Imaging, sonography, endoscopy – a view on the heart -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Logo of brainlife.io; Copyright: brainlife.io

Cloud-computing web platform for neuroscience research

19.06.2019

Scientists in the United States, Europe and South America are reporting how a new cloud-computing web platform allows scientists to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery. The project, called brainlife.io, is led by Franco Pestilli, associate professor at Indiana University, in collaboration with colleagues across the university.
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Image: response of sickle cells observed under a microscope, on the right the chip next to a coin; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

Microfluidic sensor: monitoring sickle cell disease

19.06.2019

Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disorder that affects red blood cells, distorting their natural disc shape into a crescent moon or "sickle" shape. Normal red blood cells move freely through small vessels throughout the body to deliver oxygen. With sickle cell disease, the misshapen red blood cells become hard and sticky, making it difficult for them to move through blood vessels.
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Image: cells are placed on a microfluidic organ-chip; Copyright: Dr. Gad Vatine/BGU

Blood-brain barrier chip: using stem cells for the first time

18.06.2019

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.
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Image: different images of an artery; Copyright: Sung Soo Sean Choi et al.

Imaging: new modality targets cholesterol in arterial plaque

18.06.2019

In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), "Frequency-domain differential photoacoustic radar: theory and validation for ultra-sensitive atherosclerotic plaque imaging," researchers demonstrate a new imaging modality that successfully identifies the presence of cholesterol in the arterial plaque.
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Image: microscope images of the human Blood-Brain Barrier-on-Chip; Copyright: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Blood-Brain Barrier Chip: in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

17.06.2019

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream.
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Image: Woman investigates cell in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Cell analysis: deep learning dive to cell division

10.06.2019

Combining tissue imaging and artificial intelligence, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina probed deeper into how cell division cycles are regulated, in this study released online in the May 2019 issue of Cell Reports.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03.06.2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03.06.2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03.06.2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: hand holding orange fabric; Copyright: University of Borås

Wearables: new method to evaluate comfort of smart and functional textiles

31.05.2019

Until now, user-friendliness has been the focus of the development of smart and functional textiles. Now it is time to address comfort when wearing these textiles – a quality factor that should be of interest to the industry.
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Image: laboratory work; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Diagnostics: biomarkers help tailor diuretic use in acute heart failure patients

31.05.2019

Adrenomedullin activity predicts which acute heart failure patients are at the greatest risk of death without diuretic treatment post-discharge, according to late breaking research presented today at Heart Failure 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
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Image: Preemie in an incubator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ondroo

Intensive care: music helps to build the brains of preemies

30.05.2019

In Switzerland, as in most industrialized countries, nearly 1% of children are born “very prematurely”, i.e. before the 32nd week of pregnancy, which represents about 800 children yearly. While advances in neonatal medicine now give them a good chance of survival, these children are however at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders.
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Image: graphic of disrupted regulation of autism-related genes; Copyright: Troyanskaya lab

AI detects a new class of mutations behind autism

30.05.2019

Many mutations in DNA that contribute to disease are not in actual genes but instead lie in the 99% of the genome once considered "junk." Even though scientists have recently come to understand that these vast stretches of DNA do in fact play critical roles, deciphering these effects on a wide scale has been impossible until now.
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Image: female researcher holds up a test strip; Copyright: Andrew Higley/UC Creative Services

Diagnostic test: simple test can tell if you're stressed out

29.05.2019

Stress is often called "the silent killer" because of its stealthy and mysterious effects on everything from heart disease to mental health. Now researchers at the University of Cincinnati have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva.
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Image: look over the shoulder of two doctors discussing brain scans; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Imaging: altered brain activity in antisocial teenagers

29.05.2019

Teenage girls with problematic social behavior display reduced brain activity and weaker connectivity between the brain regions implicated in emotion regulation. The findings of an international study now offer a neurobiological explanation for the difficulties some girls have in controlling their emotions, and provide indications for possible therapy approaches.
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Image: illustration of the production of tissues and organs with lithography; Copyright: F. Pampaloni, BRIGHTER, 2019

