Evaluating brain tumours with artificial intelligence
Menu

Image: Elderly man with glasses and light green top holds his hand to his aching neck

Neurostimulation: Inceptiv™ fighting chronic neuropathic pain

19.04.2024

Neurostimulators play an important role in the treatment of chronic pain conditions. They use targeted electrical impulses to modulate pain signals. The Inceptiv™ neurostimulator from Medtronic is an example of a treatment solution for chronic neuropathic pain. It can offer sufferers a significant improvement in their quality of life.
Read more
Image: This image shows the electrodes of the CI cap which is put on a patient´s head. Three hands are coating the electrodes with contact gel; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

Better diagnostics for enhanced hearing with cochlear implants

23.02.2024

A research team from Hannover Medical School (MHH) and the University of Oldenburg is delving into the intricate processes of how the human brain adapts to electrical hearing through cochlear implants (CIs). The study, part of the Hearing4all Cluster of Excellence, aims to shed light on the diverse mechanisms influencing speech comprehension among CI users.
Read more
Image: The image shows the wireless yellow patch; Copyright: Bai Lab, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bai Lab, UNC-Chapel Hill

Wireless drug patch: advancing chronic disease treatment

20.02.2024

Advancements in drug delivery technology are paving the way for innovative treatment methods for chronic diseases. A recent breakthrough at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill introduces the Spatiotemporal On-Demand Patch (SOP), a wireless drug delivery system that could revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and neurological injuries.
Read more
Image: Patient using TRICEPS device during stroke rehabilitation; Copyright: TRICEPS BBC Look North

TRICEPS BBC Look North

Portable device to improve post-stroke arm recovery

14.02.2024

A new stroke treatment using a portable, pacemaker-like device that delivers electrical pulses to the brain during rehabilitation therapy is set to undergo trials to enhance arm recovery following a stroke.
Read more
Image: Two people talking about a brain tomography image

University of Birmingham develops diagnostic for traumatic brain injury

05.02.2024

Researchers at the University of Birmingham have unveiled an innovative diagnostic device for the rapid detection of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This groundbreaking technology employs a safe laser directed into the eye, offering a distinct approach to diagnosing TBI.
Read more
Image: Close-up: A doctor looks at a brain scan; Copyright: XiXinXing

XiXinXing

Evaluating brain tumours with artificial intelligence

22.12.2023

One application area of artificial intelligence (AI) is in medicine, especially in medical diagnostics. For instance, scans can be analysed automatically with the help of algorithms. An international and interdisciplinary team led by researchers from TU Darmstadt recently investigated whether AI can better evaluate images of brain tumours.
Read more
Image: Dr Tabea Seeliger and Professor Dr Thomas Skripuletz: Utensils for taking tear and saliva samples; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

MS and Sjögren's: the same and yet different

13.12.2023

MHH project investigates differences in neurological symptoms between multiple sclerosis and the rare Sjögren's syndrome.
Read more
Image: An older man and his granddaughter look at a photo album together on a couch; Copyright: bialasiewicz

bialasiewicz

Parkinson's: New hope when treatment options seem exhausted

20.11.2023

As Parkinson's disease progresses, more invasive therapies are used that require brain surgery, for example. When these no longer deliver the desired results, physicians often conclude that treatment options are exhausted.
Read more
Image: Young girl does movement exercises with a tension band; Copyright: University of Jyväskylä

University of Jyväskylä

Cerebral Palsy: multicomponent exercise improves physical functioning in children and young adults

13.10.2023

A new study carried out at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, found that an individually tailored exercise program improves motor function, muscle strength and joint mobility in children and young adults with CP.
Read more
Image: Man with dark hair, glasses and a checked shirt smiles into the camera against a gray and white background; Copyright: Peer Erfle/IMT

Peer Erfle/IMT

Microchips: better understand diseases like schizophrenia

15.09.2023

The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the recipients of its prestigious Starting Grants. Among them is a researcher from the Technical University of Braunschweig: Dr. Thomas Winkler will receive €1.5 million for his research on modular organ-on-chip technology to better understand neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.
Read more
Image: Ultrasound technology is used in the transcranial ultrasound stimulation laboratory by a woman and a man on a female patient; Copyright: University of Plymouth

