Laboratory equipment / diagnostic tests -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

News about Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica

Image: Black and white microscope image of a patch with a spiky surface; Copyright: Khademhosseini lab

Extraction of skin interstitial fluid using microneedle patches

05/06/2020

Researchers at the Terasaki Institute enhance tool for extraction of samples used in monitoring patient health.
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Image: A young man with a bald head shows the scar of skull surgery; Copyright: PantherMedia/hplovecraft.mail.ru

Mapping immune cells in brain tumors with AI

04/06/2020

It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now been able to describe the composition of the immune cells of various types of brain tumors. This will provide an important foundation for future immunotherapy approaches.
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Image: particles from a simple breath test behind a petri dish with chips ins it; Copyright: Ben-Gurion University

One minute electro-optical coronavirus test

29/05/2020

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev's Prof. Gabby Sarusi has developed a one-minute electro-optical test of nose, throat or breath samples that will identify both asymptomatic and affected carriers of the COVID-19 virus in under one minute with greater than 90 percent accuracy.
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Image: 7 weeks old human embryo surrounded by placenta; Copyright: Hill, M.A. (2020, May 18)

Unique insight into development of human brain

28/05/2020

Stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new research model of the early embryonic brain. The aim of the model is to study the very earliest stages of brain to understand how different regions in the brain are formed during embryonic development.
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Image: red, green and yellow droplets; Copyright: Pak Kin Wong, Penn State

New urine testing method holds promise for kidney stone sufferers

27/05/2020

An improved urine-testing system for people suffering from kidney stones inspired by nature and proposed by researchers from Penn State and Stanford University may enable patients to receive results within 30 minutes instead of the current turnaround time of a week or more.
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Image: small portable device next to tennis ball; Copyright: Nishiyama K. et al., Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical. April 21, 2020

COVID-19: technology can detect anti-virus antibody in 20 minutes

25/05/2020

Researchers have succeeded in detecting anti-avian influenza virus antibody in blood serum within 20 minutes, using a portable analyzer they have developed to conduct rapid on-site bio tests. If a suitable reagent is developed, this technology could be used to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of COVID-19.
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Independent studies show increased thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in COVID-19 patients

25/05/2020

Research teams at Hamburg-Eppendorf University Hospital and Beijing Union Medical College Hospital Beijing found that SARS-CoV-2 infections can lead to thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. In addition...
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Image: Tube being filled in a laboratory setting; Copyright: UEF/ Raija Törrönen

Boost cancer treatment with new LAT1 inhibitor

18/05/2020

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland have developed a new and promising drug compound for the treatment of cancer that inhibits natural amino acids from entering cancer cells. Since amino acids are essential for the growth and division of cancer cells, the new LAT1 inhibitor makes it possible to inhibit their growth. The study was published in the journal Apoptosis.
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Image: Woman pointing at data on a monitor; Copyright: Nathan L. Galli, University of Utah

Pattern found in tumors predicts life expectancy

18/05/2020

For the past 70 years, the best indicator of life expectancy for a patient with glioblastoma (GBM) has simply been age at diagnosis. Now, an international team of scientists has experimentally validated a predictor that is not only more accurate but also more clinically relevant: a pattern of co-occurring changes in DNA abundance levels.
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Image: A gloved hand holds a cup with an urine sample; Copyright: PantherMedia/belchonok

COVID-19: kidney inflammation as early warning sign for severe course

13/05/2020

Scientists from the University Medical Center Goettingen develop a conceivable course of action for patients with COVID-19 infections to predict severity of systemic disease and complications. Published online in The Lancet.
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Image: An electronic component with a cable and a light; Copyright: Massood Tabib-Azar/University of Utah College of Engineering

Portable, reusable test for COVID-19

12/05/2020

University of Utah engineer is developing a fast, reusable test for COVID-19 that works with cellphones.
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Image: group of scientists with face masks; Copyright: Cima Universidad de Navarra

