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Autonomous medical technology: treatment in the body

Dear Sir or Madam,

Medical technology is constantly evolving. Even though trained personnel are essential for the safe implementation of therapies, in the future, part of the treatment may be handed over to systems in the patient's body. Find out in the current Topic of the Month how various applications like implants can make medical technology more autonomous.

Stay healthy!

Melanie Prüser
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Autonomous medical technology
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Autonomous medical technology: independently in the body

Topic of the Month

Image: Artist’s rendering of small robots with grapplers and searchlights that swim between red blood cells; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andreus
Therapies need to be carried out with high reliability by trained personal. This will not change in the future. But maybe we will be able to let systems in the patient’s body do some of the work. Some approaches are already aiming to make implants more independent so they will be able to flexibly react to changes. Read more in our Topic of the Month!
Read more about our Topic of the Month
Autonomous medical technology: independently in the body
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Engineers share model for ventilating two patients with one ventilator

Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

As Covid-19 continues to put pressure on healthcare providers around the world, engineers at the University of Bath have published a mathematical model that could help clinicians to safely allow two people to share a single ventilator.
read more
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New technology could upend DNA sequencing for certain mutations

Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities.
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"String of lights" indicates excitation propagation

Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

A type of novel molecular voltage sensor makes it possible to watch nerve cells at work. Researchers at the University of Bonn and the University of California in Los Angeles have now succeeded in significantly improving it. It allows the propagation of electrical signals in living nerve cells to be observed with high temporal and spatial resolution.
read more
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Using wearable tech to keep babies, pregnant women healthy

Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology

Doctors' opinions vary widely when it comes to exercise during pregnancy because research into pregnant women's fitness has been scarce. But with a new study, Shon Rowan - an associate professor with the West Virginia University School of Medicine - is using wearable technology to fill that knowledge gap.
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New device enables guided biopsies in real time

Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

A team from the Gamma and Neutron Spectroscopy Group of the Corpuscular Physics Institute (IFIC) has patented a new device for real-time guided biopsies, with direct application in any type of cancer that requires a biopsy and whose process must be carried out using ultrasound.
read more
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Machine learning enhances predictions of COVID-19 outcomes

Public Health & Associations, Information and Communication Technology

Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using a machine learning technique called "federated learning" to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress. The study was published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research - Medical Informatics.
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