University of Plymouth

Targeted ultrasound can change brain functions for up to an hour

13.09.2023

A study published in Nature Communications suggests transcranial ultrasound stimulation can be used in a targeted way to change specific types of activity within the brain for up to an hour after intervention.
Read more
Image: Close up of yellow electrodes; Copyright: drazenphoto

drazenphoto

Electrotherapy without surgery is possible

28.08.2023

Researchers at Lund University and Gothenburg University have successfully developed temporary, organic electrodes that can be seamlessly integrated into biological systems.
Read more
Image: Diagram of a brain, with brain areas marked in colour; Copyright: MPI CBS

MPI CBS

The anatomy of memory: new mnemomic networks discovered in the brain

21.08.2023

Using a novel approach of precision neuroimaging and high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), neuroscientists and physicists at MPI CBS in Leipzig (Germany) and anatomist Menno Witter from the Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience in Trondheim (Norway) have now ventured into the depths of the human memory system.
Read more
Image: Young men in a rugby game situation; Copyright: YuriArcursPeopleimages

YuriArcursPeopleimages

New concussion headset shows when it's safe to return to play

18.08.2023

A new digital headset designed to measure alterations in brain function could change decisions about how quickly an athlete is ready to return to play after a concussion.
Read more
Image: Immune cells in blue and vessels in pink in the bone marrow of the skull; Copyright: Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

Cell Press | ©Kolabas et al.

A new ally in fighting brain diseases: our very own skull

16.08.2023

Alzheimer's, stroke, multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases cause severe damage due to neuroinflammation mediated by immune cells.
Read more
Image: Two men looking into the camera, one holding a cable and the other a circuit board ; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

REM sleep study: new ways of early Parkinson's therapy

15.08.2023

Disturbed dream sleep may indicate later Parkinson's disease. Researchers at MHH Neurology are now investigating the preliminary phase of the neurodegenerative disease and are offering places for study participants.
Read more
Image: A child with a cap on his head which is supposed to stimulate the brain; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

Children with ADHD: non-invasive brain stimulation can ease symptoms

11.08.2023

Non-invasive brain stimulation, combined with cognitive training, could significantly improve symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to new research jointly led by the University of Surrey and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Read more
Image: An older woman in a plaid blouse looks thoughtfully out of the window; Copyright: Lancaster University

Lancaster University

Neurology: researchers identify changes in ageing brain using novel techniques

04.08.2023

Researchers investigating brain activity in older people say the coordination between neuronal activity and the brain’s oxygenation is altered.
Read more
Image: Screen of a smartphone with a medication analysis for epileptics; Copyright: Universitat Politècnica de València

Universitat Politècnica de València

Epileptika: app to help treatment of epilepsy in people with intellectual disability

02.08.2023

A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) has participated in the development of Epileptika. This application aims to help the treatment of refractory epilepsy in people with intellectual disability.
Read more
Image: Physiotherapy in the upper back with TENS electrode pads, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Electrodes: 4D printing for nerve stimulation

25.07.2023

Specific nerves may be stimulated artificially, for example to treat pain. The finer the nerves, the more difficult it is to attach the required electrodes. Researchers have now developed flexible electrodes produced with 4D printing technology. On contact with moisture, they automatically fold and wrap themselves around thin nerves.
Read more
Image: Jahanian Najafabadi at Constructor University, poses for the camera in a dark blue suit; Copyright: Constructor University

Constructor University

Virtual reality: healthy aging with virtual aids

19.07.2023

Can elderly people really learn how to use new technologies and adapt themselves in learning new tools? The answer, according to researcher Dr. Amir Jahanian Najafabadi and colleagues at Constructor University in Bremen, is yes.
Read more
Image: Woman hands holding human brain over green wheat field; Copyright: Masson-Simon

Masson-Simon

Brain: a varied life boosts functional networks

18.07.2023

The findings in mice provide unprecedented insights into the complexity of large-scale neural networks and brain plasticity. Moreover, they could pave the way for new brain-inspired artificial intelligence methods.
Read more
Image: Doctor performs an EEG examination on a woman; Copyright: diego_cervo

diego_cervo

Brain stimulation: using electricity to treat depression

17.07.2023

The Center for Responsible Research and Innovation (CeRRi) within the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering IAO, working with the University of Ottawa in Canada, the National Paraplegic Hospital in Toledo, Spain and the University Medical Center Göttingen in Germany, has developed recommended actions for implementing technological solutions to treat mental illnesses.
Read more
Image: Images of complex brain structures. On the left these structures are difficult to see, on the right they are shown more clearly; Copyright: Johann Danzl

