepsy, lupus day; Copyright: chormail

chormail

Solution to classify epileptic syndromes in near real-time

21.03.2023

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), close to 50 million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy, a chronic neurological disease, whose seizures are considered one of the main symptoms.
Read more
Image: Two women in medical attire and a man in a plaid shirt pose for the camera in a laboratory; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

Tool to diagnose and assess the severity of sarcopenia

20.03.2023

Sarcopenia is a degenerative disease characterised by a pathological decrease in muscle strength that particularly affects older people. Researchers at the University of Barcelona have developed a new tool to assess the presence and severity of this muscular deterioration.
Read more
Image: Closeup of ultrasound examination of abdominal cavity, stomach and heart with sonography sensor; Copyright: Natabuena

Natabuena

Ultrasound method could lead to easier disease diagnosis in body tissue

17.03.2023

A new ultrasound method that can measure the level of tension in human tissue for the first time - a key indicator of disease - has been developed by researchers from the University of Sheffield.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a scientist wearing protective clothing looking through a microscope; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Smart microscopy works out where to take the picture

16.03.2023

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have now developed a software solution for smart, data-driven microscopy, which makes this possible.
Read more
Image: Detailed measurement of how the motor protein kinesin-1 (red) walks on microtubules (white); Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Max-Planck-Institut für medizinische Forschung

Further advance in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

16.03.2023

Scientists led by Nobel Laureate Stefan Hell at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have developed a super-resolution microscope with a spatio-temporal precision of one nanometer per millisecond.
Read more
Image: Coronary artery disease surgery using off-pump technique Operation in the operating room; Copyright: photovs

photovs

Complex coronary artery disease: Stenting with close look inside blood vessel improves outcomes

10.03.2023

Patients with complex coronary artery disease who underwent a stenting procedure guided by intravascular imaging were nearly 40% less likely to die of heart disease, have a heart attack caused by a new blockage in the treated artery or need a repeat stenting procedure in the treated artery, compared with similar patients.
Read more
Image: Microscopic image: Mouse lymph nodes with colored fluorescent markers; Copyright: AG Hoelzel/UKB

AG Hoelzel/UKB

Artificial intelligence to help tumor immunology

09.03.2023

Developing methods to predict the nature of the tumor microenvironment is the goal of researchers from the Clusters of Excellence ImmunoSensation2 and the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics (HCM) led by Prof. Kevin Thurley at the University of Bonn.
Read more
Image: Two men in white laboratory clothing are working on new quantum light modules; Copyright: FBH/P. Immerz

FBH/P. Immerz

Entangled photon pairs to help fighting cancer

06.03.2023

The recently launched QEED project aims to significantly reduce measurement time in clinical cancer diagnostics by developing a spectrally resolved imaging technique based on entangled photon pairs. FBH scientists will develop the required diode lasers and quantum light modules.
Read more
Image: Balance exercises outdoors. Mature woman standing on one leg exercising balance; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Poor balance may indicate changes in brain volume

06.03.2023

In a study recently published in Gait & Posture, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that the volume of the hippocampus is correlated with a measure of balance ability in healthy older people.
Read more
Image: Mattias Ekstedt, senior associate professor at Linköping smiles at the camera; Copyright: Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Thor Balkhed/Linköping University

Adverse muscle composition associated with increased mortality risk in people with fatty liver disease

01.03.2023

Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle contribute to an increasing number of people developing fatty liver disease. There is a need for early detection of individuals at risk of developing sequelae.
Read more
Image: Image compares simulated results from imaging the human chest with ordinary radiography (left) and with phase-contrast radiography; Copyright: Häggmark et al., 2023

Häggmark et al., 2023

Early-stage lung disease could be detected with advanced imaging tech

24.02.2023

An imaging process that today is used mainly in research labs could potentially detect early-stage lung disease if developed for use in hospitals and clinics, a new research study shows.
Read more
Image: Two men and a woman stand in front of a building and smile for the camera; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

AI with infrared imaging enables precise colon cancer diagnostics

23.02.2023

Researchers at the Centre for Protein Diagnostics PRODI at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, are using artificial intelligence in combination with infrared imaging to optimally tailor colon cancer therapy to individual patients.
Read more
Image: Researchers at HIPS work with zebrafish larvae to detect potential side effects of new drugs at an early stage; Copyright: Dietze / HIPS

