News about imaging and diagnostics / medical equipment & devices -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

News about Electromedicine / Medical Technology

More about…

Image: Admission of practiced radiotherapy; Copyright: Philip Benjamin

Philip Benjamin

A new consortium for proton online adaptive radiation therapy

01/07/2022

A new consortium for the advancement of Proton Online Adaptive Radiation Therapy, ProtOnART, uniquely brings together researchers, clinicians, and industry.
Read more
Image: A man undergoes an X-ray examination, a doctor looks at the result of the bone density scan; Copyright: Getty

Getty

Quick, easy scan can reveal late-life dementia risk

30/06/2022

A long-term study has shown a common bone density scan can also show calcified plaque build-up in the abdominal aorta - revealing if someone is at increased risk of developing dementia.
Read more
Image: A close-up of the smart implant for spinal fusion surgery ; Copyright: iSMaRT Lab

iSMaRT Lab

Smart implants to monitor healing

29/06/2022

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering are creating patient-specific 3D-printed smart metamaterial implants that double as sensors to monitor spinal healing.
Read more
Image: Two men in white physicians’ coats in a hospital hallway - Dr. Philipp Ivanyi, Prof. Mohamed Omar; Copyright: Ilka Kosmalski/MHH

Ilka Kosmalski/MHH

Cancer therapy: MHH Sarcoma Center successfully DKG-certified

28/06/2022

The Sarcoma Center of the Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC) of the MHH, which is one of the oldest in the country, has been successfully certified by the German Cancer Society (DKG). In addition to the treatment of soft tissue tumors, the center was also recognized for the treatment of bone tumors.
Read more
Image: Photos of one patients surgery to reduce the size of the Adam’s apple; Copyright: UCLA Gender Health Program

UCLA Gender Health Program

Surgeons develop new technique to reduce Adam’s apple without neck scar

28/06/2022

Doctors at the UCLA Gender Health Program have developed a technique to reduce an Adam’s apple bump without leaving a scar on the patient’s neck.
Read more
Image: Device setup for a FLASH experiment consisting of many components; Copyright: Biophysics / GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research

Biophysics / GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research

New cooperation aims to further advance radiation therapy

27/06/2022

The GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, the Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM) and Varian, a Siemens Healthineers company from Palo Alto, California, intend to jointly advance medical-technical developments in the field of FLASH therapy and further pave the way to clinical application.
Read more
Image: Two female researchers examine the odor of a sample in a laboratory setting; Copyright: microgen@gmail.com

microgen@gmail.com

Digital nose facilitates early detection and diagnosis

22/06/2022

Many diseases can be treated successfully if they are diagnosed early. Research into a “digital (electronic) nose” is one promising development to facilitate early detection and diagnosis. That’s because body odors and their molecular composition are an early indicator of various diseases that often remain undetected in the early stages.
Read more
Image: Radiologists look at brain scans ; Copyright: imagesourcecurated

imagesourcecurated

Single brain scan can diagnose Alzheimer’s disease

22/06/2022

A single MRI scan of the brain could be enough to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, according to new research by Imperial College London.
Read more
Image: A diagram showing how the RAIS retractor is used to lift the abdominal wall during surgery; Copyright: University of Leeds/Dr Pete Culmer

University of Leeds/Dr Pete Culmer

Surgery: Low-tech - just what the doctor ordered

20/06/2022

Medical equipment that can be manufactured at low cost, is simple to use and can be easily maintained will help extend surgery to the 5 billion people worldwide who currently cannot get access to it, say researchers.
Read more
Image: A robot arm. Automated Needle Targeting with X-ray; Copyright: Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences

Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences

Automating renal access in kidney stone surgery using AI-enabled robot

20/06/2022

A novel AI-empowered robotic device successfully underwent clinical trial for assisting in percutaneous nephrolithotomy— surgery for removing kidney stones.
Read more
Image: Chest CT data interpreted by AI; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society

