AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: someone taking measurements with Photomedas of a skull via smartphone; Copyright: RUVID

mHealth: measuring cranial deformation with a mobile phone

05.09.2019

Photomedas. This is the name of a non-invasive system that will help measure the cranial deformation of infants – from newborns, to 12-month-old babies. It is comprised of a mobile phone application and a mesh cap, and has been developed by Valencia Polytechnic University (UPV) researchers together with La Fe hospital specialists.
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Image: Illustration of the three brain regions associated with speech production; Copyright: Northwestern University

fMRI: map of broken brain networks shows why people lose speech

03.09.2019

For the first time, Northwestern Medicine scientists have pinpointed the location of dysfunctional brain networks that lead to impaired sentence production and word finding in primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a form of dementia in which patients often lose their language rather than their memory or thought process.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02.09.2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02.09.2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02.09.2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02.09.2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Sports medicine: Neuromuscular training for optimal performance

20.08.2019

Movement, strength and coordination - after injuries as well as in healthy athletes, these three components must be intact for movements to run smoothly. At the Beta Klinik in Bonn, Dr. Markus Klingenberg, a specialist in orthopaedics, trauma surgery and sports medicine, offers neuromuscular training with a playful character that can be adapted to the patient's needs.
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Image: woman in a lab coat and disposable gloves choosing a sample from the brain bank; Copyright: UC Davis Health

AI: mapping the brain landscape for Alzheimer's disease

16.08.2019

A team of researchers lead by Brittany Dugger of UC Davis Health has been awarded a $3.8 million grant from the National Institute for Aging (NIA) to help define the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease in Hispanic cohorts.
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Image: illustration of nanodestructive characterization of stem cell differentiation through exosomal miRNA detection; Copyright: Jin-Ho Lee/Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Nanotechnology: better stem cell transplantation research

15.08.2019

Nanotechnology developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick could boost research on stem cell transplantation, which may help people with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, other neurodegenerative diseases and central nervous system injuries.
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Image: Man who supports sadly his head in his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kmiragaya

Brain stimulation: help for PTSD patients

13.08.2019

For 8-million adults who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder in any given year, medication and cognitive therapy have been the treatment protocol.
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Image: PET imaging using the radiotracers FDG and florbetapir for analysis; Copyright: Penn Medicine

Imaging: brain's glucose consumption as a marker

08.08.2019

While the presence of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain may be a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, giving patients an amyloid PET scan is not an effective method for measuring their cognitive function, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Thomas Jefferson University.
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Image: The signalling protein Fyn moving and forming clusters in living brain cells - viewed using super-resolution microscopy.; Copyright: Meunier Lab, University of Queensland

Dementia: Super-resolution microscopy sheds light

05.08.2019

University of Queensland researchers have used super-resolution microscopy to observe key molecules at work inside living brain cells, further unravelling the puzzle of memory formation and the elusive causes of dementia.
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Image: Man who had a stroke might be treated with thrombectomy; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olegdudko

Thrombectomy: potential treatment for larger strokes

31.07.2019

Building on research results published today in JAMA Neurology showing patients with larger ischemic strokes could benefit from endovascular thrombectomy, an international, multicenter Phase III clinical trial will be starting at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
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Image: hands holding a head model with the smart brain stimulators; Copyright: University of Houston

Brain stimulators: next-gen Parkinson's disease therapy

31.07.2019

Researchers at the University of Houston have found neuro biomarkers for Parkinson's disease that can help create the next generation of "smart" deep brain stimulators, able to respond to specific needs of Parkinson's disease patients.
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Image: man with a wearable on his ear; Copyright: University of Leeds

Wearables: 'tickle' therapy could help slow ageing

30.07.2019

'Tickling' the ear with a small electrical current appears to rebalance the autonomic nervous system for over-55s, potentially slowing down one of the effects of ageing, according to new research. Scientists found that a short daily therapy delivered for two weeks led to both physiological and wellbeing improvements, including a better quality of life, mood and sleep.
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Image: sensors controle wirelessly muscle signal transmittion; Copyright: Medical University of Vienna

Prosthetics: sensors for wireless control of muscle signals

23.07.2019

For the first time in the world, the research group led by Oskar Aszmann from MedUni Vienna's Department of Surgery, working with commercial partner Otto Bock Healthcare Products and a development group in the USA (Alfred Mann Foundation), has successfully implanted sensors in three male patients following nerve transfers, to transmit biosignals for wireless control of robotic arms.
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Image: Woman with migraine; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rinderart