Dietze / HIPS

HIPS and CISPA join forces to make future active ingredients safer

23.02.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
Read more
Image: Immune cell trafficking in diabetic cataract formation.; Copyright: HAWK

HAWK

Imaging: role of immune cells in early diabetic cataract development

22.02.2023

The team of researchers, led by Prof. Dr. Ali Hafezi-Moghadam, Director of the Molecular Biomarkers Nano-Imaging Laboratory (MBNI), in collaboration with Professor Dr. Christoph Rußmann, Dean of the Health Campus and a Visiting Professor at MBNI, found early signs of damage in the eye before the onset of type 2 diabetes.
Read more
Image: Woman with ruptured blood vessel in eye, closeup; Copyright: amenic181

amenic181

AI finds twisting of eye vessels could cause high blood pressure and heart disease

16.02.2023

Research led by scientists at St George’s, University of London has discovered 119 areas in the genome that help to determine the size and shape of blood vessels at the back of the eye, and that an increase in ‘twisting’ of the arteries could cause high blood pressure and heart disease.
Read more
Image: A multiwell plate is filled with a liquid. A brain scan is visible under the plate; Copyright: Image-Source

Image-Source

Predicting dementia using neural network characteristics

13.02.2023

In many neurodegenerative conditions, brain changes occur before symptoms emerge. But now, researchers from Japan have found a new way to distinguish these conditions in the early stages according to changes in brain activity patterns.
Read more
Image: Professional portrait photo by Emilia Möller Rydberg; Copyright: Wingborg/University of Gothenburg

Wingborg/University of Gothenburg

Fewer surgically treated ankle fractures with clear-cut treatment routine

30.01.2023

It has been shown that the percentage of ankle fractures that undergo surgery could be substantially reduced, from more than 30 per cent to 10 in the most common type of fracture. The key is a clear-cut treatment routine that benefits both patients and caregivers, according to a doctoral dissertation at the University of Gothenburg.
Read more
Image: The word

margaritaylita

AI detects rare forms of dementia

20.01.2023

Researchers at MPI CBS and University of Leipzig Medical Center have used new artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning techniques to detect rare forms of dementia on MRI images.
Read more
Image: The photomontage shows PD Dr. Mark Kühnel (left) and Christopher Werlein at a multi-end microscope with a tissue section of the heart vessels remodeled by COVID19; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/Abb.

Karin Kaiser/Abb.

How COVID-19 permanently damages the heart

12.01.2023

An interdisciplinary research team from MHH has used innovative molecular methods and a high-resolution microscopy technique to show how the ongoing inflammation in COVID-19 attacks the heart tissue.
Read more
Image: Position of molecules on nanoparticle surfaces as a 3D illustration; Copyright: Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

How optical microscopes allow detailed investigations of nanoparticles

06.01.2023

In their project "Supercol"- funded by the European Union - scientists want to achieve the investigation of nanoparticles with light.
Read more
Image: A woman in a white coat with blue gloves sits at a large microscope; Copyright: LZH

LZH

Detecting bacterial infestation fast, contactless, and free of markers

05.01.2023

With a multimodal microscope, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) and three partners in the joint project PriMe want to make it possible to detect bacterial infestation using fast, marker-free, and contactless imaging.
Read more
Image: Oncologist looking at patients x-ray photos and making notes in red notebook; Copyright: sofiiashunkina

sofiiashunkina

Complete package for minimally invasive tumor therapy

04.01.2023

License agreement and joint development: Fraunhofer MEVIS commences cooperation with Israeli partner for worldwide use of innovative software technology in ultrasound-aided tumor ablation.
Read more

Setting new standards in mobile X-ray – Solutions for tomorrow AB

16.11.2022

Instead of bringing the patient to the X-ray unit, would it not be better to bring the X-ray unit to the patient? Solutions for tomorrow is a med-tech company creating innovative products that change the X-ray experience for hospitals, clinics and patients. At MEDICA 2022, we took a look at it.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

The artificial eye – imaging and AI

15.11.2022

Four eyes see more than two – but do artificial eyes also see more than real ones? In any case, radiologists will increasingly rely on the support of algorithms in the future. These programs do not tire, even when looking at countless images. At MEDICA 2022, we met companies that already rely on AI in imaging.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