American Roentgen Ray Society

AI saves one hour of daily chest CT interpretation time in study

17/06/2022

Cardiothoracic radiologists exhibited a 22.1% reduction in chest CT interpretations times when having access to results from an automated AI support platform during real-world clinical practice.
Read more
Image: Blue-and-violet image of a blood clot; Copyright: Empa

Empa

Personalized medicine: Treatment of acute stroke

14/06/2022

A blood clot in the brain that blocks the supply of oxygen can cause an acute stroke. In this case, every minute counts. A team from Empa, the University Hospital in Geneva and the Hirslanden Clinic is currently developing a diagnostic procedure that can be used to start a tailored therapy in a timely manner, as they write in Scientific Reports.
Read more
Image: Tim Whelan stands at a radiation therapy machine and poses for the camera; Copyright: Georgia Kirkos/McMaster University

Georgia Kirkos/McMaster University

Radiotherapy not always needed for early breast cancer

13/06/2022

Older women with early stage breast cancer may not need radiotherapy after undergoing surgery, McMaster University researcher Timothy Whelan and his team has found.
Read more
Image: Neurologist doctor analyzing nervous system with EEG headset scanning in a woman; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Nerve stimulation promotes resolution of inflammation

10/06/2022

The nervous system is known to communicate with the immune system and regulate inflammation in the body. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now show how electrical activation of a specific nerve can promote healing in acute inflammation. The finding, which is published in the journal PNAS, opens new ways to accelerate resolution of inflammation.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Fibers for fibers – Textile implants repair the body

08/06/2022

We are nowadays already able to weave implants out of artificial fibers that can replace tissue or heal injuries. Different materials like polymers or nitinol are used to create flexible shapes. But the materials and their uses can still be improved.
Read more
Image: Visualization about how researchers developed a microbubble-assisted ultrasound-guided immunotherapy; Copyright: UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Microbubble technology to enhance cancer immunotherapy

08/06/2022

Researchers at UT Southwestern have developed a first-of-its-kind ultrasound-guided cancer immunotherapy platform that delivers immune-stimulating agents to cells for the development of systemic anti-tumor immunity.
Read more
Image: Three physicians in OR clothing work with a medical device; Copyright: USZ

USZ

Human liver treated in a machine and transplanted for the first time

07/06/2022

The multidisciplinary Zurich research team Liver4Life has succeeded in doing something during a treatment attempt that had never been achieved in the history of medicine until now: it treated an originally damaged human liver in a machine for three days outside a body and then implanted the recovered organ into a cancer patient. One year later, the patient is doing well.
Read more
Image: A tube made of a fiber mesh; Copyright: Andreas Heddergott/TUM

Andreas Heddergott/TUM

3D printed, bioinspired heart valves

06/06/2022

Researchers have developed 3D printed artificial heart valves designed to allow a patient’s own cells to form new tissue. To form these scaffolds using melt electrowriting – an advanced additive manufacturing technique – the team has created a new fabrication platform that enables them to combine different precise, customized patterns and hence to fine-tune the scaffold’s mechanical properties.
Read more
Image: A breast cancer cell captured in the process of division; Copyright: Wei Qian\National Cancer Institute

Wei Qian\National Cancer Institute

The paired perils of breast cancer and diabetes

03/06/2022

Study describes mechanism by which breast cancer suppresses insulin production, impairing blood sugar regulation and causing diabetes, which, in turn, promotes tumor growth.
Read more
Image: Portrait of a asian male in a lab coat - Tony Hu; Copyright: Sally Asher, Tulane University

Sally Asher, Tulane University

Tuberculosis: New blood test helps with diagnosis

03/06/2022

Researchers at Tulane University School of Medicine have developed a new highly sensitive blood test for tuberculosis (TB) that screens for DNA fragments of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria that causes the deadly disease.
Read more
Image: smiling man in a suit in front of a MRI machine - Prof Andrew Jabbour; Copyright: Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Virtual biopsy set to transform heart transplant care

