With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Computer-generated image showing round viruses with spikes; Copyright: PantherMedia/Sanda Stanca

Blood test could identify COVID-19 patients at risk of hyperinflammation

22/10/2020

A new study jointly led by Professor Tom Wilkinson and Dr Tristan Clark of the University of Southampton, has shown a blood test for five cytokines could help predict those at risk of life-threating overstimulation of immune defenses by COVID-19, and potentially tailor their treatment to tackle this.
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Image: A female researcher is sitting in front of a microscope in a laboratory; Copyright: Andreas Heddergott/TUM

Fighting corona with machine learning

21/10/2020

The Technical University of Munich (TUM) is starting five new research projects that focus on the coronavirus and the search for new active ingredients. For example, the use of algorithms could ensure a more precise classification of the illness in the future.
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Image: A female researcher is working at a device in a laboratory; Copyright: Chris Richards/University of Arizona

Funding to advance device for detecting COVID-19, cancer, contaminants

21/10/2020

In Judith Su's Little Sensor Lab, researchers are working to sense tiny amounts - down to a single molecule - of everything from doping agents to biomarkers for cancer, Alzheimer's disease, Lyme disease and, yes, even COVID-19.
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Image: Three female researchers are working in a laboratory; Copyright: John W. Braun Jr., USAMRIID VIO

Army researchers collaborate on universal antibody test for COVID-19

20/10/2020

Researchers with the U.S. Army Futures Command are part of a team that tested alternative ways to measure COVID-19 antibody levels, resulting in a process that is faster, easier and less expensive to use on a large scale. Their method holds promise for accurately identifying potential donors who have the best chance of helping infected patients through convalescent plasma therapy.
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Image: A man and a woman wearing protective clothing work in the laboratory; Copyright: University of Nevada, Reno

COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results

19/10/2020

Rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in about 30 seconds following the test, has had successful preliminary results in Mano Misra's lab at the University of Nevada, Reno. The test uses a nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor, a similar technology that Misra has used in the past for detecting tuberculosis and colorectal cancer as well as detection of biomarkers for food safety.
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Image: graphic shows links between inflammation and Parkinson's disease; Copyright: University Of Luxembourg

Links between inflammation and Parkinson's disease

16/10/2020

Around 15 percent of Parkinson's disease cases are related to a known genetic background, out of which mutations in the Parkin and PINK1 genes are among the most frequent ones. Thus, revealing cellular mechanisms which are altered by these mutations is crucial for the development of new therapeutic approaches.
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Image: heart cells; Copyright: Disease Biophysics Group/Harvard SEAS

Reviving cells after a heart attack

16/10/2020

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) - nanometer sized messengers that travel between cells to deliver cues and cargo - are promising tools for the next generation of therapies for everything from autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases to cancer and tissue injury.
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Image: blood in testing tubes; Copyright: PantherMedia / Kiyoshi Takahase Segundo

Blood test developed for brain tumors

15/10/2020

Genetic mutations that promote the growth of the most common type of adult brain tumors can be accurately detected and monitored in blood samples using an enhanced form of liquid biopsy developed by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).
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Image: view into cells; Copyright: Alexandre Kitching

Virtual reality software allows scientists to 'walk' inside cells

13/10/2020

Virtual reality software which allows researchers to 'walk' inside and analyse individual cells could be used to understand fundamental problems in biology and develop new treatments for disease.
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Image: MRI breast scan; Copyright: Brindle Lab, University of Cambridge

Imaging technique could replace tissue biopsies

07/10/2020

Imaging techniques could replace the need for invasive tissue biopsies in helping rapidly determine whether cancer treatments are working effectively, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.
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Image: dry blood sample card in laboratory; Copyright: University of Birmingham

COVID-19: dried blood spot sampling

07/10/2020

Using dried blood spot samples (DBS) is an accurate alternative to venous blood in detecting SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests, a new study by immunology experts at the University of Birmingham has found.
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Image: CT images of a bone; Copyright: ARRS, AJR

Imaging: dual-energy CT

06/10/2020

Dual-energy CT adds value to routine interpretation of emergency department imaging studies by increasing radiologists’ diagnostic confidence, leading to a reduction in downstream imaging and associated costs.
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Image: depiction of sensor for COVID-19; Copyright: Caltech