In the think tank – Tour at MEDICA START-UP PARK

15.11.2022

For young companies there is a central contact point at MEDICA: the MEDICA START-UP PARK. Start-ups are given the opportunity here to present their ideas around the healthcare of the future and to get in touch with potential partners and investors. We talked to some of the start-ups during our highlight tour.
Read more
Image: scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells in the blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized treatment of acute stroke: diagnostics with 3D virtual histology

23.08.2022

Every minute counts when someone is having an acute stroke. If the cause is a vascular blockage caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the brain, detailed insights into the thrombus composition is critical to remove or dissolve it successfully and help restore blood flow. But that’s often easier said than done when "time is brain".
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Sonography training – Inexpensive models from the 3D printer

23.05.2022

Many medical disciplines rely on the tenet "Practice makes perfect". Sonography diagnostics is one of them. Unfortunately, constant training can be difficult, as patients with specific diseases are not present at a hospital all the time. The University Hospital Bonn is creating a solution for this problem: 3D printed models of joints and arteries are used in training.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Affair of the heart: MRI – Detecting coronary heart disease hazard patterns

03.02.2022

The University Hospital Düsseldorf is researching a new method of heart imaging in the MRI: It can detect the early formation of coronary heart disease and show associated lesions before they cause any symptoms. A contrast agent containing fluorine atoms is used for this. We learn more about this method in the video interview with Prof. Ulrich Flögel and Dr. Florian Bönner.
Read more
Image: CT scan of the abdomen with two red markers; Copyright: PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

PantherMedia/stockdevil_666

Computed tomography: Digital signals with photon-counting CT

01.02.2022

Does medicine get digital when we scan in diagnostic findings and digitize them in the process? It obviously is more efficient to record data directly in digital form, but not all diagnostic tools have this option. Computed tomography has now made enormous progress in this area: Unlike conventional CT technology, the new photon-counting CT directly creates digital image data.
Read more
Image: Preview picture to the video

Neonatology MRI for the youngest – Interview with Neoscan Solutions GmbH

15.11.2021

To detect impairments in infants as early as possible, physicians often use MRI. However, with conventional models, infants usually need to be sedated and transported to other departments. Neoscan Solutions have developed an MRI specifically for neonatology. We learn more about it at MEDICA 2021.
Read more
Image: Professor Dr. Danny Jonigk and Christopher Werlein; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

New X-ray technique shows vascular damage in intact COVID-19 lungs for first time

05.11.2021

When the coronavirus enters the lung, it causes massive tissue damage. Now, an international research team has been able to demonstrate for the first time, using a highly innovative X-ray technique in a non-destructive manner, that severe COVID-19 causes massive remodelling of the finest blood vessels by causing normally separate blood systems to join together with unusual frequency.
Read more
Image: The new procedure is intended to detect the causes of back problems more efficiently; Copyright: SZB

SZB

Back problems: AI will provide personalised diagnosis

02.11.2021

Back problems are generally regarded as a widespread disease with many sufferers struggling with pain. A team of researchers from TU Kaiserslautern, the University Medical Centre in Mainz and several companies is working on a method that will enable more efficient monitoring of malpositions and strains on the back. Artificial intelligence methods are also being used.
Read more
Image: X-ray image of a blood vessel with a catheter and a balloon; Copyright: PantherMedia/pitchayanank.hotmail.com

A look into the cardiovascular system: Possibilities of medical imaging

02.08.2021

A high degree of precision is required for operations involving the cardiovascular system. This is based on medical imaging. In practice, however, these still face a number of challenges that can impair image quality. The further development of imaging techniques represents a forward-looking field of research in order to be able to improve surgical treatment.
Read more
Image: A surgeon points at a screen that shows a roughly round shape; Copyright: PantherMedia/pitchayanank.hotmail.com

Medical imaging: obtaining an accurate view of blood vessels for surgery

02.08.2021

Surgical intervention is often inevitable when blood vessels become narrowed, blocked, or damaged. Surgeons use stents and medical balloons to open and widen the arteries, suck out the obstructing clots and use a catheter to examine the vessels. Intraoperative cardiovascular imaging is an essential tool to guide the catheters and instruments during the minimally invasive procedures.
Read more
Image: Blood vessels and nerve tracts of a mouse; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