02/06/2022

The days of heart transplant survivors undergoing invasive biopsies could soon be over after a new MRI technique has proven to be safe and effective; reducing complications and hospital admissions.
Read more
Image: different colored pills and a stethoscope on a cardiogram; Copyright: DragonImages

DragonImages

Researchers find new approach to treating cardiovascular diseases

02/06/2022

A specific protein in blood vessel cells plays a major role in the development of vascular and cardiovascular diseases: The presence of too many "thromboxane A2 receptors" hinders the formation of new blood vessels. A research team led by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) was able to describe the underlying process for the first time.
Read more
Image: Dr. Volker Hohmann poses and smiles for the camera ; Copyright: Universität Oldenburg

Universität Oldenburg

Another success for Oldenburg's hearing research

01/06/2022

Intelligent hearing aids that work even in difficult acoustic environments – that's what researchers at the university are working on in the Collaborative Research Center "Hearing Acoustics". The German Research Foundation is now funding the project for another four years.
Read more
Image: Side view of a child's head with a cohclea implant ; Copyright: Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Deaf children with learning delays benefit from cochlear implants more than hearing aids

30/05/2022

Keck Medicine of USC study demonstrates the need for early cochlear implant use for deaf children, regardless of developmental impairments.
Read more
Image: A proctologist holds an endoscope in his hand; Copyright: romankosolapov

romankosolapov

Computer-assisted colonoscopy identifies more precancerous polyps

30/05/2022

Colonoscopies performed with computer-aided detection, or artificial intelligence, (AI) saw an increase in the overall rate of detection of adenoma, or cancerous and precancerous polyps, by 27 percent in average-risk patients.
Read more
Image: A man is given general anesthesia; Copyright: nd3000

nd3000

Anesthesia: rhythmical deep sleep

26/05/2022

Researchers at the German Primate Center study influence of anesthetics on brain functions.
Read more
Image: A man undergoes an MRI scan accompanied by a doctor; Copyright: engagestock

engagestock

Review of 3D visualization techniques of medical images

26/05/2022

A research team provides a review of three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques for medical images, intending to bridge the gap between medical experts and visualization researchers. With medical professionals as target readers, the review was published in Health Data Science, a Science Partner Journal.
Read more
Image: elderly man holding his chest in pain; Copyright: anontae2522

anontae2522

Speech analysis app predicts worsening heart failure before symptom onset

25/05/2022

A voice analysis app used by heart failure patients at home recognises fluid in the lungs three weeks before an unplanned hospitalisation or escalation in outpatient drug treatment.
Read more
Image: Two men position a patient dummy between measuring devices on the floor; Copyright: Fraunhofer/Piotr Banczerowski

Fraunhofer/Piotr Banczerowski

3D-based position control in radiotherapy

24/05/2022

A research team at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF has worked closely with Varian Medical Systems (Fraunhofer IOF’s industrial partner) to develop a novel system for tumor radiotherapy, which improves cancer patients’ chances of recovery. The scientists behind the project were awarded the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize for the overall system.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Sonography training – Inexpensive models from the 3D printer

23/05/2022

Many medical disciplines rely on the tenet "Practice makes perfect". Sonography diagnostics is one of them. Unfortunately, constant training can be difficult, as patients with specific diseases are not present at a hospital all the time. The University Hospital Bonn is creating a solution for this problem: 3D printed models of joints and arteries are used in training.
Read more
Image: Locus coeruleus as observed in a 7T MRI scanner ; Copyright: University of Cambridge

University of Cambridge

Brain scanners: Hope for treating cognitive symptoms in Parkinson’s

23/05/2022

Ultra-powerful 7T MRI scanners could be used to help identify those patients with Parkinson’s disease and similar conditions most likely to benefit from new treatments for previously-untreatable symptoms, say scientists.
Read more
Image: A woman lies in her bed with dim lighting, on the nightstand is a small box that monitors her sleep; Copyright: Sleepiz AG