Johann Danzl

Brain: LIONESS enables insights into complex tissue

13.07.2023

In a new paper, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (ISTA) has come together to present a new way to observe the brain’s structure and dynamics – in a high resolution and without damaging the tissue.
Read more
Image: Close-up of a female eye in purple-blue futuristic design concept; Copyright: lassedesignen/Shutterstock

lassedesignen/Shutterstock

Multiple sclerosis: new biomarker for early diagnosis

12.07.2023

A study conducted by researchers from the Department of Neurology at MedUni Vienna and University Hospital Vienna has demonstrated for the first time that diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be significantly improved by additionally measuring the thickness of retinal layers in the eye.
Read more
Image: Cross-sectional electron micrographs of individual nerve fibers in MS brain biopsies; Axons sheathed with myelin showing increasingly damage ; Copyright: Leipzig University

Leipzig University

Multiple sclerosis: Myelin may be detrimental to nerve fibres

05.07.2023

Researchers at Leipzig University and Max Planck Institute for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have discovered that myelin, which was previously thought to be solely protective, can actually threaten the survival of the axons.
Read more
Image: European Union flags in front of the Berlaymont building, headquarters of the European Commission in Brussels; Copyright: Dmitry_Rukhlenko

Dmitry_Rukhlenko

ETERNITY: EU graduate training on metabolism and neurodegeneration

04.07.2023

In a new, EU funded program, early career scientists are tracking down the connection between metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. DZNE is involved in a leading role.
Read more
Image: Depiction of a brain and the nerve connections that run down the spinal cord; Copyright: joaquincorbalan

joaquincorbalan

Fiber-based endo-microscope: understanding neuronal communication

28.06.2023

A new hair-thin endo-microscope, developed by an international team with the participation of Leibniz IPHT, promises extremely gentle in-depth observations.
Read more
Image: Man with short brown hair, glasses and a blue shirt, Prof. Thomas Klockgether, smiles at the camera; Copyright: University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

University Hospital of Bonn (UKB)

Ataxias: international award for Bonn patient care and research

28.06.2023

The Ataxia Center at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and DZNE have been awarded the title “Ataxia Center of Excellence” by the US National Ataxia Foundation (NAF) for their patient care and research – as the only organization in Europe.
Read more
Image: Fluorine-18-labelled folate PET/CT 3D fusion image of a rat subject with a glioma visible in the central region of the brain; Copyright: Maxwell Miner

Maxwell Miner

PET imaging: discovery can help detect brain tumours

22.06.2023

Folate-based radiopharmaceuticals can be used in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to detect folate receptors in brain tumours. The discovery of folate receptors and their exploitation potential with respect to brain tumours is a new and significant finding in the field.
Read more
Image: Graphic of a human with brain and spine, neural connections into one hand, a neuron that is stimulated by a field; Copyright: HZDR/Sahneweiß

HZDR/Sahneweiß

Magnetic stimulation: potential therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases

19.06.2023

Motor neurons in healthy individuals send signals to the skeletal muscles. ALS, however, is currently an incurable, neurodegenerative disease in which motor neurons are severely damaged and can therefore no longer transmit these signals. An interdisciplinary team at HZDR has proven in cell experiments that magnetic fields can restore impaired motor neurons.
Read more
Image: Colored image of cortical tissue; Copyright: Universidad de Barcelona

Universidad de Barcelona

MRI shows new altered neural circuits in Huntington's disease

16.06.2023

Huntington’s disease is a genetically-based neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor, cognitive and psychiatric disorders in the affected individuals. Understanding the alterations in the neural circuits in this disorder is essential in order to design therapeutic approaches.
Read more
Image: Micrograph: Certain immune cells called microglia (yellow) remove amyloid plaques (magenta) in the brain of an Alzheimer's mouse; Copyright: MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

MPI für Multidisziplinäre Naturwissenschaften

Dementia: poorly insulated nerve cells promote Alzheimer's disease in old age

08.06.2023

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Multidisciplinary Sciences in Göttingen have shown that defective myelin actively promotes disease-related changes in Alzheimer’s. Slowing down age-related myelin damage could open up new ways to prevent the disease or delay its progression in the future.
Read more
Image: Using data from magnetic resonance imaging, the researchers were able to compare the brains of healthy and fibromyalgia sufferers; Copyright: Benjamin Mosch