SWIR Imaging: The Power of Multi-Color Real-Time Technology

02.08.2021

Image-guided surgery is based on medical imaging. However, past imaging technologies performed while the patient is awake cannot deliver a complete view that facilitates a visual differentiation of structures such as blood vessels and nerve tracts. In a study, scientists developed a non-invasive imaging modality that enables multiplexing, deep tissue penetration, and real-time resolution.
Read more
Image: Four men next to a CT - Peter Brotchie, Dr. Ruwan Tennakoon, Prof. John Thangarajah, Dr. Mark Page; Copyright: St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

New AI tech for early detection of prostate cancer

16.07.2021

Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer and a leading cause of death by cancer in Australian men. Early detection is key to successful treatment, but men often dodge the doctor, avoiding diagnosis tests until it is too late.
Read more
Image: An emergency physician is measuring the blood pressure of an injured boy on a stretcher; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Emergency medicine: point-of-care diagnostic at the deployment site

01.06.2021

The sooner diagnosis can be made during an emergency, the faster the patient receives help. While most diagnostics still take place at the hospital, emergency physicians use more and more mobile devices directly at the deployment site. This is how they can save precious time. We take a look at some point-of-care applications in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: Close-up of an ultrasound head in the gloved hand of a physician; Copyright: PantherMedia/Bork

Faster treatment thanks to point-of-care diagnostics – in emergencies and beyond

01.06.2021

Making an informed and immediate treatment decision near or at the patient’s bedside – point-of-care testing (also known as POCT) makes this possible. Unlike stationary devices, special exam rooms or other service infrastructure, POC diagnostic devices offer a multitude of benefits including more flexibility, faster results, and lower costs.
Read more
Image: Ophthalmology diagnostic device; Copyright: Heidelberg Engineering GmbH

Heidelberg Engineering GmbH

Cooperative Support for Diagnosis and Therapy in Ophthalmology

06.05.2021

Today’s imaging technologies in ophthalmology are so advanced that retinal and vascular structures in the eye can be resolved with unprecedented precision in 2, 3 and even 4 dimensions. However, interpreting the image material for a therapy decision is a complex task that requires a lot of experience. Treatment errors may have severe consequences for patients.
Read more
Image: A hand is touching a three-dimensional rendering of a human skull with blood vessel; Copyright: Brainlab

Surgical planning with immersive mixed reality

01.04.2021

The job of surgeons starts long before they step into the operating room. They must use two-dimensional MRI or CT scans to plan the surgical steps on a three-dimensional patient, relying on their experience, skill, and spatial sense. Using mixed reality (MR) to view human anatomical models allows for better visualization and navigation.
Read more
Image: A physician in scrubs is putting on a Virtual Reality headset; Copyright: PantherMedia/Gorodenkoff

Broader perspective: how Mixed and Virtual Reality transform surgery

01.04.2021

For surgeons, nothing is more important than intimate knowledge and a spatial understanding of their operating field. Yet even three-dimensional imaging methods only provide limited assistance because the data is viewed on two-dimensional screens. When it comes to surgical planning or medical education, Mixed and Virtual Reality foster a better spatial understanding of the human body.
Read more
Image: Two surgeons with Virtual Reality headsets look at a floating model of a human heart; Copyright: PantherMedia/Gorodenkoff

Surgery in 3D: Virtual Reality in the OR

01.04.2021

Surgeons do not only have to gather theoretical knowledge and practice to perform successful interventions. They also need a good visual thinking and have to know the anatomical characteristics of each individual patient. Some of these tasks will become easier when Virtual and Mixed Reality bring three-dimensional, digital models into their profession.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Digital twin heart – Computer model for an optimized therapy success

15.03.2021

Heart surgery is difficult even for experienced surgeons and therapeutical success is not always certain. Physicians need to rely on their experience when choosing and planning the correct intervention. A computer model could help them in the future: The digital twin heart could be fed with patient data and then simulate whether an intervention will be successful.
Read more
Image: medical symbols around the earth in the hands of a person; Copyright: PantherMedia/everythingposs

PantherMedia/everythingposs

Israeli medical devices showcase digital innovations at MEDICA

24.08.2020

For the annual MEDICA trade fair, companies from all over the world assemble in Düsseldorf. The Israel Export Institute has been a part of it for the last couple of years. They present medical devices and digital innovations from different Israeli companies at their joint booth.
Read more
Image: Application of AR sonography; Copyright: Fraunhofer IGD