Sensor that rapidly detects COVID-19 infection

05/10/2020

One feature of the COVID-19 virus that makes it so difficult to contain is that it can be easily spread to others by a person who has yet to show any signs of infection. The carrier of the virus might feel perfectly well and go about their daily business–taking the virus with them to work, to the home of a family member, or to public gatherings.
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Image: Chemical waves of protein activation ; Copyright: Tsuyoshi Hirashima

Wound-healing waves

01/10/2020

Many cells in our bodies are on the move and somehow seem to "know" where to go. But how do they learn the location of their destination? This question is key to understanding phenomena such as the renewal of cells in our body, the migration of cancer cells, and especially how wounds heal.
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Image: A screenshot of MarrowQuant annotating a bone marrow trephine biopsy from a patient surfing from chemotherapy-induced aplasia.; Copyright: Olaia Naveiras (EPFL)

MarrowQuant: a new digital-pathology tool

30/09/2020

The bone marrow is the soft tissue inside our bones. Its main role is to produce stem cells that will go on to become various cells of the blood, including white blood cells that fight infections, red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout the body, and platelets that control bleeding.
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Image: UT Dallas researchers designed a prototype of a wristwatch-like device that detects two key biomarkers associated with inflammatory bowel disease.; Copyright: University of Texas at Dallas

Wearable: sensor for people with inflammatory bowel disease

29/09/2020

University of Texas at Dallas researchers have designed a wearable device that monitors sweat for biomarkers that could signal flare-ups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). A sensor in the device detects and quantifies the presence of two key biomarkers associated with inflammatory bowel disease: interleukin-1β and C-reactive protein (CRP).
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Image: 3D printed nasal swabs; Copyright: USF Health|University of South Florida

3D printed nasal swabs for COVID-19 diagnostic testing

28/09/2020

As COVID-19 quickly spread worldwide this spring, shortages of supplies, including the nasopharyngeal (nasal) swabs used to collect viral samples, limited diagnostic testing.
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Image: lung model; Copyright: La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Lungs: a step toward helping patients breathe deeply

25/09/2020

Damaged lungs can't open properly. Patients with asthma, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis suffer from fibrosis and tissue remodeling, where a build-up of tissue and immune cells, and proteins that form a glue-like substance, keep the airways from expanding. As fibrosis gets worse, taking a breath feels like blowing up a balloon filled with concrete.
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Image: three people standing in a laboratory setting; Copyright: Stefan Zimmerman

COVID-19: cheaper and faster testing

24/09/2020

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a method for fast, cheap, yet accurate testing for COVID-19 infection. The method simplifies and frees the testing from expensive reaction steps, enabling upscaling of the diagnostics. This makes the method particularly attractive for places and situations with limited resources.
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Image: MRI scan of a knee; Copyright: Kundu et al. (2020) PNAS

AI detects osteoarthritis years before it develops

22/09/2020

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Carnegie Mellon University College of Engineering have created a machine-learning algorithm that can detect subtle signs of osteoarthritis - too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist - on an MRI scan taken years before symptoms even begin.
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Image: human skull with puzzle optic missing a piece; Copyright: PantherMedia / vampy1

Alteration in the brain of people with Alzheimer's

21/09/2020

Despite the important advances in research in recent years, the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is still not fully clarified. One of the key questions is to decipher why the production of beta amyloid, the protein that produces the toxic effect and triggers the pathology, increases in the brain of people with Alzheimer's.
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Image: Two researchers working in a laboratory with bags of blood plasma; Copyright: Houston Methodist

Study takes us a step closer to a universal antibody test for COVID-19

18/09/2020

A new study released by Houston Methodist takes researchers a significant step closer to developing a uniform, universal COVID-19 antibody test. The multicenter collaboration tested alternative ways to measure COVID-19 antibody levels that is faster and easier.
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Image: Illustration of tumor growth; Copyright: Kemal Avican

How prostate cancer causes secondary tumors

04/09/2020

An increased awareness on a molecular level of what mechanisms prostate cancer cells use to become mobile and start spreading may in the long run provide new opportunities for treatment of aggressive prostate cancer. This according to a new study by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, in collaboration with researchers in Uppsala and Tokyo.
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Image: tattoo ink color palette; Copyright: Zavaleta Lab at USC

Finding cancer using tattoo ink

03/09/2020

The humble ink in a tattoo artist's needle could be the key to improving the detection of cancer, thanks to new research from the USC Viterbi Department of Biomedical Engineering. WiSE Gabilan assistant professor in the department with a lab at the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, Cristina Zavaleta and her team recently developed new imaging contrast agents using common dyes.
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Image: flexible X-ray scintillator; Copyright: Biwu Ma / Florida State University