Sleepiz AG

Sleep screening: Sleepiz is your contactless at-home sleep laboratory

23/05/2022

People around the world suffer from sleep disorders. Some conditions like sleep apnea or chronic respiratory disease can lead to serious health problems. Patients require medical long-term monitoring, but it’s currently not an easy feat. Graduates of ETH Zurich and the University of St. Gallen plan to change that and developed Sleepiz.
Read more
Image: A woman in the bathroom is holding her stomach because of pain; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

Nanosensor platform could advance detection of ovarian cancer

18/05/2022

Lehigh University researchers, part of multi-institution team, use the fluorescence of carbon nanotubes and machine learning to create a ‘spectral fingerprint’ of a hard-to-diagnose cancer.
Read more
Image: A woman is pushed into an MRI; Copyright: Wavebreakmedia

Wavebreakmedia

Hyperpolarized nuclear MR: more precise diagnoses and personalized therapies

17/05/2022

Hyperpolarized nuclear magnetic resonance enables major medical advances in molecular diagnostics, for example for cardiovascular diseases or cancer therapy. Within the framework of the EU collaborative project "MetaboliQs", seven partners developed a microscopy method which enables the analysis of metabolic processes at the single cell level by means of diamond-based hyperpolarization.
Read more
Image: Illustration of an earth metaphor on an operating table; Copyright: Jacob Dwyer/Michigan Medicine

Jacob Dwyer/Michigan Medicine

Operating rooms are the climate change contributor no one’s talking about

12/05/2022

Two surgeons-in-training suggest some sustainable solutions for their energy-intensive discipline.
Read more
Image: A nurse is giving an injection to an elderly woman; Copyright: gstockstudio

gstockstudio

International Nurses Day 2022

12/05/2022

In the Corona pandemic, a fundamental resource in the health care system was hardly spared: nurses in hospitals and care facilities bore one of the greatest burdens of all during the pandemic. In addition, they were exposed to a high risk of infection. Without their efforts, many more people would have died. International Nurses Day highlights their role in the health care system.
Read more
Image: A van with a portable MRI system; Copyright: University of Tsukuba

University of Tsukuba

Portable MRI system for early detection of sports injuries

11/05/2022

Researchers at the University of Tsukuba develop a portable MRI system specifically for identifying wrist cartilage damage among athletes, providing a convenient means of early detection and treatment of injuries.
Read more
Image: Man holding his back from pain; Copyright: gpointstudio

gpointstudio

High-frequency spinal cord stimulation shows improved longer lasting pain relief

09/05/2022

Compared to older, low-frequency treatments, but study also finds some differences in perceived pain reduction between male and female patients
Read more
Image: radiological image of soft tissue lesions; Copyright: NYU’s Center for Data Science

NYU’s Center for Data Science

Breast-cancer: Radiologists and AI systems show differences in screenings

06/05/2022

Radiologists and artificial intelligence systems yield significant differences in breast-cancer screenings, a team of researchers has found. Its work, which appears in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, reveals the potential value of using both human and AI methods in making medical diagnoses.
Read more
Image: Doctor discusses lung scan with a patient; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Lung cancer treatment: model to predict patients with poor outcomes

04/05/2022

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are working to improve the ability to identify patients who are at a higher risk of poor survival through radiomics, an area of science that uses imaging, such as CT scans and MRIs, to uncover tumoral patterns and characteristics that may not be easy to spot by the naked eye.
Read more
Image: A small rectangular sensor in a petri dish is lying on the hand of a person; Copyright: Antonie Bierling/TUD