Benjamin Mosch

Imaging: MRI shows how fibromyalgia changes the brain

05.06.2023

A team from the LWL Clinic for Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, has investigated the brain changes that are related to the disorder.
Read more
Image: A doctor conducts MRI diagnostics of the brain on the computer in a modern clinic; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

AI tool for MRI may spot brain damage in college athletes

02.06.2023

An artificial intelligence computer program that processes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can accurately identify changes in brain structure that result from repeated head injury, a new study in student athletes shows.
Read more
Image: Two women, Wiebke Möbius and Sophie Hümmert, at a white electron microscope; Copyright: Swen Pförtner MPI

Swen Pförtner MPI

Multiple Sclerosis: structural changes in brain tissue promote inflammatory processes

31.05.2023

A German-Dutch research team has shown that ultrastructural changes in healthy areas in the white matter of MS patients make the tissue more susceptible to inflammation and the formation of lesions
Read more
Image: Several tubes of blood in a laboratory for a blood test; Copyright: mirarahneva

mirarahneva

Neurosurgery: blood tests can show impact on the brain

31.05.2023

Damage to the brains of patients operated on for brain tumors may be assessed by measuring biomarkers in the blood pre- and postoperatively. A new study by University of Gothenburg researchers shows that the increase in markers tallies well with the impairment caused by insufficient blood flow.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Exoskeletons for everyday use: Non-invasive method for controlling prostheses

26.05.2023

Modern prostheses are already smart, but they still have their limits. The Assistive Intelligent Robotics Lab at FAU is therefore also researching an intuitive and non-invasive method for controlling prostheses. In our interview, those involved tell us exactly what they are working on together with neurologists and surgeons from the Erlangen University Hospital.
Read more
Image: The carrier of the ARM2U team, Kyle Briggs, competing with the prosthesis at a Cybathlon 2023 event; Copyright: BarcelonaTech (UPC)

BarcelonaTech (UPC)

Low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses

25.05.2023

A low-cost robotic arm created by students as an alternative to conventional prostheses: The ARM2u biomedical engineering team, from the UPC’s Barcelona School of Industrial Engineering (ETSEIB), is working on new functions for their low-cost 3D-printed transradial prosthesis.
Read more
Image: Bunte Fotokollage in Hexagonform mit Beispielbildern von einer Entnahme von Biosignalen; Copyright: Fraunhofer IDMT

Fraunhofer IDMT

EEG as an example of data protection for biosignals

16.05.2023

The “NEMO” project is exploring anonymisation techniques, using the example of electroencephalograms (EEG).
Read more
Image: A transparent miniaturized muscle implant lies on a black table; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Fraunhofer IBMT

Human-machine interface stops muscle tremors

10.05.2023

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT have been working with international partners to develop a technology platform to help relieve the symptoms of muscle tremors.
Read more
Image: Close-up of doctor pointing at human pelvic skeleton model in medical clinic.; Copyright: Okrasyuk

Okrasyuk

Map of spinal cord formation gives new knowledge on diseases of the nervous system

03.05.2023

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have mapped how cells in the human spinal cord are formed in the embryo and what genes control the process.
Read more
Image: A spoon piled with bits of plastic. The spoon lies on a salmon-colored background; Copyright: xalien/Shutterstock

xalien/Shutterstock

Tiny plastic particles also find their way into the brain

28.04.2023

With the help of computer models, researchers have discovered that a specific surface structure (biomolecular corona) is crucial for the passage of plastic particles into the brain.
Read more
Image: Bochum research team: Burkhard Pleger (left) and Timo Dreier pose for the camera in white coats; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

RUB, Marquard

Effects of brain stimulation amenable to conditioning

28.04.2023

Researchers at Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, have successfully implemented a special form of classical conditioning. They showed on a group of 75 people that effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be triggered solely by listening to a tone.
Read more
Image: A doctor does an EEG scan on a patient; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Computer-assisted procedure classifies Ataxia-related speech disturbances

25.04.2023

Researchers at DZNE and the University Hospital Bonn, together with the Berlin-based company PeakProfiling GmbH, have developed a computer-assisted method that recognizes the severity of speech disturbances resulting from ataxia, a brain disease, with great accuracy.
Read more
Image: ARC trial participant in active therapy: ARC Therapy is designed to deliver targeted, programmed spinal cord stimulation; Copyright: ONWARD Medical NV

ONWARD Medical NV

Kick-off: new Marie Skłodowska-Curie Doctoral Network "ReWIRE"