Tissue Engineering: producing tissue and organs through lithography

28.05.2019

The production of artificial organs is a hot research topic. In the near future, artificial organs will compensate for the lack of organ donations and replace animal experiments. Although there are already promising experiments with 3D printers that use a "bio-ink" containing living cells, a functional organ has never been created in this way.
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Image: team photo in which one man is holding a smartphone into the camera and one man sits in front of a computer; Copyright: National University of Singapore

mHealth: AI to enhance cognitive performance

28.05.2019

Researchers have shown that AI could potentially be used to customise training regimens for individuals to personalise learning and improve cognitive performance. Using performance data from a given person, CURATE.AI creates an individualised profile that enables cognitive training to be tailored to the individual's learning habits and competencies so as to enhance training effectiveness.
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Image: group of people posing for the camera; Copyright: UAB Institut de Neurociencies

Diagnostic test: biomarker can diagnose Alzheimer's in its earliest stages

27.05.2019

Alzheimer's disease is the major cause of dementia and so far, no effective treatment can prevent, delay or stop its progression. We know that AD has an extensive prodromal stage (with initial symptoms preceding the disease) which lasts 15 to 20 years before clinical signs are evident. To envision an effective treatment for AD, we need to be able to accurately diagnose AD at its earliest stages.
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Blood test: How effective is stem cell transplantation?

24.05.2019

University of Maryland School of Medicine study shows the potential of transplanted stem cell secretions as a liquid biopsy.
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Image: woman suffering from colon cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Tharakorn

Diagnostic tests: Identifying cancer treatment in five days

23.05.2019

UNIGE researchers have developed a cell co-culture platform that can reproduce a patient's tumour in 3D and test the best treatment combinations for its specific case in just five days.
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 Image: Abdelrasoul leads the research team of University of Saskatchewan; Copyright: Daniel Hallen, University of Saskatchewan

Wearables: World's first wearable kidney

23.05.2019

An artificial portable kidney that patients who have suffered renal failure could wear is to be created by a research team at the University of Saskatchewan with federal funding.
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Images: Researchers work with microscopes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / LightField Studios

Microscope: Technology revolutionizes drug development

22.05.2019

The search for new drugs to combat diseases more effectively could be revolutionised through a new £30 million electron microscopy project. Experts would be able to see, for the first time, how a particular drug works within a patient at a cellular level or the molecular processes set in motion by a genetic mutation.
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Image: Woman with dementia listens to music; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Assistance systems: AI radio for people with dementia

21.05.2019

Radio Me will address key causes of hospital admission for people with dementia, such as agitation and not taking medication correctly. As a result, it is hoped quality of life will improve, and people will be able to remain living independently at home for longer.
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Image: Girl with asthma; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Aaron Amat

App: Asthma tracking for children

21.05.2019

An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department.
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Image: Researcher with a microfluidic chip; Copyright: panthermedia.net / hquality

Microfluidic chip: New technology to capture tumor cells

20.05.2019

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.
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Image: Doctor analyzes images of brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / EvgeniyShkolenko

Neuroimaging: Big data helps improve diagnosis accuracy

20.05.2019

A team of researchers from Osaka University and The University of Tokyo developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG.
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Image: MR image of a human torso with a part marked in green; Copyright: University Hospital Zurich

MR-guided treatment for life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia

15.05.2019

In a world first, UHZ has succeeded in treating a patient with life-threatening cardiac arrythmia using MR-controlled radio ablation.
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Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: graphic of cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wolfgang Rieger

Analyser system: New approach catalogues vast cell number

14.05.2019

Data-sampling method makes "sketches" of unwieldy biological datasets while still capturing the full diversity of cell types. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.
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Image: doctor holds hand of a patient with Parkinson`s disease; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ocskaymark

Diagnostics: Novel device for Parkinson’s disease

13.05.2019

Presently there are no disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease; however, one potential strategy for treatment is to prevent α-synuclein aggregation. As a first step, researchers at Osaka University have developed a device that can assess the degree of α-synuclein aggregation in the brain.
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Image: doctor points at an brain imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sudok1