Antonie Bierling/TUD

Electronic noses to track down body odors

03/05/2022

Human body odor is influenced by diet, inflammatory processes, and hormone balance, among other factors, and consequently changes in body odor can provide clues to disease - sometimes much earlier than through currently established diagnostic methods.
Read more
Image: Depiction of a cochlea from yello and red dots on black backdrop; Copyright: umg/Institut für Auditorische Neurowissenschaften

umg/Institut für Auditorische Neurowissenschaften

Decoding the hearing: ERC grant for Tobias Moser

03/05/2022

Tobias Moser, MD, Director of the Institute for Auditory Neuroscience at the University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) was awarded an Advanced Grant of the European Research Council (ERC). The ERC supports his research project "Solving the dynamic range problem of hearing: deciphering and harnessing cochlear mechanisms of sound intensity coding (DynaHear)" over five years with 2,5 million euros.
Read more
Image:Male Doctor Examining MRI Brain Scan: Copyright: FabrikaPhoto

FabrikaPhoto

MRI identifies markers of atypical brain development in preterm children

02/05/2022

Premature babies who develop abnormalities like autism and cerebral palsy as teenagers have subtle differences in brain structure that can be detected on quantitative MRI (qMRI), according to a new study in the journal Radiology.
Read more
Image: Shandong Wu smiles at the camera; Copyright: UPMC

UPMC

Machine learning model can steer traumatic brain injury patients to life-saving care

28/04/2022

A prognostic model developed by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine data scientists and UPMC neurotrauma surgeons is the first to use automated brain scans and machine learning to inform outcomes in patients with severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI).
Read more
Image: Linear accelerator in oncological cancer therapy; Copyright: EdVal

EdVal

Radiation therapy: Weapon against tumours, boost for the immune system

27/04/2022

Radiation therapy is a proven approach to destroying tumours. However, it is possible that it might be able to do even more in the future – namely stimulate the immune system at the same time and so fight cancer even more intensively.
Read more
Image: Woman holding her stomach painfully ; Copyright: Prostock-studio

Prostock-studio

Nanoparticles show promise for locating, removing endometriosis lesions

25/04/2022

Scientists have developed a new nanotechnology approach for locating and removing the painful and dangerous lesions associated with endometriosis, a common gynecological condition in women of childbearing age.
Read more
Image: virtual illustration of a telerobotic surgical procedure : Copyright: MIT

MIT

Joystick-operated robot could help surgeons treat stroke remotely

21/04/2022

The system could provide teleoperated endovascular treatment to patients during the critical time window after a stroke begins.
Read more
Image: Professor Dr. Waldo Nogueira Vazquez presenting an EEG bonnet ; Copyright: Karin Kaiser/MHH

Karin Kaiser/MHH

Two million euros for new directions in hearing research

20/04/2022

Expert in hearing prosthetics receives renowned ERC funding award from the European Union.
Read more
Image: A CT device; Copyright: Pressmaster

Pressmaster

Tumors partially destroyed with sound don't come back

20/04/2022

Technique pioneered in rats at the University of Michigan could improve outcomes for cancer and neurological conditions.
Read more
Image: Gray scale image of tissue; Copyright: Referenz-Screening-Einheit Münster-Nord

Referenz-Screening-Einheit Münster-Nord

Breast tomosynthesis: Cancer detected more often than with standard mammography

19/04/2022

By now, breast cancer is the most frequent tumor disease worldwide. This is why in Germany women aged 50 and over are offered systematic early detection examinations – so-called mammography screening. The Clinic for Radiology at the University of Münster conducts research in the field of innovative imaging technologies and their impact on the efficiency of detecting breast cancer.
Read more
Image: Man sleeps with the sleeploop system on his head; Copyright: SleepLoop

SleepLoop

Enhancing deep sleep

14/04/2022

Many people, especially the elderly, suffer from abnormal sleep. In particular, the deep sleep phases become shorter and shallower with age.
Read more
Image: Colored 3D-model of parts of a cell; Copyright: University of Freiburg

University of Freiburg

Insights into the dynamic ultrastructure of the heart

12/04/2022

What happens below the cellular level when the heart contracts and relaxes has long been unexplored. Thanks to new ultra-high-resolution electron microscopy techniques, scientists can now watch the heart beating – almost at a molecular level.
Read more
Image: A round, flat, blue-violet disc in a petri dish; Copyright: TU Graz/Lunghammer

