Stroke care: When every minute counts -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: 'Mini-brain' bioengineered from human stem cells; Copyright: Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT), Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Organoids suggest COVID-19 virus can infect human brain cells

02/07/2020

A multidisciplinary team from two Johns Hopkins University institutions, including neurotoxicologists and virologists from the Bloomberg School of Public Health and infectious disease specialists from the school of medicine, has found that organoids known as "mini-brains" can be infected by the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19.
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Biomarkers show clear signs of brain injury with severe COVID-19

23/06/2020

Certain patients who receive hospital care for coronavirus infection (COVID-19) exhibit clinical and neurochemical signs of brain injury, a University of Gothenburg study shows. In even moderate COVID-19 cases, finding and measuring a blood-based biomarker for brain damage proved to be possible.
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MRI test for football players could detect CTE

22/06/2020

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease caused by repeated head injuries often affecting athletes, can only be diagnosed currently through brain tissue analysis post-mortem. However, in a new study published in Brain, a Journal of Neurology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers present a new test methodology.
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Image: drawn picture of a brain; Copyright: Mindy Takamiya/Kyoto University iCeMS

AI enhances brain tumour diagnosis

12/06/2020

A new machine learning approach classifies a common type of brain tumour into low or high grades with almost 98 percent accuracy, researchers report in the journal IEEE Access. Scientists in India and Japan, including from Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, developed the method to help clinicians choose the most effective treatment strategy for individual patients.
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Ultra-thin fibers designed to protect nerves after brain surgery

05/06/2020

The drug nimodipine could prevent nerve cells from dying after brain surgery. Pharmacists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), in cooperation with neurosurgeons at University Hospital Halle (Saale) (UKH), have developed a new method that enables the drug to be administered directly in the brain with fewer side effects.
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Image: A young man with a bald head shows the scar of skull surgery; Copyright: PantherMedia/hplovecraft.mail.ru

Mapping immune cells in brain tumors with AI

04/06/2020

It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now been able to describe the composition of the immune cells of various types of brain tumors. This will provide an important foundation for future immunotherapy approaches.
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Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02.06.2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
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Mobile stroke units: improved outcomes for ischemic stroke

02/06/2020

If someone is having a stroke, you call an ambulance. But getting to the hospital can be time-consuming. To prevent long-term disabilities and death, patients need to be treated as quickly as possible. According to a recent study by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, mobile stroke units play a key role in this setting.
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Image: Female physician is looking a CT images of the brain next to a patient in an ICU bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

Comprehensive stroke care: faster, closer, better

02/06/2020

"Time is brain!" – a fundamental rule in stroke care because time is of the essence when brain regions are undersupplied with oxygen and glucose. If circulation is not restored quickly, brain damage can be permanent. However, the key point here is not just to "be fast", but also to "use the time to treat stroke effectively".
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02/06/2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: finger with a sensor + device applicated behind the ear to create the electrical pulses to stimulate the vagus nerve; Copyright: TU Wien

Nerve stimulation: electric impulses relieve the pain

29/05/2020

The vagus nerve plays an important role in our body. It consists of various fibres, some of which connect to the internal organs, but the vagus nerve can also be found in the ear. It is of great importance for various body functions, including the perception of pain. Therefore, a lot of research has been focussing on how the vagus nerve can be stimulated gently with special electrodes.
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Image: 7 weeks old human embryo surrounded by placenta; Copyright: Hill, M.A. (2020, May 18)

Unique insight into development of human brain

28/05/2020

Stem cell researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new research model of the early embryonic brain. The aim of the model is to study the very earliest stages of brain to understand how different regions in the brain are formed during embryonic development.
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Image: system for integrating artificial neurons; Copyright: Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Prosthesis: Artificial pieces of brain communicate with real neurons

20/05/2020

A prosthesis is an artificial device that replaces an injured or missing part of the body. You can easily imagine a stereotypical pirate with a wooden leg or Luke Skywalker's famous robotic hand. Less dramatically, think of old-school prosthetics like glasses and contact lenses that replace the natural lenses in our eyes. Now try to imagine a prosthesis that replaces part of a damaged brain.
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Image: Woman pointing at data on a monitor; Copyright: Nathan L. Galli, University of Utah

