Laboratory technology and diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine
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News from the editors of MEDICA-tradefair.com

Characterizing regulators of tissue inflammation
Although macrophages are classified as immune cells functioning in the activation and resolution of tissue inflammation, it is now clear that they are critically involved in a variety of disease processes, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, tumor growth and metastasis and tissue fibrosis.
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Analyses of genome data enables tracking of avian influenza viruses
An international consortium succeeded in tracking the genesis and spread of new reassortants of avian influenza viruses by the use of mathematical analyses. This large-scale international study has now been published in the scientific journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America).
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Blood test shows promise in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's
A new blood test demonstrated remarkable promise in discriminating between persons with and without Alzheimer's disease and in persons at known genetic risk may be able to detect the disease as early as 20 years before the onset of cognitive impairment, according to a large international study published in Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
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Lab profiles differentiate MIS-C from COVID-19 in children
Findings show that MIS-C is a post-infectious syndrome distinct from Kawasaki disease and may help guide treatment decisions.
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Researchers discover stem cells in optic nerve that preserve vision
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have for the first time identified stem cells in the region of the optic nerve, which transmits signals from the eye to the brain.
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Visualization of protein mobility in the synapse
Scientists in the Multiscale Bioimaging Cluster of Excellence have succeeded for the first time in simultaneously displaying the motion profiles of a large number of proteins in the synapse. Published in The EMBO Journal.
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New insights into wound healing
When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis.
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Biofilm early detection findings will advance chronic wound care
Biofilms, microscopic entities not visible by the naked eye, go undetected by health professionals damaging healing tissue and causing delays in wound healing by reducing the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotic, antimicrobial and host immune treatments.
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Sars-Cov-2: rapid test for the determination of antibodies
To determine immunity to Sars-Cov-2 and the effectiveness of potential vaccines, the amount of neutralising antibodies in the blood of recovered or vaccinated individuals must be determined. A traditional neutralisation test usually takes two to three days and must be carried out with infectious coronaviruses in a laboratory complying to biosafety level 3.
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Organoids: inflammation induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction
The scientists who developed the first 3D multicellular brain organoid with a functional blood brain barrier now report that the model could be a promising platform to screen drugs that could work to control inflammation, which is at the center of many neurological conditions, like ischemic stroke.
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Coronavirus: tracking symptoms with app an inexact predictor of infection
A new piece in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that tracking symptoms affiliated with the novel coronavirus through an app may not be a good predictor of the spread of the disease.
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Tissue imaging system accelerates cancer diagnosis
Cancer diagnosis requires a lengthy process of multiple analyses of tissue biopsies, impeding the quick and early detection of cancers. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University developed a novel imaging system that uses near-infrared light to be less invasive and more time efficient than the conventional approach.
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Novel diagnostic approaches for aggressive bone cancer
Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common form of aggressive bone cancer. A MedUni Vienna study, led by geneticist Erwin Wagner, has uncovered new insights into the disease mechanisms of OS, paving the way for potential new diagnostic and treatment strategies for fighting the bone disease. The study has just been published in the high impact journal Cell Research.
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Non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose infant urinary tract obstruction
One in every 500 babies is born with a condition called ureteropelvic junction obstruction, an obstruction of the ureter that prevents urine from flowing from one or both of the kidneys into the bladder. Diagnosed prenatally, UPJO can cause urinary tract infections; it can also result in chronic kidney disease and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in later life.
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Revealing lung disease with exhaled biomarkers
Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to monitor pneumonia or other lung diseases by analyzing the breath exhaled by the patient. In a study of mice, the researchers showed that they could use this system to monitor bacterial pneumonia, as well as a genetic disorder of the lungs called alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.
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Simple test aids in predicting and preventing falls
Scientists have developed a simple clinical test that can assess the lower limb strength of patients to predict their risk of falls. The “enhanced paper grip test” validated by researchers from the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies at Staffordshire University involves pulling a small card from underneath the participant’s foot while asking them to grip with their big toe.
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Collaborative platform to streamline brain metastasis research
Science is collaborative by nature, since scientific knowledge only advances, step by step, through combined efforts and findings. Nevertheless, there is often a lack of communication regarding the more technical and everyday advances in laboratory work, and as a result research progresses less quickly.
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Machine learning helps grow artificial organs
Researchers have developed a neural network capable of recognizing retinal tissues during the process of their differentiation in a dish. Unlike humans, the algorithm achieves this without the need to modify cells, making the method suitable for growing retinal tissue for developing cell replacement therapies to treat blindness and conducting research into new drugs.
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Software to find drug-resistant bacteria
Washington State University researchers have developed an easy-to-use software program to identify drug-resistant genes in bacteria. The program could make it easier to identify the deadly antimicrobial resistant bacteria that exist in the environment. Such microbes annually cause more than 2.8 million difficult-to-treat pneumonia, bloodstream and other infections and 35,000 deaths in the U.S.
