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Responsive materials for smart implants

Dear Sir or Madam,

Today, implants can be used in a variety of ways to compensate for damage to the body or to stabilize it and help it heal. However, implants are not yet able to treat patients independently. Find out how research into intelligent implant materials could provide an important boost in this area in our interview.

Stay healthy!

Melanie Prüser
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Autonomous medical technology
Interview: Hospital: how an AI tool could improve patient safety
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Intelligent implants: when the material is the key to the solution

Topic of the Month

Image: A group of researchers is discussing a chemical structural formula in front of a whiteboard; Copyright: PantherMedia/depositedhar
Today we use implants to stabilize or compensate for injuries inside the body and to aid in the healing process. Implants cannot act autonomously and treat the patient if they deem it necessary. However, it is just a matter of time before this happens because research on intelligent implant materials that respond to stimuli is on the cusp of a breakthrough.
Read more about our Topic of the Month
Intelligent implants: when the material is the key to the solution
Autonomous medical technology: independently in the body
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COVID-19 associated with leukoencephalopathy on brain MRI

Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), COVID-19-related disseminated leukoencephalopathy (CRDL) represents an important - albeit uncommon - differential consideration in patients with neurologic manifestations of coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
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Measuring the human being in micrometer steps

Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

Researchers from Hanover Medical School (MHH), Mainz University Hospital and HELIOS University Hospital Wuppertal at Witten/Herdecke University are leading an international, multidisciplinary consortium that makes high-resolution, three-dimensional X-ray images of the human body possible.
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AI deciphers genetic instructions

Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

With the help of artificial intelligence (AI) a German-American team of scientists deciphered some of the more elusive instructions encoded in DNA. Their neural network trained on high-resolution maps of protein-DNA interactions uncovers subtle DNA sequence patterns throughout the genome, thus providing a deeper understanding of how these sequences are organized to regulate genes.
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Hospital: how an AI tool could improve patient safety

Interview

Image: A physician with a tablet computer in one hand is standing next to a patient’s bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia LtD
Sometimes, a hospital stay can proceed successfully without a hitch. At other times, there might be an unexpected turn of events if the patient exhibits complications. Early identification of these patients could prevent unnecessary suffering. A new research project intends to develop an AI-based tool that predicts a patient's risk of complications at an early stage.
Click here for the interview
Hospital: how an AI tool could improve patient safety
All interviews at MEDICA-tradefair.com
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Health apps: getting to grips with the digital placebo effect

Public Health & Associations, Information and Communication Technology

Sharing information about the expected effect of a health app before its use and providing positive feedback regarding its effectiveness after its use have the potential to strengthen the placebo effect.
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Raman spectroscopy: European laboratories aim to create common standards

Public Health & Associations, Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica

Is the tissue healthy or pathologically altered? Is the antibiotic effective against a certain bacterium or is the bacterium resistant to it? Raman spectroscopy can help to answer such questions quickly and precisely. However, one challenge for the use of the light-based analysis method in everyday clinical practice is that the results can be highly sensitive to the measurement conditions.
read more
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Wearables: an intelligent health care product for on the go

Economy & Markets, Information and Communication Technology

A project at Landshut University of Applied Sciences is aiming to improve wearables for medical applications and to enable the portable minicomputers to make more accurate measurements.
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