Laboratory equipment / diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine
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News from the editors of MEDICA-tradefair.com

Compact CRISPR system enables portable COVID-19 testing
A new form of CRISPR technology that takes advantage of a compact RNA-editing protein could lead to improved diagnostic tests for COVID-19.The platform, developed by bioengineer Magdy Mahfouz and his KAUST colleagues, relies on a miniature form of the Cas13 protein that some microbes use to defend themselves from viruses.
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New method makes masked proteins in nerve cells visible
An international team of scientists developed a new method and visualized specific receptor proteins in nerve cells that are important for learning. The results were published in the renowned journal Nature Communications.
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Simple and cheap urine test can detect urothelial cancers in Lynch Syndrome patients
Researchers have shown for the first time that it is possible to detect signs of urothelial cancer using a simple, postal, urine test in Lynch Syndrome (LS) patients who are at high risk of developing tumours.
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Stem cells from the bioreactor
With the aid of artificial stem cells, it will soon be possible to establish new treatments for previously incurable diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. At the Fraunhofer Project Center for Stem Cell Process Engineering SPT, a process for the mass production of these so called induced pluripotent stem cells is being developed. This process involves new materials.
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New methods for detecting single molecules
Resistance to antibiotics is on the rise worldwide. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Physical Measurement Techniques IPM alongside the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich have developed a process for rapidly detecting multidrug-resistant pathogens. The unique feature: Even one single molecule of DNA is sufficient for pathogen detection.
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Lung model proves viability of spectroscopy technique
Take a nice, deep breath. Now imagine your lungs: myriad airways like branches, each with tiny alveoli like leaves. This alveolar structure is key to the absorption of oxygen and excretion of carbon dioxide that we call "breath." As we breathe, the volume of gases in the lungs is continually changing with varying degrees of inhalation and exhalation.
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Prevention of cervical cancer with HPV self-testing
Cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases of the female reproductive organs. Human papilloma viruses are almost always responsible for cervical cancer and the corresponding precancerous lesions. As part of the statutory preventive medical check-up, women from the age of 20 can have a cell smear taken from the cervix once a year, the so-called Pap test, to detect cell changes.
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Carbon nanotube-based sensor can detect SARS-CoV-2 proteins
Using specialized carbon nanotubes, MIT engineers have designed a novel sensor that can detect SARS-CoV-2 without any antibodies, giving a result within minutes. Their new sensor is based on technology that can quickly generate rapid and accurate diagnostics, not just for Covid-19 but for future pandemics, the researchers say.
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Concordia researchers develop a new way to find cancer at the nanometre scale
Diagnosing and treating cancer can be a race against time. By the time the disease is diagnosed in a patient, all too often it is advanced and able to spread throughout the body, decreasing chances of survival. Early diagnosis is key to stopping it.
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New values for better diagnoses
Lymphocytes belong to the white blood cells. They consist of several subgroups with different tasks in immune defence. Which and how many lymphocytes are in the blood provides information about our current state of health as well as congenital or acquired immune deficiencies. This composition in the blood can be determined precisely with the help of the most modern flow cytometry.
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New technique identifies pathogenic particles in the blood
Autoimmune diseases – that is diseases where our own immune system damages the body – are growing, but we know little about what triggers them. Researchers are now a step closer to finding an explanation. With the help of a new technique, researchers from Aarhus University have succeeded in identifying the particles in the blood that determine the development of autoimmune diseases.
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New technique shows early biochemical changes in tumors
Researchers at the University of Arkansas have demonstrated the first use of a noninvasive optical technique to determine complex biochemical changes in cancers treated with immunotherapy.
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New sensor for SARS-CoV-2 and other viruses based on GSI nanotechnology
Easy and fast detection of viruses are crucial in a pandemic. Based on single-nanopore membranes of GSI, an international interdisciplinary team of researchers developed a test method that detects SARS-CoV-2 in saliva, without sample pretreatment, with the same sensitivity as a qPCR test, and in only 2 hours. On top, the sensor can distinguish infectious from non-infectious corona viruses.
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On our way to the production of artificial heart tissue
At the newly opened Deutsches Museum Nuremberg, the University of Bayreuth offers insights into its expertise in the field of biofabrication involving unique materials, for example spider silk. The research combines natural growth processes and technical systems with the aim of specifically rebuilding damaged tissue in organs, skin, nerves, and tendons.
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Consumer protection: Novel method for detecting hormonally active substances
Scientists from the Universities of Dresden and Leipzig have presented a new method for detecting hormonally active substances in food, cosmetics and water in the journal "Biosensors & Bioelectronics".
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AMD: Reading ability crucial indicator of functional loss
In geographic atrophy, a late form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), reading ability is closely related to the altered retinal structure. This has been demonstrated by researchers from the Department of Ophthalmology at the University Hospital Bonn with colleagues at the National Eye Institute and the University of Utah.