05.04.2023

Through ReWIRE, next-generation scientists will be trained to develop translational breakthrough therapeutic solutions for patients with paralysis caused by traumatic spinal cord injuries.
Read more
Image: Someone playing a memory game on the smartphone; Copyright: beta-web | memodio GmbH

beta-web

Dementia prevention with memodio – app helps fend off memory loss

03.04.2023

Globally, 55 million persons are effected by dementia. The neurodegenerative disease is a chronic condition. Once the decline in brain function has started, it is difficult to stop it, thus underscoring the importance of prevention. This is where memodio comes into play. The app is designed to help people with cognitive training and prevent dementia.
Read more
Image: Man with long brown hair and glasses, Viktor Jirsa, smiles at the camera; Copyright: private

private

Advances in brain modelling open path to digital twins for brain medicine

30.03.2023

In the current edition of The Lancet Neurology, researchers of the Human Brain Project (HBP) present the novel clinical uses of advanced brain modelling methods. Computational brain modelling techniques that integrate the measured data of a patient have been developed by researchers at AMU Marseille as part of the HBP.
Read more
Image: Female doctor with purple ribbon, sign of Alzheimer's disease, pancreatic cancer, epilepsy, lupus day; Copyright: chormail

chormail

Solution to classify epileptic syndromes in near real-time

21.03.2023

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), close to 50 million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy, a chronic neurological disease, whose seizures are considered one of the main symptoms.
Read more
Image: Blood test tube for laboratory on white background; Copyright: grafvision

grafvision

Epilepsy could become easier to pinpoint with blood test

17.03.2023

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have discovered higher levels of immune proteins in the blood before and after an epileptic seizure.
Read more
Image: A man in a blue shirt, Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth, standing next to a wall and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Bielefeld University/Sarah Jonek

Predicting outbreak of ALS disease with AI methods

08.03.2023

Using artificial intelligence (AI) methods, researchers led by Professor Dr Alexander Schönhuth from Bielefeld University’s Faculty of Technology have succeeded in recording and deciphering the genotype profiles of 3,000 ALS patients and thus learning more about the development of the disease.
Read more
Image: Balance exercises outdoors. Mature woman standing on one leg exercising balance; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Poor balance may indicate changes in brain volume

06.03.2023

In a study recently published in Gait & Posture, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed that the volume of the hippocampus is correlated with a measure of balance ability in healthy older people.
Read more
Image: Pipette adding sample to stem cell cultures growing in pots for stem cell implantation; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Electrodes grown in the brain – paving the way for future therapies for neurological disorders

02.03.2023

The boundaries between biology and technology are becoming blurred. Researchers at Linköping, Lund, and Gothenburg universities in Sweden have successfully grown electrodes in living tissue using the body’s molecules as triggers. The result, published in the journal Science, paves the way for the formation of fully integrated electronic circuits in living organisms.
Read more
Image: A man in fine striped shirt with glasses, Prof. Dr. med. Tobias Moser, smiles at the camera; Copyright: MBExC/spförtner

MBExC/spförtner

Optical cochlea implant: ERC Proof of Concept Grant for Tobias Moser

02.03.2023

In the ImageTox project, the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the CISPA Helmholtz Center for Information Security are pooling their expertise in the fields of drug discovery and artificial intelligence (AI).
Read more
Image: old man falls to the ground and touches his forehead; Copyright: LightFieldStudios

LightFieldStudios

Balance ability predicts cognitive impairment

28.02.2023

In a study recently published in BMC Geriatrics, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed a new measure of physical balance that could help to identify individuals who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD).
Read more
Image: Nose surgery performed on a woman; Copyright: GabiStock

GabiStock

ENT surgery – Interventions for speech and hearing

27.02.2023

Speaking and hearing are the two most important abilities that connect humans to their environment. If they get limited through disease or injury, it is all the more important to restore them as broadly as possible. Depending on the cause for their limitation, there are different surgical treatment possibilities. We take a look at current methods in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: Noninvasive intracranial pressure meter fixed to a man's head; Copyright: EPO

EPO

Low brain pressure could be a risk factor for developing glaucoma

20.02.2023

An international team of researchers led by Lithuanian scientists provide additional evidence that intracranial pressure plays an important role in normal-tension glaucoma, which accounts for up to 50 per cent of all glaucoma cases.
Read more
Image: A multiwell plate is filled with a liquid. A brain scan is visible under the plate; Copyright: Image-Source