New COVID-19 diagnostic platform more efficient than PCR test kits

08/05/2020

Cima Universidad de Navarra researchers have developed a large-scale, highly sensitive COVID-19 diagnostic platform more efficient than the commercial PCR test kits currently available. It consists of a ribonucleic acid (RNA) extraction method which allows large quantities of samples to be processed in parallel, independent of commercial extraction test kits.
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Image: components of the 3D printed microscope; Copyright: Dr Joel Collins

Print your own laboratory-grade microscope

08/05/2020

For the first time, labs around the world can 3D print their own precision microscopes to analyse samples and detect diseases , thanks to an open-source design created at the University of Bath.
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Image: 5 images showing cross section of nerves, an incision along the nerves and healthy nerve fibers; Copyright: Martin Bech

Unique 3D-images reveal the architecture of nerve fibers

07/05/2020

In an international collaboration led by Lund University in Sweden, researchers have used synchrotron light to study what happens to the nerves in diabetes. The technique shows the 3D-structure of nerve fibers in very high resolution.
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Image: woman in a protective suit working at the high-security laboratory; Copyright: IVI

Laboratory technology: coronavirus clone goes "viral"

05/05/2020

Researchers in virology and veterinary bacteriology at the University of Bern have cloned the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The synthetic clones are being used by research groups worldwide to test corona samples, find antiviral drugs and develop vaccines as quickly as possible. The method developed in Bern can also be used in future to combat other highly infectious viruses.
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Image: retina of a glaucoma patient; Copyright: UCL/Western Eye Hospital

AI-supported test for early signs of glaucoma progression

04/05/2020

A new test can detect glaucoma progression 18 months earlier than the current gold standard method, according to results from a UCL-sponsored clinical trial. The technology, supported by an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm, could help accelerate clinical trials, and eventually may be used in detection and diagnostics.
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Image: Man blowing his nose; Copyright: panthermedia.net Klaus-Peter Adler

Nasal biomarkers: predicting of pollen-specific allergy symptoms

01/05/2020

For people with allergies, contact with pollen leads to symptoms such as sneezing, rhinitis and watery eyes. This may sound trivial, but is in fact a complex correlation of physiological processes. As these have not yet been fully understood, we do not know exactly yet how allergies develop and how the symptoms are triggered.
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Image: Woman using a microscope in a laboratory setting; Copyright: UFSCar

Detecting biomarker of early-stage multiple sclerosis

27/04/2020

Diagnostic strategy developed by Brazilian researchers can also be used to distinguish MS from neuromyelitis optica, another demyelinating disorder. The two diseases have similar symptoms but must be treated differently.
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Image: Three scientists at a laboratory bench; Copyright: PantherMedia/AlexNazaruk

Superheroes in smocks: World Laboratory Day 2020

23/04/2020

Laboratories and laboratory technology are perhaps the most important component of today's medicine - they save and secure quality of life, especially in times of infectious diseases such as COVID-19, but also in cases of cancer, chronic or other diseases. The World Laboratory Day on 04/23 draws attention to these superheroes of medicine.
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Image: A woman measuring her blood glucose with a continous sensor at her arm and a receiver device; Copyright: PantherMedia/Click and Photo

Breakthrough could open doors to continuous health-monitoring devices

23/04/2020

Imagine a Fitbit that measures much more than steps, heart rate, and calories burned. It continually tracks all of the indicators of physiological health that currently require expensive and time-consuming analyses of blood plasma.
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Image: A woman of colour is pricking her finger for some blood; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

A non-invasive way of monitoring diabetes

22/04/2020

Saliva could be used instead of blood to monitor diabetes in a method proposed in research involving the University of Strathclyde. The test has been developed as an alternative to the current prevalent practice of monitoring blood glucose, which can be invasive, painful and costly.
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Image: three scientists behind the new optical imaging technology for 3D fluorescence microscopy; Copyright: The University of Hong Kong