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Sharper images through artificial amino acids
Dr. Gerti Beliu has started a new research group at the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg in September. He uses novel techniques to exploit the resolution of microscopy more effectively and to develop new applications for biomedicine.
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International research alliance aims to translate new cervical cancer screening strategy to low-income settings
An international research alliance announces the five-year Horizon 2020 CHILI project on 'A community-based HPV screening implementation in low-income countries' to develop a cervical cancer screening strategy. The strategy includes a new cervical cancer screening test which is currently being developed in ELEVATE.
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New imaging method for the detection of gastric lymphomas
A new imaging technique for the detection of MALT lymphomas, malignant tumours of the lymphatic system, could probably save patients numerous gastroscopies. A study group of MedUni Wien achieved a high imaging accuracy by way of PET/MR and by using a PET Tracer directed against a certain cell receptor.
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Detecting dementia in the blood
Empa researcher Peter Nirmalraj wants to image proteins with unprecedented precision – and thus gain insights into the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's. This should pave the way for an earlier diagnosis of the dementia disorder via a simple blood test. Together with neurologists from the Kantonsspital St.Gallen, a successful pilot study has now been completed.
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Saliva testing may allow early detection of human papillomavirus–driven head and neck cancers
High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) can be detected at diagnosis in saliva samples from the vast majority of patients with HPV-driven head and neck cancers, improving disease identification and monitoring, according to a new study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.
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Antibiotic levels measurable in breath for first time
Freiburg researchers are testing a biosensor for personalized dosing of medications. Antibiotic sensor validated in animal model for blood, saliva, urine and breath samples and the risk of resistant strains of bacteria can also be reduced.
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Two-hour glucose tolerance test predicts decline in episodic memory
Diabetes is a risk factor for cognitive decline. In a study of the University of Turku and Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare, the researchers observed that already a higher two-hour glucose level in the glucose tolerance test predicts worse performance in a test measuring episodic memory after ten years. Decline in episodic memory is one of the first symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease.
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New method enables 3D microscopy of human organs
Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, divide in their new method organs by the use of a 3D-printed matrix, creating portions of tissue with the optimal size for optical imaging using 3D technology. Specific cell types in human organs can be studied with micrometer precision to study for example other human organs and diseases.
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The Dynamic Tracking of Tissue-Specific Secretory Proteins
Researchers have presented a method for profiling tissue-specific secretory proteins in live mice.
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News from the exhibitors of MEDICA and COMPAMED

Fodeco Food Development Company hits the mark at MEDICA 2021
Today ends our first experience as exhibitors at Medica Trade Fair 2021 in Dusseldorf, Germany. As the only company in the food sector attending the 2021 trade fair, Fodeco has definitely hit the mark...
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Fodeco launches Mango and Maracuja Fruttino: a delicious dessert for people with dysphagia.
Fodeco launches a new special product with its brand of functional food Eucibus, dedicated to people with swallowing and chewing problems. Its name is Mango and Maracuja Fruttino and it is a creamy...
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Warwick SASCo showcases pioneering resuable plastic polyware medical devices at MEDICA 2021
Warwick SASCo Ltd – an independent family-run business specialising in the supply of sterilizable polyware for hospitals – is delighted to be joining the ABHI UK Pavilion at MEDICA 2021 (15 – 18...
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Rousselot® Biomedical launches Quali-Pure™
Rousselot®, Darling Ingredients’ health brand and the global leader of collagen-based solutions launches Quali-Pure™, a range of gelatins for biomedical applications with controlled endotoxin...
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PolyNovo launches pioneering NovoSorb® BTM synthetic wound matrix technology at MEDICA 2021
PolyNovo UK Ltd – a UK medical devices company specialising in the development of surgical solutions using the patented polymer technology NovoSorb® – will be joining the ABHI UK Pavilion at MEDICA...
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FLEXcon Announces Global Launch of New PHARMcal® Portfolio for Pharmaceutical Labeling
High-Performance Materials Engineered to Support a Broad Range of End-Use Applications  Spencer, Mass. – August 19, 2021 - FLEXcon Company, Inc., an innovator in adhesive coating and...
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AS CHEMI-PHARM AND INNOPOLIS INSENERID OÜ ENTERED INTO AN AGREEMENT FOR THE DESIGN OF A PHARMACEUTICAL FACTORY
An extension with cleanrooms will be added to the factory completed in Tänassilma Technology Park two years ago by Chemi-Pharm, a manufacturer of disinfectants and luxury cosmetics. Chemi-Pharm’s...
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Envomed Team completes successful week promoting the Envomed 80 in South Korea
The Envomed team touched down in South Korea at the beginning of this week knowing a full schedule of engagements awaited them. Now the team can reflect on a week of success, as their packed schedule...
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Second Envomed 80 Unit installed at Soroka University Medical Center
Following the successful performance of their first Envomed 80 on-site medical waste treatment solution, Soroka University Medical Center at the Clalit has called on the Envomed team to install a...
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