TU Graz/Lunghammer

Nerve stimulation with the help of implantable mini solar cells

12/04/2022

An international research team has successfully developed and tested a concept in which nerves are stimulated with light pulses. The method provides considerable advantages for medicine and opens up a wide range of possible applications.
Read more
Image: The hydrogel with entrapped kidney stone debris; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

Purenum GmbH

Using hydrogel to remove kidney stone fragments

11/04/2022

Kidney stones are often removed via an endoscopic procedure. If a stone is too large, the urologists break it into pieces using a laser. The larger pieces can be removed with a grasping instrument, but this is not possible for the smaller fragments – instead, they remain in the kidney in the hope that they will leave the body naturally.
Read more
Image: A laser microscope on a brain model; Copyright: Fraunhofer

Fraunhofer

A new laser scanning microscope improves cancer cell detection

11/04/2022

Fraunhofer researchers have developed a very fast technology for determining whether a tumor has been fully removed — before the patient even leaves the operating theater. Using a combination of laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent tumor markers, doctors can detect any remaining cancer cells immediately after operations.
Read more
Image: ECG Curves on Paper ; Copyright: PantherMedia  / animaxx3d

PantherMedia / radub85

Atrial fibrillation and dementia clearly associated

06/04/2022

For people with atrial fibrillation, one of our most common cardiac disorders, dementia risk is elevated. This is shown by a University of Gothenburg thesis based on research at population level.
Read more
Image: the robot AV1 at school; Copyright: Estera Kluczenko

Estera Kluczenko

Robotics: an avatar to end loneliness

18/12/2019

A child who has to miss many days of school due to long-term illness? An older adult living alone or in a nursing home? The Norwegian startup No Isolation believes that nobody should have to experience social isolation, no matter how old you are. The company uses technology to help combat loneliness.
Read more
Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
Read more
Image: elderly woman in a wheelchair showing a nurse something on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Smart care: safety and support thanks to AAL

02/12/2019

Average life expectancy keeps increasing, while birth rates are declining – at least when it comes to most industrial nations. The coming decades will see a decreasing number of gainfully employed people versus more and more senior citizens and people in need of care. It's a trend that already pushes healthcare to the brink. That's why we desperately need new concepts. One of them is AAL.
Read more
Image: elderly woman with a tablet on her lap; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Ambient Assisted Living: sensors for seniors

02/12/2019

Our ageing society is confronted with fewer and fewer workers. One of the many consequences is a shortage of skilled nursing staff. Ambient Assisted Living should solve this problem. By equipping the living environment of elderly people or people in need of care with (technical) assistance systems, they are to be given more self-determination and security. The nursing staff also benefits.
Read more
Image: several people standing around a bed with a stand-up function on which one person sits; Copyright: Ralf Lienert/Allgäuer Zeitung

AAL Living Lab: research, education and raising awareness

02/12/2019

Smart home systems are a perfect example of how technology can make our daily lives easier. The fact that they can use a tablet to adjust lighting and blinds in every room benefits older adults in more ways than one. These types of technical systems are a part of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) and create a safe living environment for older persons.
Read more
Image: Digital twin of the lungs; Copyright: Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

ARDS: Testing Consequences without Consequence

14/11/2019

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening illness in which the lungs are severely damaged. The condition always requires intensive medical care through mechanical ventilation. But not all lungs are the same. To ensure a personalized treatment that is adapted to the individual patient’s lung volume and condition, Ebenbuild relies on digital twins.
Read more
Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04/11/2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
Read more
Image: Connection of medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019: Experience tomorrow's innovations today