3D imaging technology makes fluorescence microscopy more efficient

16/04/2020

Scientists have been using fluorescence microscopy to study the inner workings of biological cells and organisms for decades. However, many of these platforms are often too slow to follow the biological action in 3D; and too damaging to the living biological specimens with strong light illumination.
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Image: Professor Andrew Brooks in the laboratory; Copyright: Rutgers University

Coronavirus: saliva test gets FDA approval

14/04/2020

The FDA has granted emergency use authorization (EUA) to Rutgers' RUCDR Infinite Biologics and its collaborators for a new collection approach that utilizes saliva as the primary test biomaterial for the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, the first such approval granted by the federal agency.
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Image: tissue models in the laboratory; Copyright: K. Dobberke for Fraunhofer ISC

Coronavirus: tissue models for rapid drug testing

13/04/2020

The pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) is placing unprecedented restrictions on public life and economy. The global research efforts to fill the knowledge gaps regarding the new pathogen and to develop effective therapies are correspondingly large.
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Image: tablets, stethoscope and syringe on a medical document; Copyright: PantherMedia / tashatuvango

Noninvasive test offers early detection of lung tumors

08/04/2020

People who are at high risk of developing lung cancer are routinely screened with computed tomography (CT), which can detect tumors in the lungs. However, this test has an extremely high rate of false positives. Researchers at MIT have now developed a new approach to early diagnosis of lung cancer: a urine test that can detect the presence of proteins linked to the disease.
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Image: blood tubes for cancer diagnostics; Copyright: PantherMedia / alexraths

Blood test detects over 50 cancer types

06/04/2020

Blood test detects over 50 cancer types Researchers have developed the first blood test that can accurately detect more than 50 types of cancer and identify in which tissue the cancer originated, often before there are any clinical signs or symptoms of the disease.
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 Image: living cells; Copyright: MolGraphics/UW Medicine Institute for Protein Design

Cells turned into computers with protein logic gates

03/04/2020

Biochemists have created "smart" proteins that function inside human cells by turning genes on and off. The same basic tools that allow computers to function are now being used to control life at the molecular level. The advances have implications for future medicines and synthetic biology.
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 Image: microfluidic device; Copyright: Alonso Nichols, Tufts University

Scientists model conditions of ischemia on a microfluidic device

02/04/2020

Researchers led by biomedical engineers at Tufts University invented a microfluidic chip containing cardiac cells that is capable of mimicking hypoxic conditions following a heart attack - specifically when an artery is blocked in the heart and then unblocked after treatment.
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 Image: close-up of a blue eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hquality

Retinal cells for treating blindness

31/03/2020

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and St Erik Eye Hospital in Sweden have discovered a way to refine the production of retinal cells from embryonic stem cells for treating blindness in the elderly. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, they have also managed to modify the cells so that they can hide from the immune system to prevent rejection.
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 Image: deformations of microtubules in cells; Copyright: Syeda Rubaiya Nasrin, Tanjina Afrin, et al., ACS Applied Bio Materials. March 5, 2020

Microtubules shed light on neurological disease

30/03/2020

A new technique allows researchers to test how the deformation of tiny train track-like cell proteins affects their function. The findings could help clarify the roles of deformed "microtubules" in traumatic brain injuries and in neurological diseases like Parkinson's.
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 Image: A female physician is sitting at a table and uses a tablet computer; Copyright: PantherMedia/6okean.gmail.com

OncoMX knowledgebase enables research of cancer biomarkers

27/03/2020

The OncoMX knowledgebase will improve the exploration and research of cancer biomarkers in the context of related evidence, according to a recent article from the George Washington University (GW). The article is published in Clinical Oncology Clinical Cancer Informatics and is part of a special series called "Informatics Tools for Cancer Research and Care."
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 Image: A schematic drawing of a chip made of different components; Copyright: Kennet Burch, Boston College

New platform selectively identifies deadly strains of bacteria

25/03/2020

Using a single atom-thick sheet of graphene to track the electronic signals inherent in biological structures, a team led by Boston College researchers has developed a platform to selectively identify deadly strains of bacteria, an advance that could lead to more accurate targeting of infections with appropriate antibiotics, the team reported in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics.
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 Image: A female researcher is holding small vials in her hand that glow in different colors - Lena Dolgosheina; Copyright: Simon Fraser University