Pattern found in tumors predicts life expectancy

18/05/2020

For the past 70 years, the best indicator of life expectancy for a patient with glioblastoma (GBM) has simply been age at diagnosis. Now, an international team of scientists has experimentally validated a predictor that is not only more accurate but also more clinically relevant: a pattern of co-occurring changes in DNA abundance levels.
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Image: Graphic of a curve next to an icon for a youing and an old human and a human brain; Copyright: RIKEN

A new biomarker for the aging brain

15/05/2020

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified changes in the aging brain related to blood circulation. Published in the journal Brain, the study found that natural age-related enlargement of the ventricles - a condition called ventriculomegaly - was associated with a lag in blood drainage from a specific deep region of the brain.
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Image: A man with an exoskeleton at one leg is walking up stairs; Copyright: Rolex Awards/Fred Merz

Soft robotic exosuit makes stroke survivors walk faster and farther

15/05/2020

Research study in stroke survivors with chronic hemiparesis shows that soft exosuit technology can bring immediate improvements in walking speed and endurance tests.
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Image: A monkey touching a swith; Copyright: Michael Berger

Brain-computer interface: controlling your home by the power of thought

11/05/2020

Neuroscientists at the German Primate Center developed a new experimental environment to study action plans during walking.
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Image: grafic depiction of a brain with burst blood vessels; Copyright: PantherMedia/artemida psy

Day against Stroke 2020

10/05/2020

This year on 10.05.2020 the Day Against Stroke is being celebrated under the title "The digital helpers are coming!". A stroke is still one of the most frequent causes of death. Every year, around 270,000 people suffer a stroke in Germany alone.
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Image: two professors in the laboratory with the ultraviolet imaging devices; Copyright: University of Southampton

Extreme ultraviolet imaging to study Alzheimer's disease

06/05/2020

Scientists have published highly-detailed images of lab-grown neurons using Extreme Ultraviolet radiation that could aid the analysis of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Image: Computer-generated illustration of a neural cell; Copyright: PantherMedia/ktsdesign

Imaging: short nerve fibers made visible

24/04/2020

A team led by Nikolaus Weiskopf from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig has now succeeded in making short neuronal fibers visible in the living human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
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Image: Colorful groups of dots on black ground; Copyright: Chair Markus Sauer/University of Würzburg

Super-resolution microscopy brings insight into the synapses

21/04/2020

"Distance keeping" is not exactly the motto of the glutamate receptors: Using super-resolution microscopy, it now was discovered that the receptors usually appear in small groups at the synapses and are in contact with other proteins.
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Image: 3D image of the olfactory epithelium; Copyright: Hillman and Firestein labs

Tool helps researchers watch neural activity in 3D

14/04/2020

Our ability to study networks within the nervous system has been limited by the tools available to observe large volumes of cells at once. An ultra-fast, 3D imaging technique called SCAPE microscopy, developed through the NIH's BRAIN Initiative, allows a greater volume of tissue to be viewed in a way that is much less damaging to delicate networks of living cells.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24/06/2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11/06/2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Bild: Mann liegt auf dem Boden, vor ihm der mobile Roboter mit Tablet; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

MobiKa – programmed to help

22/05/2019

Many illnesses or old age require help with everyday tasks. Unfortunately, family members or caregivers aren’t always available to lend a hand. The MobiKa mobile service robot is designed to offer support, deliver motivation and improve the quality of life of those in need.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Brain stimulation: treatment using electric current and magnetic fields

03/12/2018

The treatment for many neurological and mental disorders is far from being an easy feat. Drug therapies always require accurate medication adjustments, while brain surgeries have the potential for risks and complications. Non-invasive brain stimulation takes a different approach: magnetic fields and electric current change the activities in the brain - without putting the patient at risk.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03/12/2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03/12/2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08/08/2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Neurology: Early detection of Parkinson’s disease with app and data?

01/08/2018

Big Data is often likened to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack: Large volumes of data contain patterns that hold the answer to a particular question. The trick is to gather meaningful data and identify patterns. The i-PROGNOSIS research project shows how smart devices and an app team up to automatically collect data without disturbing the user.
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Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: one of Fiagon's electromagnetic surgical navigation systems; Copyright: Fiagon

The surgeon's co-pilot: pin-point accuracy through electromagnetic navigation systems

04/01/2018

The position and alignment of surgical tools in the patient’s body must always be kept in view during the operation process to guarantee success and safety. With fine sensors at the tip of the instruments and an electromagnetic signal, Fiagon's electromagnetic navigation systems accurately reproduce their position in the body.
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