Image-Source

Predicting dementia using neural network characteristics

13.02.2023

In many neurodegenerative conditions, brain changes occur before symptoms emerge. But now, researchers from Japan have found a new way to distinguish these conditions in the early stages according to changes in brain activity patterns.
Read more
Image: A man in a green shirt and brown pants is lying on a chair with electrodes attached to his head; Copyright: Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Wake Forest University School of Medicine

Non-invasive technology reduces symptoms of insomnia, improves autonomic nervous system function

09.02.2023

A new study from researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine shows significant improvements in not only sleep quality, but also in improved autonomic nervous system function using a closed-loop, acoustic stimulation neurotechnology.
Read more
Image: Chung-Hao Lee, Ph.D., at the University of Oklahoma, smiles at the camera in a business suit; Copyright: University of Oklahoma

University of Oklahoma

Researchers designing device to improve brain aneurysm treatment

03.02.2023

Under the direction of Chung-Hao Lee, Ph.D., at the University of Oklahoma, a five-year research project will lead to the design of a device that can be customized to better treat unique aneurysms, the irregular bulge in a blood vessel that can be deadly.
Read more
Image: Patient testing a brain-computer interface developed by Charité to control an exoskeleton hand; Copyright: AG Klinische Neurotechnologie, Charité Berlin

AG Klinische Neurotechnologie, Charité Berlin

Controlling neural exoskeletons more precisely with diamond sensors

02.02.2023

In the recently launched NeuroQ lighthouse project, the project partners develop highly sensitive diamond-based quantum sensors that will enable paralyzed people to control neural exoskeletons more precisely.
Read more
Image: A woman in a white coat, Julie Pilitsis, stands in a medical laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Study unravels interplay between sleep, chronic pain and spinal cord stimulation

02.02.2023

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine, in collaboration with Albany Medical Center, conducted a study to better understand the effect of spinal cord stimulation on chronic pain and sleep.
Read more
Image: Prof. Dr. Aldo Faisal smiles at the camera in an institute building; Copyright: privat.

private

Smart clothing and Artificial Intelligence: Diagnosis and monitoring of neurological diseases

01.02.2023

International research groups led by Prof. Dr. Aldo Faisal, Professor of Digital Health at the University of Bayreuth, have developed a novel set of tools for diagnosing and monitoring neurological diseases based on body-worn sensors (wearables) and artificial intelligence.
Read more
Image: Dr Rytis Maskeliūnas poses smiling in front of the camera, Copyright: Kaunas University of Technology (KTU)

Kaunas University of Technology (KTU)

Altered speech may be the first sign of Parkinson’s disease

31.01.2023

Lithuanian researcher from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Rytis Maskeliūnas, together with colleagues from the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU), tried to identify early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease using voice data.
Read more
Image: A physiotherapist is doing a leg exercise with a woman who is wearing an orthosis; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Muscles and nervous system: Space research helps combat degeneration

30.01.2023

Injuries do not just happen to athletes: along with surgeries, they are often the reason for prolonged bed rest. Meanwhile, extended physical inactivity can trigger changes in muscles and the nervous system. Sports medicine wants to counteract these negative effects and use insights from space research in the future.
Read more
Image: X-ray of the hip with a hip fracture; Copyright: Booyabazooka

Booyabazooka

Mechanical stimulation could be used to prevent falls and strengthen muscles

24.01.2023

Mechanical vibrations could help improve our muscles and our balance control, according to research at Aston University. Researchers in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences have examined the effect of stimulation on muscle spindles which ‘speak’ to the central nervous system to help keep us upright and walk straight.
Read more
Image: Close up of female scientist in white uniform holding microtiter plate while working in laboratory, Copyright: gstockstudio

gstockstudio

New blood test differentiates neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease from other dementias

23.01.2023

A new blood test that can track and follow the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease – and exclude other dementias.
Read more
Image: The word

margaritaylita

AI detects rare forms of dementia

20.01.2023

Researchers at MPI CBS and University of Leipzig Medical Center have used new artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning techniques to detect rare forms of dementia on MRI images.
Read more
Image: Two men in white coats are standing at a microscope in the laboratory; Copyright: National University of Singapore