New X-ray detection technology developed

01/09/2020

Florida State University researchers have developed a new material that could be used to make flexible X-ray detectors that are less harmful to the environment and cost less than existing technologies.
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Image: View into an automated laboratory machine that stores a lot of vials; Copyright: PantherMedia/kagemusha

The smart networking laboratory: when connected devices become one system

01/09/2020

Diagnostics, biomedical research, screening active ingredient candidates - laboratories perform many functions and must be flexible. Growing and evolving healthcare demands mean labs have to process an increasing number of samples. Modern laboratory information management systems can already support high-throughput, but a smart laboratory environment can make things even more efficient.
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Image: Two woman sitting down and talking; Copyright: ATS

COVID-19: asthma may not be a significant risk factor

31/08/2020

A new research letter published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines whether asthma is a significant risk factor for developing COVID-19 that is severe enough to warrant hospitalization and intubation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals with asthma are at higher risk for hospitalization and other severe effects from COVID-19.
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Image: A device that analyzes antibodies and displays the results in form of lit points; Copyright: Timothy Abram

UCI develops low-cost, accurate COVID-19 antibody detection platform

26/08/2020

A robust, low-cost imaging platform utilizing lab-on-a-chip technology created by University of California, Irvine scientists may be available for rapid coronavirus diagnostic and antibody testing throughout the nation by the end of the year.
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Image: man during a breathalyzer test; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Popov

Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test

20/08/2020

Few people who have undergone nasopharyngeal swabs for coronavirus testing would describe it as a pleasant experience. The procedure involves sticking a long swab up the nose to collect a sample from the back of the nose and throat, which is then analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).
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Image: colored graphic of four spike proteins of SARS-CoV-2; Copyright: MPI for Biophysics, Frankfurt/Main

SARS-CoV-2: spike protein more flexible than anticipated

19/08/2020

To combat the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, research has been stepped up in search of new vaccines and treatments. To enter the cells, the virus needs the spike protein on its surface. Researchers of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut in co-operation with some research groups in Germany have analyzed the spike protein in its natural environment using high resolution imaging and computer-assisted methods.
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Image: Color map showing the amount of time a free-falling 100-micron droplet at an initial height of 1.6 meters is affected by temperature and humidity; Copyright: Binbin Wang

COVID-19: humid air can extend lifetime of virus-laden aerosol droplets

19/08/2020

The novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread through natural respiratory activities, such as breathing, talking and coughing, but little is known about how the virus is transported through the air.
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Image: MRI brain scan; Copyright: Shinsuke Koike, CC-BY

Mental healthcare: diagnosis via brain scan and computer algorithm

17/08/2020

Yet, there is currently no blood or genetic test, or impartial procedure that can definitively diagnose a mental illness, and certainly none to distinguish between different psychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. Experts are combining machine learning with brain imaging tools to redefine the standard for diagnosing mental illnesses.
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Image: Examples of sound features; Copyright: KAIST

Detecting the location of coughing sounds with deep learning

14/08/2020

The Center for Noise and Vibration Control at KAIST announced that their coughing detection camera recognizes where coughing happens, visualizing the locations. The resulting cough recognition camera can track and record information about the person who coughed, their location, and the number of coughs on a real-time basis.
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Image: laser beam in a microscopy system; Copyright: Yang Li, Terence T. W. Wong, Junhui Shi, Hsun-Chia Hsu, and Lihong V. Wang

Microscopy system enabling broader biomedical applications

13/08/2020

Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy is a powerful imaging tool with a superb ability to image rich optical absorption contrast in biological tissue. Most OR-PAM systems today rely on mechanical scanning to form an image, which restrains their imaging speed. To overcome the restraint, multifocal OR-PA computed tomography had been developed.
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Image: spinal cord osmotic therapy device; Copyright: Victor Rodgers/UC Riverside

Spinal cord injuries treatment improvement

13/08/2020

When injured, the spinal cord swells, restricting blood flow, resulting in further, often critical and permanent motor, sensory, and autonomic function damage. Rapid prevention of spinal cord swelling immediately after injury is key to preventing more serious damage. The only treatment to date has been steroid therapy with methylprednisolone, which is minimally effective.
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Gut enzyme could lead to new disease biomarker