01/10/2019

The medical market is booming - medical ideas and visions for the future are more in demand than ever. Especially at MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019 young founders want to present their product innovations. Develop business contacts, meet investors and experience an international environment in just one place. Discover in our Topic of the Month what makes MEDICA START-UP PARK unique.
Read more
Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
Read more
Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01/10/2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
Read more
Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
Read more
Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
Read more
Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
Read more
Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
Read more
Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
Read more
Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
Read more
Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
Read more
Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01/07/2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
Read more
Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01/07/2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01/07/2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
Read more
Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24/06/2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
Read more
Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11/06/2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
Read more
Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03/06/2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
Read more
Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03/06/2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
Read more
Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
Read more
Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03/06/2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
Read more
Image: Hands in front of a computer and tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrew Lozovyi

Human firewall – keeping your resources safe

02/05/2019

Digitization impacts many areas of life. It is also remapping the healthcare landscape and is becoming increasingly important, ensuring that patients receive comprehensive care as quickly as possible. To make this a reality, data is stored digitally and medical devices are connected.
Read more
Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
Read more
Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
Read more
Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
Read more
Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
Read more
Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
Read more
Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
Read more
Image: Leg implants; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ monstArrr

panthermedia.net/ monstArrr

Orthopedic implant: More comfortable thanks to full weight-bearing capacity

08/03/2019

Orthopedic implants – they are a necessity when it comes to congenital or acquired limb length discrepancies. However, full weight-bearing during the limb lengthening process is not feasible with previous implant models. For the first time, the 3D Surgery division at the Medical Center of the University of Munich has succeeded in using an implant that facilitates immediate weight-bearing.
Read more
Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
Read more
Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01/03/2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
Read more
Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01/03/2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
Read more
Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01/03/2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
Read more
Image: Preemie doll with drug delivery system on the nose; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Gentle medication for the little ones – with every breath

22/02/2019

According to the WHO, ten percent of babies worldwide are born prematurely. Since most organs of these tiny babies have not fully developed yet, it can quickly lead to complications and disorders and most notably affect the lungs of the premature infants. What's more, infections require gentle treatment, as the preemies themselves are fragile and susceptible – making this a challenging situation.
Read more
Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19/12/2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
Read more
Image: Hand prostheses is squeezing a small ball; Copyright: Alina Kettenbach

Alina Kettenbach

SoftHand: grasping intelligence for lower arm prostheses

10/12/2018

So far, lower arm prostheses often only functioned as a cosmetic disguise to conceal the missing body part. While newer models help the wearer with grip patterns, every hand grip has to be readjusted and newly activated. There is still no prosthetic device that is easy to control and allows a flexible response to objects the wearer is grasping.
Read more
Image: Proband with a neuroprosthesis; Copyright: MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp – being able to grasp again with paraplegia

22/11/2018

Every year between 250.000 and 500.000 people suffer a spinal cord injury, MoreGrasp is intended to make their lives easier. The project aims to restore the lost gripping function in people with high paraplegia. Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a neuroprosthesis that is currently undergoing a feasibility study.
Read more
Image: the model of a kidney with gripping tools and the adhesive; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

Purenum GmbH

A clean kidney: Break then glue

08/11/2018

Not enough exercise, an unhealthy diet: Kidney stones develop when urine contains too many insoluble compounds and are now one of the most common diseases worldwide. The ailment annually affects 1.2 million people in Germany alone. The stones are broken up and taken out via endoscopic surgery. Now it’s possible to remove even the tiniest residual fragments. The solution: a biocompatible adhesive.
Read more
Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
Read more
Image: Small, black, oval device with a sensor for fingerprints; Copyright: NuvoAir AB

NuvoAir AB

Air Next: sharing spirometry data for better treatment

24/09/2018

Some diseases require close, permanent control of the patient, especially if they are chronic and, if unchecked, potentially dangerous, like some lung diseases. Monitoring them is quite cumbersome, because patients regularly need to visit their physician or a hospital. Wireless devices for home measurements offer at least some comfort and relieve to patients.
Read more
Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08/08/2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
Read more
Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23/07/2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
Read more
Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09/07/2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
Read more
Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
Read more
Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08/05/2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
Read more
Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23/04/2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
Read more
Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09/04/2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
Read more
Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
Read more
Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08/02/2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
Read more
Image:

Empa

"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08/01/2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
Read more