National University of Singapore

Scientists identify blood biomarker for cognitive impairment and dementia

02.01.2023

A recent study by a team comprising researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the National University Health System (NUHS) revealed that low levels of ergothioneine (ET) in blood plasma may predict an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, suggesting possible therapeutic or early screening measures for cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly.
Read more
Image: scanning electron microscope image of red blood cells in the blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized treatment of acute stroke: diagnostics with 3D virtual histology

23.08.2022

Every minute counts when someone is having an acute stroke. If the cause is a vascular blockage caused by a blood clot (thrombus) in the brain, detailed insights into the thrombus composition is critical to remove or dissolve it successfully and help restore blood flow. But that’s often easier said than done when "time is brain".
Read more
Image: A woman with glasses and white hair is solving some tasks on a sheet of paper; Copyright: PantherMedia/microgen

PantherMedia/happysuthida

Dementia: "We want to achieve earlier diagnosis for more people"

29.03.2022

As we get older, we tend to become more forgetful, sometimes strange or even confused and overwhelmed by everyday life. But is it always just the age? With an increasing lifespan, the possibility to suffer from a cognitive disease at one point is also increasing. The majority of cognitive diseases is never diagnosed.
Read more
Image: Cartoon for the Konectom App; Copyright: Phil Hubbe/ZKN

Phil Hubbe/ZKN

Konectom: App supports self-management of Multiple Sclerosis

08.02.2022

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous systems that requires regular checkups with the neurologist every three months. However, an exacerbation of MS, also known as a flare-up, can occur between these appointments. The Konectom smartphone app aims to close this diagnostic gap.
Read more
Image: Illustration of the way an optical Cochlear implant functions; Copyright: UMG

UMG

Cochlear implants: Using light to improve hearing

01.12.2021

Cochlear implants are devices that partially restore hearing in wearers. Unfortunately, the signal transmission from the implant to the auditory nerve is still rather basic, thus limiting the sound quality. Future implants could be more accurate in this setting by using light versus electrical pulses to stimulate nerve cells in the ear.
Read more
Image: A signal receiver and a transmitter of a Cochlear implant on the palm of a person; Copyright: PantherMedia/npudov

PantherMedia/npudov

Implants: When technology makes sense – quite literally

01.12.2021

Disease, injury, or a condition you were born with – reasons why some people must live without one or several of their five senses. Fortunately, there are many modern sensory aids that help replace one sense with another, which is especially the case when it comes to vision and hearing. Given technology's advancements, can artificial or biological implants someday soon be a viable alternative?
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Deep Brain Stimulation – Measuring electrodes against Parkinson's disease

23.08.2021

We cannot heal Parkinson’s disease yet, all we can do is alleviate the symptoms. One possibility to do this are implantable electrodes that stimulate part of the brain and counteract the characteristic tremor. In our video, Prof. Cordula Matthies and Prof. Jens Volkmann from the University Hospital Würzburg explain how this stimulation can be targeted better with a new electrode generation.
Read more
Image: Participant trains in the Ekso GT during an inpatient gait training session; Copyright: Kessler Foundation

Kessler Foundation

High-dose gait training with robotic exoskeleton after acute stroke

09.08.2021

Preliminary findings by Kessler researchers show that the use of a robotic exoskeleton during inpatient rehabilitation for acute stroke may improve function. Gait training in the robotic exoskeleton can provide high-dose therapy soon after stroke, when it is likely to have its maximal effect on functional ambulation.
Read more
Image: A female physiotherapist is helping a woman during an exercise with a therapeutic rubber band; Copyright: PantherMedia/photographee.eu

PantherMedia/photographee.eu

Stroke rehabilitation: regaining arm movement with nerve stimulation

09.08.2021

Stroke rehabilitation exercises are essential to regain mobility and strength in the body. Each patient recovers lost skills and function differently. A recent study has now examined how vagus nerve stimulation with electrical impulses during stroke rehab could improve arm mobility.
Read more
Image: A sleeping woman; Copyright: PantherMedia/fizkes

PantherMedia/fizkes

Wearable EEG gathers reliable sleep data from the ear

16.06.2021

Preliminary results of a new study show that a wearable electroencephalogram device that gathers data from the ear measures sleep as reliably as traditional EEG electrodes attached to the scalp.
Read more
Image: A woman sitting in front of a device for an eye examination; Copyright: PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