12/08/2020

Enzymes used by bacteria to break down mucus in the gut could provide a useful biomarker for intestinal diseases, according to new research published in Nature Communications. Researchers at the University of Birmingham and Newcastle University have successfully identified and characterised one of the key enzymes involved in this process.
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Image: premature baby in an incubator; Copyright: Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

Machine learning tool predicts intestinal disease in premature infants

11/08/2020

Researchers from Columbia Engineering and the University of Pittsburgh have developed a sensitive and specific early warning system for predicting NEC in premature infants before the disease occurs. The prototype predicts NEC accurately and early, using stool microbiome features combined with clinical and demographic information.
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Image: Smartwatch on a wrist; Copyright: Jialun Zhu, Shuyu Lin, and Yichao Zhao (I²BL/UCLA)

Smartwatch tracks medication levels

10/08/2020

Engineers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and their colleagues at Stanford School of Medicine have demonstrated that drug levels inside the body can be tracked in real time using a custom smartwatch that analyzes the chemicals found in sweat. This wearable technology could be incorporated into a more personalized approach to medicine.
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Analyses of genome data enables tracking of avian influenza viruses

10/08/2020

An international consortium succeeded in tracking the genesis and spread of new reassortants of avian influenza viruses by the use of mathematical analyses. This large-scale international study has now been published in the scientific journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America).
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Image: woman in the laboratory; Copyright: RUB, Marquard

Sars-Cov-2: rapid test for the determination of antibodies

31/07/2020

To determine immunity to Sars-Cov-2 and the effectiveness of potential vaccines, the amount of neutralising antibodies in the blood of recovered or vaccinated individuals must be determined. A traditional neutralisation test usually takes two to three days and must be carried out with infectious coronaviruses in a laboratory complying to biosafety level 3.
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Image: blood-brain barrier dysfunction under hypoxia; Copyright: WFIRM

Organoids: inflammation induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction

30/07/2020

The scientists who developed the first 3D multicellular brain organoid with a functional blood brain barrier now report that the model could be a promising platform to screen drugs that could work to control inflammation, which is at the center of many neurological conditions, like ischemic stroke.
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Image: graphic representation of the miniature optics inside a vein; Copyright: Florian Sterl, Sterltech Optics

Endoscopy: images from the inside of blood vessels

29/07/2020

Researchers of the Universities of Stuttgart and Adelaide in cooperation with medical research centers in Australia developed a special microoptical tool with a thickness of only 125 microns. This enables endoscopic examimations within blood vessels whose diameter is smaller than 0.5 mm and helps detecting plaques or thrombs to reduce the danger of a stroke or a heart attack.
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Image: woman with face mask holding a smartphone with the corona tracking app; Copyright: PantherMedia/Arne Trautmann

Coronavirus: tracking symptoms with app an inexact predictor of infection

28/07/2020

A new piece in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that tracking symptoms affiliated with the novel coronavirus through an app may not be a good predictor of the spread of the disease.
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Image: detail of the new endoscopic device with protection against COVID-19; Copyright: Hiroyuki Endo

Endoscopy: new device provides added protection against COVID-19

27/07/2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown up unimaginable challenges for healthcare workers. Even simple outpatient procedures such as endoscopies can expose staff to the risk of infection. However, a team of researchers has developed a simple, disposable, and inexpensive device to provide an additional barrier of protection for healthcare workers performing esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD).
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Image: Schema of novel cancer tissue diagnosis in comparison with usual diagnosis; Copyright: Osaka University

Tissue imaging system accelerates cancer diagnosis

27/07/2020

Cancer diagnosis requires a lengthy process of multiple analyses of tissue biopsies, impeding the quick and early detection of cancers. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University developed a novel imaging system that uses near-infrared light to be less invasive and more time efficient than the conventional approach.
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Image: Two people wearing protective suits stand next to a workbench in a laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Foto Bernd Müller

epiLab: Coronavirus testing in the mobile safety laboratory

08/07/2020

A key to preventing SARS-CoV-2 spread is frequent, comprehensive testing. This allows the early detection of infections and helps break the chain of infection. It always comes down to Coronavirus testing capacity. In Germany's southwest state of Saarland, the mobile epiLab (epidemiological laboratory) supports the search for infections lurking in nursing homes and long-term care facilities.
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Image: man running in a lane on a sports field; Copyright: PantherMedia/stetsik