Fraunhofer IGD

Augmented reality ultrasound: putting the focus on patients

10.08.2020

This is how a conventional ultrasound scan works: patients lie down on a table next to the ultrasound machine. A doctor uses a probe to scan the part of the body in question, while he or she looks at the pictures on a monitor. In other words, the physician either focuses on his/her hand on the patient or the monitor. The Fraunhofer IGD wants to change this process as part of the "sonAR" project.
Read more
Image: Female physician is looking a CT images of the brain next to a patient in an ICU bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

Comprehensive stroke care: faster, closer, better

02.06.2020

"Time is brain!" – a fundamental rule in stroke care because time is of the essence when brain regions are undersupplied with oxygen and glucose. If circulation is not restored quickly, brain damage can be permanent. However, the key point here is not just to "be fast", but also to "use the time to treat stroke effectively".
Read more
Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02.06.2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
Read more
Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02.06.2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
Read more
Image: young woman makes an ultrasound with the new system and shows patient the image on her smartphone; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Ultrasound to go: versatile partner on hospital rounds

08.04.2020

The University Hospital Bonn has recently introduced an ultrasound device that's small enough to fit in your coat pocket. It's ready to use once you have connected it to a tablet or smartphone. The portable system makes bedside physical exams possible. The device primarily benefits students as it allows them to combine basic knowledge and clinical application.
Read more
Image: A device with a large monitor and different control panels in a darkened laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Cardiovascular diseases: using AI to navigate the catheter

09.03.2020

Treatment of a heart attack or stroke caused by vascular occlusion must be prompt to prevent further damage to vital tissue. Unfortunately, the actual treatment is often preceded by a lengthy catheter-based procedure where the cardiologist manually guides the catheter to the affected vessel. AI might perform this task in the future.
Read more
Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22.01.2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

AI in the hospital – Possibilities and limits

17.01.2020

A hospital generates several thousands of gigabytes of data each day. The growing flood of data is no longer manageable for doctors. The great hope: artificial intelligence. Radiology is the main beneficiary. Dr. Felix Nensa from Essen University Hospital and Dr. Peter Langkafel from the Digital Health Factory tell us more about the possibilities and limits of learning machines.
Read more
Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
Read more
Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
Read more
Image: Digital twin of the lungs; Copyright: Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

ARDS: Testing Consequences without Consequence

14.11.2019

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening illness in which the lungs are severely damaged. The condition always requires intensive medical care through mechanical ventilation. But not all lungs are the same. To ensure a personalized treatment that is adapted to the individual patient’s lung volume and condition, Ebenbuild relies on digital twins.
Read more
Image: A physician is standing in front of a floating image of the brain and is touching one point; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Igor Vetushko

Medicine 5.0: machine learning algorithms in healthcare

04.11.2019

Artificial intelligence holds the promise of salvation when it comes to medicine: it is meant to unburden medical professionals, save time and money and perform tasks reliably and tirelessly. But before AI algorithms are allowed to diagnose diseases, many technical and ethical questions still need answers.
Read more
Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04.11.2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
Read more
Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01.10.2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
Read more
Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
Read more
Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
Read more
Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
Read more
Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
Read more
Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22.08.2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
Read more
Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08.08.2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
Read more
Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22.07.2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
Read more
Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11.06.2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
Read more
Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23.04.2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
Read more
Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08.04.2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
Read more
Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
Read more
Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
Read more
Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
Read more
Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01.04.2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
Read more
Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Endoprostheses - Ultrasound to detect loosening?

27.02.2019

Many patients suffering from arthrosis or other kinds of damage in the hip joint need an endoprosthesis at some point. However, this prosthesis can loosen again after some time, so that it must be replaced. In order to delay this replacement surgery for as long as possible, the TH Mittelhessen University of Applied Sciences develops a new diagnostic method.
Read more
Photo: Preview picture of video

Where imaging and radiation meet – Radiotherapy with the MR-Linac

13.02.2019

In conventional radiotherapy, the tumor is first localized using CT and MRT images in order to calculate the irradiated areas. The major drawback in this case: the subsequent radiation only shows bone structures in the body but not the tumor itself. As a result, the radiated area is often larger than necessary. In our video you will learn how the MR-Linac can be used for more precise radiotherapy.
Read more