Free head, without pain - World Brain Day 2019

19.07.2019

World Brain Day 2019 is on July 22. It was created by the World Federation of Neurology (WFN) and the International Headache Society (IHS) to help people pay more attention to neurological diseases. This year the focus will be on migraine - a painful disease that seriously affects people in their daily lives.
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Image: A man with glasses, a beard and a white shirt in front of a window; Copyright: Fraunhofer IDMT/Hannes Kalter

Neurology: hearing expert receives grant

18.07.2019

Dr. Jan Rennies-Hochmuth has been awarded a grant from the "Klaus Tschira Boost Fund" for his outstanding research. He is working on the development of personalized hearing systems for improved speech communication at the Hearing, Speech and Audio Technology Division (HSA) of the Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT in Oldenburg.
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Image: Five players of American Football tackling each other; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Football: wearables monitor consequences of head impacts

18.07.2019

In a prospective study of children playing tackle football, researchers find minimal changes in neurocognitive outcomes - and any changes were not correlated to number or severity of head impacts.
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Image: A drawn image of the human spine with a hole in it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

Nanotechnology: an 'EpiPen' for spinal cord injuries

15.07.2019

An injection of nanoparticles can prevent the body's immune system from overreacting to trauma, potentially preventing some spinal cord injuries from resulting in paralysis. The approach was demonstrated in mice at the University of Michigan, with the nanoparticles enhancing healing by reprogramming the aggressive immune cells.
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01.07.2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Detailed video-based recording of the movement of all finger joints of a hand when gripping an object; Copyright: Swathi Sheshadri

AI: recognizing pathological movement patterns

28.06.2019

Reliably evaluating walking and gripping movements of patients is essential for the diagnosis and therapy of movement disorders, for example after a stroke or in Parkinson's syndromes. However, the success of this challenging diagnostic procedure depends to a large extent on the experience and skills of the attending physician.
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Image: hospital behind palm trees; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

AI could be 'game changer' in detecting and managing Alzheimer's disease

27.06.2019

Worldwide, about 44 million people are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or a related form of dementia. Although 82 percent of seniors in the United States say it's important to have their thinking or memory checked, only 16 percent say they receive regular cognitive assessments.
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24.06.2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: A young blond woman sitting on the floor next to mirror images of herself; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis

20.06.2019

A machine-learning method discovered a hidden clue in people's language predictive of the later emergence of psychosis - the frequent use of words associated with sound. A paper published by the journal npj Schizophrenia published the findings by scientists at Emory University and Harvard University.
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Image: Logo of brainlife.io; Copyright: brainlife.io

Cloud-computing web platform for neuroscience research

19.06.2019

Scientists in the United States, Europe and South America are reporting how a new cloud-computing web platform allows scientists to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery. The project, called brainlife.io, is led by Franco Pestilli, associate professor at Indiana University, in collaboration with colleagues across the university.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11.06.2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03.06.2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03.06.2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03.06.2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08.04.2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01.04.2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: Hand prostheses is squeezing a small ball; Copyright: Alina Kettenbach

SoftHand: grasping intelligence for lower arm prostheses

10.12.2018

So far, lower arm prostheses often only functioned as a cosmetic disguise to conceal the missing body part. While newer models help the wearer with grip patterns, every hand grip has to be readjusted and newly activated. There is still no prosthetic device that is easy to control and allows a flexible response to objects the wearer is grasping.
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Image: A young boy who is wearing a medical device on his head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ahfoto.mail.ru

Brain stimulation: treatment using electric current and magnetic fields

03.12.2018

The treatment for many neurological and mental disorders is far from being an easy feat. Drug therapies always require accurate medication adjustments, while brain surgeries have the potential for risks and complications. Non-invasive brain stimulation takes a different approach: magnetic fields and electric current change the activities in the brain - without putting the patient at risk.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03.12.2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Image: Proband with a neuroprosthesis; Copyright: MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp – being able to grasp again with paraplegia

22.11.2018

Every year between 250.000 and 500.000 people suffer a spinal cord injury, MoreGrasp is intended to make their lives easier. The project aims to restore the lost gripping function in people with high paraplegia. Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a neuroprosthesis that is currently undergoing a feasibility study.
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Image: Older couple is sitting next to each other, using their smartphones; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Fabrice Michaudeau

Neurology: Early detection of Parkinson’s disease with app and data?

01.08.2018

Big Data is often likened to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack: Large volumes of data contain patterns that hold the answer to a particular question. The trick is to gather meaningful data and identify patterns. The i-PROGNOSIS research project shows how smart devices and an app team up to automatically collect data without disturbing the user.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08.03.2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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