Coronavirus testing kits using RNA imaging technology

24/03/2020

Simon Fraser University researchers will use their pioneering imaging technology - called Mango, for its bright color - to develop coronavirus testing kits. They're among a small set of Canadian researchers who responded to the rapid funding opportunity recently announced by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) to help address COVID-19.
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 Image: A group of female and male researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Phil Jones, Augusta University

Novel coronavirus test provides fast, accurate results

23/03/2020

The Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia Department of Pathology has developed a novel, accurate coronavirus test that can tell patients if they are infected within about two hours instead of waiting typically days to hear from remote testing facilities.
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 Image: New technique

New laboratory technique 'prints' cells

20/03/2020

Take a neural stem cell in the brain: Whether this cell remains a stem cell or differentiates into a fully formed brain cell is ultimately determined by a complex set of molecular messages the cell receives from countless neighbors. Understanding these messages is key for scientists hoping to harness these stem cells to treat neurological conditions like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's.
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Image: New genetic method to accurately synthesize DNA; Copyright: panthermedia.net/nikesidoroff

Genetics: New low-cost method to reduce DNA errors

18/03/2020

DNA only persists through replication - naturally or synthetically. While humans need the genetic material to be reproduced in order to replace old or damaged cells, the ability to replicate DNA in a laboratory setting can provide researchers insights into the mechanisms of disease or the platform to develop treatments.
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 Image: Laboratory analysis of DNA; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sergunt

Genetic screening: New CRISPR technology to target RNA viruses

17/03/2020

New genetic screening platform using CRISPR technology for targeting thousands of genes in a massively-parallel fashion; accurate and fast method of finding best guides to detect, target, and knockdown specific RNA targets.
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Image: Scientists using AI; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AndrewLozovyi

AI and human knowledge for faster, better cancer diagnosis

16/03/2020

A new system combining artificial intelligence (AI) with human knowledge promises faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis. The powerful technology, developed by a team led by engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses digital images of tissue samples to match new cases of suspected cancer with previously diagnosed cases in a database.
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Image: Medical diagnostics on coronavirus; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vasyl Faievvch

Diagnostic tool: Rapid response coronavirus test

16/03/2020

Hackensack Meridian Health, New Jersey's largest and most comprehensive health network, is pleased to announce that the Center for Discovery and Innovation (CDI) has created a test to dramatically reduce the time it takes for diagnosing COVID-19. This is a major advance that will benefit patients, create a more effective triage system in hospitals and better control the spread of disease.
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Image: colorful graphic of a virus’ structure; Copyright: University of Basel, Computational Pharmacy

Coronavirus: virtual screening for active substances

13/03/2020

The University of Basel is part of the global search for a drug to fight the rampant coronavirus. Researchers in the Computational Pharmacy group have so far virtually tested almost 700 million substances, targeting a specific site on the virus – with the aim of inhibiting its multiplication.
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Image: three researchers in front of a computer; Copyright: Unicamp

AI: blood test points to risk of weight gain and diabetes

12/03/2020

Researchers at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, have developed a computer program that analyzes molecules in blood plasma to search for biomarkers that identify individuals who are at risk of becoming overweight and developing obesity-related diseases.
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Image: Space Tango CubeLab on board the International Space Station ISS without gravity; Copyright: Space Tango

Producing human tissue in space

10/03/2020

On 6 March at 11:50 PM EST, the International Space Station resupply mission Space X CRS-20 took off from Cape Canaveral (USA). On board: 250 test tubes from the University of Zurich containing adult human stem cells. These stem cells will develop into bone, cartilage and other organs during the month-long stay in space.
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Image: several photoacoustic images in comparison; Copyright: Chulhong Kim (POSTECH)

