Stroke care: When every minute counts -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Electronic device that is connected to a laptop computer; Copyright: Daniel Fong, UC Davis

Non-invasive fetal oxygen monitor could make for safer deliveries

26/06/2020

A device to directly measure blood oxygen saturation in a fetus during labor has been developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis. By providing better information about the health of a fetus right before birth, the device could both reduce the rate of Cesarean sections and improve outcomes in difficult deliveries.
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Biomarkers show clear signs of brain injury with severe COVID-19

23/06/2020

Certain patients who receive hospital care for coronavirus infection (COVID-19) exhibit clinical and neurochemical signs of brain injury, a University of Gothenburg study shows. In even moderate COVID-19 cases, finding and measuring a blood-based biomarker for brain damage proved to be possible.
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Image: A computer-generated image of a blue device; Copyright: POLI-USP

Brazilian researchers develop low-cost mechanical ventilators

03/06/2020

A group of researchers at the University of São Paulo's Engineering School (POLI-USP) in Brazil have developed a mechanical ventilator that costs only approximately 7% as much as a conventional ventilator. Called Inspire, it has an open patent allowing royalty-free manufacturing, although as a life support device, its distribution is controlled.
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Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02.06.2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
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Image: Female physician is looking a CT images of the brain next to a patient in an ICU bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

Comprehensive stroke care: faster, closer, better

02/06/2020

"Time is brain!" – a fundamental rule in stroke care because time is of the essence when brain regions are undersupplied with oxygen and glucose. If circulation is not restored quickly, brain damage can be permanent. However, the key point here is not just to "be fast", but also to "use the time to treat stroke effectively".
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Image: A plastic bag is filled with a transparent fluid; Copyright: Johns Hopkins Medicine

New method to make kidney dialysis fluid for patients with COVID-19

01/06/2020

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted the manufacturing and supply chains for many products. But while shortages of toilet paper, disinfectant cleaners and hand sanitizer get most of the news coverage, the diminishing reserve of one item - kidney dialysis fluid, also known as dialysate - presents a grave threat to the lives of people with acute kidney injury (AKI).
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Image: Physician in white scrubs standing next to a medical device - Dr. Chris McIntyre; Copyright: Lawson Health Research Institute

Canadian team first in world to treat COVID-19 with specialized dialysis

13/05/2020

As part of a randomized controlled trial, a team from Lawson Health Research Institute is the first in the world to treat a patient with COVID-19 using a modified dialysis device. The device gently removes a patient's blood, modifies white blood cells and returns them to fight hyperinflammation. It is being tested with critically ill patients at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC).
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COVID-19: kidney inflammation as early warning sign for severe course

13/05/2020

Scientists from the University Medical Center Goettingen develop a conceivable course of action for patients with COVID-19 infections to predict severity of systemic disease and complications. Published online in The Lancet.
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Image: A mechanical ventilator bag with a control device; Copyright: Mechanical Ventilator Milano

Physicists design FDA-approved, open-source ventilator

11/05/2020

As the spread of COVID-19 sparked a global search for ventilators to help critically ill patients, an international collaboration of particle physicists and engineers pivoted to design a mechanical ventilator made from readily available components.
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Image: Two people showing an emergency ventilation device consisting of an oxygen bottle and a balloon; Copyright: Dr. Robert Szlosarek

TU Bergakademie Freiberg develops new ways of emergency ventilation

24/04/2020

Scientists at TU Bergakademie Freiberg are currently testing a prototype of a pressure-controlled emergency ventilator. The device, which can be built with simple tools and is easy to maintain, could be used primarily in developing countries for the ventilation of emergency patients suffering from lung diseases.
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Image: A pile of transparent plastic boxes; Copyright: West Virginia University

COVID-19: intubation boxes help reduce risk to clinicians

21/04/2020

A global pandemic, a worried wife and a campus that, like its home state, is full of connections, were the impetus for protective devices that were created at West Virginia University and are now being used by a variety of health care professionals at WVU Medicine J. W. Ruby Memorial Hospital.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Ambulances of the future – a safe and ergonomic workplace

19/07/2018

Today's ambulance features far more technology than meets the eye. But not everything is aimed at treating patients. Ambulance manufacturers must also ensure that their vehicles make a great workplace for the crews on board and can adapt to the different challenges of emergency medical services.
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The perfect bone fracture - MEDICA 2018

19/07/2018

Studies show that young trauma surgeons are allowed to operate immediately after completing their training, but have not necessarily practiced as often as mandatorily required. And that even though training Doctors could take place without putting the patients in any danger - on realistic preparations in training centers.
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The path to the Digi-Doc – MEDICA 2018

19/07/2018

The electronic patient record is only one of many examples that shows how difficult digitization is in the healthcare industry in Germany. So it is no wonder that this topic will dominate at MEDICA, the world's largest medical trade fair. At the same time, the suppliers of medical technology present themselves.
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Image: An ambulance is driving on a long, wet motorway; Copyright: panthermedia.net/BrianAJackson

Emergency medicine: how telemedicine strengthens the chain of survival

02/07/2018

You have probably heard of the chain of survival. It refers to a series of collaborative actions taken by first responders, emergency response systems, and emergency departments to ensure emergency medical services. However, at times, this chain of survival is too long when emergency vehicles have to travel great distances for example.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08/05/2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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