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Resistances: when small pathogens become a great danger

Dear Sir or Madam,

Ten million – this many people could die from resistant pathogens by 2050 each year, according to a WHO report. In addition to tuberculosis, respiratory and urinary tract infections as well as sexually transmitted diseases will soon become untreatable. In order to avert this scenario, possible solutions are already intensively researched. You can read about the technology that can prevent and combat resistances in our Topic of the Month!

Have a healthy week,

Elena Blume
Editorial team MEDICA-tradefair.com

Table of Contents

Topic of the Month: Technology against resistances
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Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

Topic of the Month

Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu
An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
Read more in our Topic of the Month:
Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens
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mHealth: blood pressure monitoring like taking a video selfie

Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

Blood pressure monitoring might one day become as easy as taking a video selfie, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal. Transdermal optical imaging measures blood pressure by detecting blood flow changes in smartphone-captured facial videos.
read more
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Regenerative medicine: 'Bone in a dish'

Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

Like real bone, the material developed at Oregon Health & Science University has a 3D mineral structure populated with living cells, providing a unique model to study bone function, diseases, regeneration.
read more
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Tissue engineering: 3D printing the human heart

Laboratory Equipment, Diagnostica, Research & Technology

A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University has published a paper in Science that details a new technique allowing anyone to 3D bioprint tissue scaffolds out of collagen, the major structural protein in the human body. This first-of-its-kind method brings the field of tissue engineering one step closer to being able to 3D print a full-sized, adult human heart.
read more
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Medical back supports: human torso simulator offers promise for back brace

Physiotherapy, Orthopedy Technology, Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

Engineers have for the first time created a simulator mimicking the mechanical behaviour of the human torso - which could lead to innovations in the design of medical back supports. It allows researchers to test different back brace designs and configurations without needing to test them on people - removing significant logistical and ethical issues.
read more
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Wearables: dizziness monitoring device

Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

A ground-breaking device to help patients with dizziness problems has moved a step forward following a successful research study. Researchers from UEA and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH) have published the results of the biggest collection of continuous eye movement data after testing the effectiveness of a wearable diagnostic headset.
read more
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Health monitoring: soft wearable uses stretchable electronics

Research & Technology, Information and Communication Technology, Electromedicine, Medical Technology

A wireless, wearable monitor built with stretchable electronics could allow comfortable, long-term health monitoring of adults, babies and small children without concern for skin injury or allergic reactions caused by conventional adhesive sensors with conductive gels.
read more
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