Exploring deep tissues using photoacoustic imaging

09/03/2020

Photoacoustic imaging has gained global attention for capturing images without causing pains or using ionizing radiation. Recently, many researchers have heavily studied on observing deep tissues to apply the photoacoustic imaging to clinical diagnosis and practices.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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FIND Collaborate with SpeeDx and QuantuMDx

14/11/2019

The Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics (FIND) are supporting a collaboration with SpeeDx and QuantuMDx to assess the feasibility of developing low-cost point of care (POC) tests for...
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Canada at MEDICA, Düsseldorf (November 18 - 21, 2019)

11/11/2019

Biggest Canadian Participation Ever MEDICA – the leading international medical tradeshow – has been attracting generations of Canadian visitors and exhibitors. This year, 59 Canadian medical...
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Linnodee Diagnostics Ltd - specialising in veterinary diagnostic tests for Leptospirosis

08/11/2019

Linnodee Diagnostics Ltd. is dedicated to the design and manufacture of clinical and veterinary diagnostic tests for Leptospirosis. The company was established in 1999 by the late Dr Ernest F Logan...
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Image: Blood sample labelled

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Oxford MEStar to Announce Launch of measurePRO POC Faecal Occult Blood Test at MEDICA

25/10/2019

 Oxford MEStar will be attending the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf (November 18th-21st 2019) as part of the ABHI UK pavillion in Hall 16 (stand 16K03-3) and announcing the launch of their new...
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BioTeZ is starting to develop a new method for directly measuring the primary effect of drugs on their target molecule.

17/10/2019

BioTeZ starts the project for the development of a companion diagnostic procedure. The aim is to determine the optimal drug dose for each patient to reduce side effects, to achieve the Therapeutic...
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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IVDR-Alliance offers One-Stop-Solution for IVDR-compliance

26/09/2019

The IVD-Alliance is an intitiative to support companies in die IVD-business with knowledge and test equipment to reach the European IVDR-compliance until May 2020. The alliance is a cooperation...
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01/08/2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Glucometer next to a smartphone that shows the blood glucose level; Copyright: panthermedia.net/simpson33

DiaDigital: making sense of diabetes apps

02/01/2019

While they are very useful, health apps have one major drawback: anyone can release and distribute them unchecked. Only some apps require medical device certification. So how can users spot a great, safe and useful app? When it comes to diabetes apps, the “DiaDigital” seal of distinction is the answer.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Neighbours as guests at MEDICA - Interview at the Polish joint stand

15/11/2018

100 Polish exhibitors will be present at this year's MEDICA and show their new innovations in medical technology. You can find out what there is to discover at the Polish joint stand in our interview.
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Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15/11/2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with ERBA Diagnostics Mannheim GmbH

15/11/2018

A lot of answers in medicine are found in the laboratory. Correct analysis is key to find the right diagnosis and cure for the patient. We learn more about innovative analysis devices at the stand of ERBA Diagnostics at MEDICA 2018.
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Past, present and future of MEDICA – Interview with Horst Giesen

12/11/2018

Even before MEDICA begins, the Düsseldorf trade fair grounds are alive like a beehive: in the halls, stands are built and exhibits are delivered, while the trade fair management coordinates logistics and services for exhibitors and visitors. We were still able to have a short talk to Horst Giesen, Global Portfolio Director Health & Medical Technologies of Messe Düsseldorf, despite all the bustle.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30/04/2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: Several colorful pills placed on a target, one of them is in the center; Copyright: panthermedia.net/georgemuresan

Personalized Medicine – focused on healing

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not want to measure all patients with the same yardstick anymore. Instead, it aims to precisely fit the therapy to the cause of their disease. This often means a more successful treatment with less side effects for patients. And for physicians, interdisciplinary cooperation and decision making come to the fore.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Three proofs in one go - Interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG

13/11/2017

Measles, mumps and rubella are usually mentioned in connection with the well-known polyvalent vaccine. Now, a novel DNA test can be used to remedy an unclear situation about an infection. It is supposed to detect all three diseases in just one step. Find out more in our interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG at MEDICA 2017.
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