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Digitization of healthcare

Dear Sir or Madam,

Digitization is on everyone's lips. But where does Germany stand? We asked the Head of e-Health, Gematik & Telematics Infrastructure at the Federal Ministry of Health. The country is on the right track, but "we need to focus less on technology and concentrate more on people and processes," says Sebastian Zilch in our interview.

Get to know in our Topic of the Month what digitization can look like in practice. Because during pregnancy in particular, digitization may provide relief – not only in the healthcare system.

Enjoy reading!

Anne Hofmann
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Digital services during pregnancy
Interview: Digitization of healthcare
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Digitization of healthcare: Where does Germany rank?

Interview

Image: A smartphone with an open app that tracks the sleep cycle is laying on a glass table; Copyright: sevetyfourimages
How far along is the digitization of the German healthcare system at the moment? It is an interesting question for both users and patients who can benefit directly from digitization and providers who plan to complement the German healthcare market with digitization products and solutions.
Click here for the interview
Digitization of healthcare: Where does Germany rank?
All interviews at MEDICA-tradefair.com
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Locally advanced cervical cancer: Better odds using personalized brachytherapy

Imaging and diagnostics / medical equipment and devices

For the first time, a study conducted by a research group at the Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital using data from the multicentre EMBRACE-I trial demonstrated the superiority of a targeted approach in brachytherapy.
read more
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How COVID-19 permanently damages the heart

Imaging and diagnostics / medical equipment and devices

An interdisciplinary research team from MHH has used innovative molecular methods and a high-resolution microscopy technique to show how the ongoing inflammation in COVID-19 attacks the heart tissue.
read more
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All-round care: digital services during pregnancy

Topic of the Month

Image: Pregnant woman in a yellow dress is looking at her phone; Copyright: DragonImages
Digital services relating to pregnancy are still far from commonplace in Germany. Yet their usefulness is beyond question. Of course, they should not replace the midwife or the visit to the doctor. But in our Topic of the Month, you can find out just how diverse the possibilities of digitization can be during the time between a positive pregnancy test and birth.
Read more about our Topic of the Month
All-round care: digital services during pregnancy
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Analyzing disease progression and cell processes with TIGER: in vivo and non-invasively

Laboratory equipment and diagnostic tests

Researchers at the Helmholtz Institute for RNA-based Infection Research (HIRI) and the Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) in Würzburg have developed a technology they call TIGER. It allows complex processes in individual cells to be deciphered in vivo by recording past RNA transcripts.
read more
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Radioactive substances fight cancer in the mini-lab

Laboratory equipment and diagnostic tests

Two Dresden research institutes want to reduce the number of animal experiments in radiopharmaceutical research with a new idea.
read more
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Type 2 diabetes: Machine learning can predict poor glycemic control from patient information systems

Laboratory equipment and diagnostic tests

The risk for poor glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes can be predicted with confidence by using machine learning methods, a new study from Finland finds.
read more
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When antibodies do a pirouette

Laboratory equipment and diagnostic tests

Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg have developed a method for binding specific molecules in samples and serums, such as antibodies in the blood, to the surface of iron oxide particles thus allowing them to be identified using an inexpensive and compact detector.
read more
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Realtime monitoring with wearable reveals IBS-related changes

IT systems and IT solutions

Associate Professor Fumio Tanaka and his research group at the Osaka Metropolitan University Graduate School of Medicine recorded the autonomic nervous system activity of IBS patients and healthy subjects using a wearable device and tracked activities such as defecation and sleep.
read more
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