A Safe Return to Sports amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

22/06/2020

After professional sports and other sporting activities had been drastically limited to prevent COVID-19 spread, training facilities are now reopening to welcome recreational and competitive athletes. However, due to the ongoing pandemic, restrictions are still in place to lower the risk of human infection. EFSMA presents recommendations on a uniform approach to keeping athletes safe.
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02/06/2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: Transmission of medical data of an athlete to a laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia / Viktor Cap

Sports medicine software: Monitoring at the push of a button

22/05/2020

Athletes not only have to be fit and stay in shape, but they also have to achieve peak performance, especially when they get ready for athletic events. Optimized and individualized performance training requires data from external laboratories and institutes. The [i/med] Sports platform from DORNER Health IT Solutions provides a complete workflow − from anamnesis to diagnostic report.
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Image: Smiling man is standing in nature with one had at his ear; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cristalov

In-ear sensors for monitoring vital parameters

22/04/2020

Wearables offer practical solutions for the flexible measurement of data. The sensor from cosinuss° is worn directly in the ear and offers a precise monitoring of vital parameters.
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Image: young woman makes an ultrasound with the new system and shows patient the image on her smartphone; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Ultrasound to go: versatile partner on hospital rounds

08/04/2020

The University Hospital Bonn has recently introduced an ultrasound device that's small enough to fit in your coat pocket. It's ready to use once you have connected it to a tablet or smartphone. The portable system makes bedside physical exams possible. The device primarily benefits students as it allows them to combine basic knowledge and clinical application.
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Image: man holding his finger to the smartphone camera; Copyright: FibriCheck

Smartphone app detects cardiac arrhythmia

03/03/2020

Atrial fibrillation is one of the causes for a stroke and often appears without any previous indications. To reduce the risks and provide fast results, the application FibriCheck was invented. With the app it is possible to collect and measure data via smartphone camera.
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Image: Man sitting next to an older woman wearing vr glasses on a couch; Copyright: panthermedia.net/draoscondreaw

Sensor-Based Smart Glove Enables Parkinson's Diagnosis

25/02/2020

Neurological disorders like Parkinson's are often diagnosed once the disease has already progressed to a later stage. The VAFES project was initiated to facilitate an early detection. Sensor technology and VR are used in the creation of a playful test system.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03/02/2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22/01/2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A physician is standing in front of a floating image of the brain and is touching one point; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Igor Vetushko

Medicine 5.0: machine learning algorithms in healthcare

04/11/2019

Artificial intelligence holds the promise of salvation when it comes to medicine: it is meant to unburden medical professionals, save time and money and perform tasks reliably and tirelessly. But before AI algorithms are allowed to diagnose diseases, many technical and ethical questions still need answers.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Image: two athletes at the startline for a race; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22/10/2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01/10/2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Connection of medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019: Experience tomorrow's innovations today

01/10/2019

The medical market is booming - medical ideas and visions for the future are more in demand than ever. Especially at MEDICA START-UP PARK 2019 young founders want to present their product innovations. Develop business contacts, meet investors and experience an international environment in just one place. Discover in our Topic of the Month what makes MEDICA START-UP PARK unique.
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Image: A biker is riding on rocky ground in a steppe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

Triathlete Sebastian Kienle: wearables and body awareness improve athletic performance

09/09/2019

A 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20 km) run – that’s the Ironman Triathlon. Triathletes like Sebastian Kienle are constantly working to push beyond their limits. At the 7th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE on November 20 - 21, you can meet Kienle in person.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01/08/2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01/07/2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01/07/2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01/07/2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23/04/2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01/03/2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01/03/2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Hybrid Imaging – Two Views of the Lungs

25/01/2019

CT scan, MRI or X-ray: All these methods allow doctors to see inside the body - including inside the lungs - and make a diagnosis. The clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital uses a state-of-the-art gamma camera that combines SPECT and CT.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19/12/2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15/11/2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Interview with ERBA Diagnostics Mannheim GmbH

15/11/2018

A lot of answers in medicine are found in the laboratory. Correct analysis is key to find the right diagnosis and cure for the patient. We learn more about innovative analysis devices at the stand of ERBA Diagnostics at MEDICA 2018.
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Interview with MedicalTek Co., Ltd.