PantherMedia/Med_Photo_Studio

Alzheimer's disease: early detection using an eye exam

22.03.2021

Alzheimer's disease is still incurable, but if detected early enough, countermeasures can improve treatment and slow the progression. Unfortunately, there is still no reliable early detection test at this juncture. This might soon change thanks to a non-invasive spectroscopy of the retina.
Read more
Image: a woman wearing a wearable EEG that looks like a headband; Copyright: Evercot AI GmbH

Evercot AI GmbH

Good connection: AI and EEG work hand in hand

17.02.2021

Artificial intelligences (AI) are able to help medical professionals detect diseases. This is based on medical data records from which the AI can draw conclusions about diseases. These conclusions are most accurate when the extraction of the data sets is directly linked to the processing.
Read more
Image: A modernly equiped OR; Copyright: Fredrick Johnson Joseph/Surgeons Lab

Fredrick Johnson Joseph/Surgeons Lab

4D-Simulator breakthrough in brain surgery

13.01.2021

Aneurysm operations in the brain rank among the most delicate procedures in neurosurgery. The highest demands are placed on surgeons when choosing the type of intervention, planning the route and carrying out extremely delicate procedures on the blood vessel.
Read more
Image: A young woman is wearing a flat device made from printed electronics on her forehead; Copyright: Universität Oldenburg/Abteilung Neuropsychologie

Universität Oldenburg/Abteilung Neuropsychologie

Wearable EEG: A comfortable way to record brain activity

09.11.2020

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test that is used in cognitive research or to diagnose conditions such as epilepsy and sleep disorders. EEG electrode caps are somewhat difficult to wear, which is why they are only used in laboratories. One viable alternative are measuring devices made of printed electronics. They are more comfortable to wear and allow users to continue their daily activities.
Read more
Image: Physician checks function of an arm prosthesis; Copyright: PantherMedia/belahoche

PantherMedia/belahoche

Bionic prosthesis: easy to put on, intuitive to use

22.09.2020

Patients who receive a prosthesis after the amputation of a limb often have to train for weeks or months until they can control the technology and use it in everyday life without problems. At the Medical University of Vienna, the world's first bionic prosthesis has now been developed that has a closed control loop and enables immediate, intuitive use.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Stroke therapy of the future: Stimulating entire networks

19.08.2020

The Neurological University Hospital in Tübingen is a world leader in research on TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation). In this report you will learn how the stroke therapy, which is always complemented by physiotherapeutic treatment, is being developed from a punctual to an entire network treatment in the brain.
Read more
Image: Nurse checking surveillance monitor at the bedside and writing down patient data on a clipboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/Kzenon

PantherMedia/Kzenon

Big Data: early warning system for the ICU

03.08.2020

Patient monitoring systems in the ICU sound up to 700 alarms on average per patient per day, which boils down to one alarm every two minutes. An excessive number of them are false alarms. This generates vast amounts of data, which can make it difficult for doctors and nurses to identify the most critical alarms to manage. It also has a negative effect on the treatment of intensive care patients.
Read more
Image: Female physician is looking a CT images of the brain next to a patient in an ICU bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

Comprehensive stroke care: faster, closer, better

02.06.2020

"Time is brain!" – a fundamental rule in stroke care because time is of the essence when brain regions are undersupplied with oxygen and glucose. If circulation is not restored quickly, brain damage can be permanent. However, the key point here is not just to "be fast", but also to "use the time to treat stroke effectively".
Read more
Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02.06.2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
Read more
Image: Man sitting next to an older woman wearing vr glasses on a couch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

Sensor-Based Smart Glove Enables Parkinson's Diagnosis

25.02.2020

Neurological disorders like Parkinson's are often diagnosed once the disease has already progressed to a later stage. The VAFES project was initiated to facilitate an early detection. Sensor technology and VR are used in the creation of a playful test system.
Read more
Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01.10.2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
Read more
Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
Read more
Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
Read more
Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
Read more
Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Sports medicine: Neuromuscular training for optimal performance

20.08.2019

Movement, strength and coordination - after injuries as well as in healthy athletes, these three components must be intact for movements to run smoothly. At the Beta Klinik in Bonn, Dr. Markus Klingenberg, a specialist in orthopaedics, trauma surgery and sports medicine, offers neuromuscular training with a playful character that can be adapted to the patient's needs.
Read more
Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
Read more
Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01.07.2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
Read more
Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11.06.2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
Read more
Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
Read more
Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03.06.2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
Read more
Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03.06.2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
Read more
Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03.06.2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
Read more
Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08.04.2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
Read more
Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01.04.2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
Read more
Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
Read more
Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
Read more
Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
Read more