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Cell membrane on a chip to speed up screening of drug candidates for COVID-19
Researchers have developed a human cell 'membrane on a chip' that allows continuous monitoring of how drugs and infectious agents interact with our cells, and may soon be used to test potential drug candidates for COVID-19.
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Gentle technique to study heart tissue functioning
Biophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues have proposed a simple way to observe the heart tissue. Besides being relatively uncomplicated, the new method is cheaper and produces results that are more independent, compared with the analogues currently in use. The study came out in Annals of Biomedical Engineering.
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COVID-19: virus can infect heart cells in lab dish
A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can infect heart cells in a lab dish, indicating it may be possible for heart cells in COVID-19 patients to be directly infected by the virus. The discovery, published today in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, was made using heart muscle cells that were produced by stem cell technology.
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Organoids suggest COVID-19 virus can infect human brain cells
A multidisciplinary team from two Johns Hopkins University institutions, including neurotoxicologists and virologists from the Bloomberg School of Public Health and infectious disease specialists from the school of medicine, has found that organoids known as "mini-brains" can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.
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Portable COVID-19 diagnostic system for rapid on-site testing
COVID-19 screening can soon be conducted directly at various testing stations, and patients can get their test results in about an hour from the time they get a nasal swab. A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a portable COVID-19 micro-PCR diagnostic system that enables rapid and accurate on-site screening of infectious diseases.
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Tiny decoy sponges attract coronavirus away from lung cells
Imagine if scientists could stop the coronavirus infection in its tracks simply by diverting its attention away from living lung cells? A new therapeutic countermeasure, announced in a Nano Letters study by researchers from Boston University's National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) and the University of California San Diego, appears to do just that in experiments.
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News from the exhibitors of MEDICA and COMPAMED

Avery Dennison Medical Introduces Eight Adhesive Materials, Wound Care Solutions at Medica 2019
DÜSSELDORF, GERMANY – 18 November 2019 – Avery Dennison Medical is launching eight new products at the 2019 Medica International Trade Fair, which begins today and runs through November 21 at the...
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Canada at MEDICA, Düsseldorf (November 18 - 21, 2019)
Biggest Canadian Participation Ever MEDICA – the leading international medical tradeshow – has been attracting generations of Canadian visitors and exhibitors. This year, 59 Canadian medical...
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Dunn promotes a variety of medical tubing solutions at Compamed
Wayne, Pa. (October 25, 2019) — Dunn Industries, a Tekni-Plex business unit, will exhibit the latest medical tubing innovations at Compamed (Hall 8A / F12), Messe Dusseldorf, November 18-21.
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Natvar discusses innovative microextrusion, silicone medical tubing at Medica
Wayne, Pa. (October 23, 2019) — Natvar, a Tekni-Plex business unit, will exhibit the latest medical tubing innovations at MEDICA (Hall 6 / H30), Messe Dusseldorf, November 18-21. Microextrusion...
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Production of central venous catheters (CVC) from special urethane material
Optimized design of central venous catheters reduces risk of complications In the U.S., more than 5 million central venous catheters (CVCs) are inserted every year, which corresponds to 15 million...
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Ethylene Oxide Sterilization Solutions: reliable and safe
RSD will be this year at MEDICA trade fair, in Dusseldorf, from November 18th to 21st. For us, it is a good moment to show our EO Sterilization solutions , based on a turnkey proposals and...
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Bionix Development Corporation is a quality driven, service oriented multi-national company committed to acquiring, developing, manufacturing and marketing innovative medical products that help people
Bionix Development Corporation – Going Beyond   Since our founding in 1984, Bionix Development Corporation has been focused on Going Beyond. Going Beyond means more than simply making useful...
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Pioneering UK pressure mattress solutions to be showcased at MEDICA 2019 (Hall 16, Stand KI7-6)
A UK company, who specialises in the development and manufacture of ‘zero pressure’ technology will be at MEDICA to showcase their full range of pioneering mattress solutions. Over the last...
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New Bearing Race Design Launches Geeplus Voice Coil Motor Life Cycle to More Than 100 Million Cycles
Beckenham, United Kingdom  – In order to provide even smoother and considerably longer operation of their VM38 voice coil motor, Geeplus has developed a new version which incorporates redesigned...
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New Geeplus Pinch Valves Suit a Wide Range of Applications
Beckenham, United Kingdom  -In response to the growing demand for small-size low-power control components, the new range of pinch valves will suit a wide variety of applications calling for...
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New Suture Technology May Reduce Tissue Strangulation
Teleflex Medical OEM, a global leader in specialized sutures, braids, and fibers, announces an innovative suture technology: Force Fiber Fusion® Suture. This “two-in- one” construct transitions from...
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Raumedic joins Medical Valley EMN e.V.
Helmbrechts/Erlangen  – The medical technology company Raumedic has become a member of the northern Bavarian medical cluster Medical Valley EMN e.V. More than 200 key players in the Nuremberg...
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