15/11/2018

Many diagnostic and treatment questions can be answered with a glance inside the body. At the MedicalTek stand at MEDICA 2018, we learn how imaging systems in minimally invasive surgery can help physicians.
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Diagnosis in HD – Imaging at MEDICA 2018

14/11/2018

Whether CT, MRT, X-rays or ultrasound – imaging methods provide insights into the human body and are irreplaceable for diagnostics. They are part of everyday hospital life since a long time, but what is currently happening in this field? We took a look – at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05/10/2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01/10/2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01.10.2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01/10/2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: Small, black, oval device with a sensor for fingerprints; Copyright: NuvoAir AB

Air Next: sharing spirometry data for better treatment

24/09/2018

Some diseases require close, permanent control of the patient, especially if they are chronic and, if unchecked, potentially dangerous, like some lung diseases. Monitoring them is quite cumbersome, because patients regularly need to visit their physician or a hospital. Wireless devices for home measurements offer at least some comfort and relieve to patients.
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Image: for better care: the electronic patient file; Copyright: panthermedia.net/hasloo

Electronic Health Record: Transparent Patient?

21/09/2018

A smart hospital has many components, which ultimately come together as a connected whole, thus achieving better patient care. One crucial piece of the puzzle that some countries like the U.S. have implemented but one that’s still missing in Germany is the electronic health record (or electronic medical record). It is shrouded in controversy and yet a critical aspect of the hospital of the future.
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Image: View over the shoulder of a person with a tablet in his hand, showing the operating theatre in front of him with screens and devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Master plan Smart Hospital: well-connected is half cared for

03/09/2018

Artificial intelligence makes the diagnosis, robots perform the surgery and physicians manage all processes via touchscreen – is that what hospitals of the future will look like? And how far away are we actually from this future? Many hospital facilities are already on their way to becoming Smart Hospitals with the latest technology and where everything and everyone is linked and connected.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Older couple is sitting next to each other, using their smartphones; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Fabrice Michaudeau

Neurology: Early detection of Parkinson’s disease with app and data?

01/08/2018

Big Data is often likened to finding the proverbial needle in a haystack: Large volumes of data contain patterns that hold the answer to a particular question. The trick is to gather meaningful data and identify patterns. The i-PROGNOSIS research project shows how smart devices and an app team up to automatically collect data without disturbing the user.
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01/08/2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: Computer generated model of a human body, consisting of a white grid; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kheng Ho Toh

Diagnosing diseases with big data

01/08/2018

All of us generate data every day without even realizing it – sometimes it happens unconsciously and unintentionally. At this point, we are made of data and not just in the eyes of tech companies but also from a healthcare system perspective. Our electronic health records are a smorgasbord of data for example.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Biomechanical measuring systems – motion and posture analysis in orthopedics

21/06/2018

Biomechanical measuring systems are used in orthopedics to diagnose and treat misalignments and diseases. The Velamed Company uses its high-tech solutions to measure biomechanical parameters that enable a holistic analysis of human movement and posture. We took a closer look at how this works.
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Image: Man with mobile phone sitting on the floor in front of a sofa; Copyright: panthermedia.net/yacobchuk1

From data to diagnosis – digital help for depression

01/06/2018

Few diseases are as difficult to diagnose as depression. What's more, outsiders often don't perceive it as a disease. The reason for this are symptoms that are not directly visible. Sufferers of the disease tend to experience fear, worry, and despair in everyday life, when no doctor is present. This is the starting point for telemedicine tools such as online programs or smartphone apps.
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Image: A woman is looking at her smartphone in bed. She looks tired and exhausted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/leungchopan

The STEADY project: Managing depression with wearables

01/06/2018

These days, smartphones and wearables of all kinds more or less "incidentally" collect lots of personal data about our lives. Many people have privacy and security concerns – and rightfully so – especially if mountains of data fall into the wrong hands. But what if patients collect their own data and get help to use it for their own purposes?
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Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17/05/2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: Dr. Betsch next to a computer screen showing scans of the spine; Copyright: privat

Light and Bluetooth – dynamic measurement techniques for orthopedics

02/05/2018

X-rays for diagnostic imaging and therapy evaluation are still the norm in orthopedics. Meanwhile, patients who frequently need X-rays are repeatedly exposed to radiation. That's why the University Hospital RWTH Aachen uses and develops methods that are not just radiation-free but can also capture motions.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02/05/2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30/04/2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01/03/2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Three proofs in one go - Interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG

13/11/2017

Measles, mumps and rubella are usually mentioned in connection with the well-known polyvalent vaccine. Now, a novel DNA test can be used to remedy an unclear situation about an infection. It is supposed to detect all three diseases in just one step. Find out more in our interview with Genekam Biotechnology AG at MEDICA 2017.
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