Imaging: New technique uses protein of scorpion venom

13.05.2019

A novel imaging technique that uses a synthesized form of scorpion venom to light up brain tumors has shown promise in a clinical trial. The imaging system enables neurosurgeons to better see malignant growths that often are difficult to fully eliminate.
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Image: senior woman with VR glasses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Marko Volkmar

VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia

10.05.2019

Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research by the University of Kent has discovered.
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Image: close-up of liquid metal drop, used to make the mini-centrifuge; Copyright: RMIT University

Organ-on-a-chip: mini-centrifuge for simpler study of blood cells

10.05.2019

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body. The new micro-device for fluid analysis will enable more tailored experiments in drug development and disease research via new 'organ-on-chip' systems.
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Image: senior woman in a wheelchair watching TV from above; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

eHealth: wireless system collects health and behavioral data

09.05.2019

We live in a world of wireless signals flowing around us and bouncing off our bodies. MIT researchers are now leveraging those signal reflections to provide scientists and caregivers with valuable insights into people's behavior and health.
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Image: close-up of a crying child; Copyright: Anthony Kelly

AI can detect depression in a child's speech

08.05.2019

A machine learning algorithm can detect signs of anxiety and depression in the speech patterns of young children, potentially providing a fast and easy way of diagnosing conditions that are difficult to spot and often overlooked in young people, according to new research published in the Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: man with smartwatch playing piano; Copyright: Carnegie Mellon University

mHealth: Smartwatches sense hand activity

07.05.2019

We've become accustomed to our smartwatches and smartphones sensing what our bodies are doing, be it walking, driving or sleeping. But what about our hands? It turns out that smartwatches, with a few tweaks, can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing.
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Image: man in the laboratory, in front of him a screen; Copyright: Joseph Xu, UM College of Engineering

Laboratory medicine: new method for liquid biopsies

07.05.2019

Advancing technology is allowing scientists increasingly to search for tiny signs of cancer and other health issues in samples of patients' blood and urine. These "liquid biopsies" are less invasive than a traditional biopsy, and can provide information about what's happening throughout the body instead of just at a single site.
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Image: sample of the 'Gut-On-A-Chip' Technology hold by a biomedical engineer; Copyright: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Gut-on-a-chip: personalized treatment for Crohn's disease

06.05.2019

To model human health and disease, organ-on-a-chip technology mimics the human body's organ structure, functionality and physiology in a controlled environment. These miniature systems, which serve as accurate models of various organs from the heart and lungs to the gut and the kidneys, can use a patient's own cells to test drugs and understand disease processes.
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Image: elderly laboratory worker holds a chip and looks at it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/matej kastelic

Microfluidic chip to better detect Ebola virus

06.05.2019

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections.
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Image: Doctor is investigating kidney disease; Copyright: panthermedia.net / NataliMis

Analzing system: Breakthrough designation KidneyIntelX™

03.05.2019

Renalytix AI plc (AIM: RENX), a developer of artificial intelligence-enabled clinical diagnostics for kidney disease, announces that it has been granted Breakthrough Device designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for its lead diagnostic, KidneyIntelX™. This is the first such designation for an AI-enabled diagnostic for kidney disease publicly announced by any company.
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Image: Graphic of a spinglass of human gene interactions; Copyright: Graeme Benstead-Hume, University of Sussex

Computational system: Algorithms for cancer treatments

02.05.2019

While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes.
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Image: Stetoscope on a medical document about ovarian cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Premium shots

Imaging: System helps to remove tiny ovarian tumors

01.05.2019

Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed only after it has reached an advanced stage, with many tumors spread throughout the abdomen. Most patients undergo surgery to remove as many of these tumors as possible, but because some are so small and widespread, it is difficult to eradicate all of them.
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Image: Doctor and patient carrying out hand exercises; Copyright: panthermedia.net / photographee.eu

Physiotherapy: Quality post-stroke rehabilitation system

30.04.2019

Researchers of Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU) and Italian high-tech company Gruppo Fos Lithuania are developing a technology for the personalised care of the patients who have experienced a stroke. After collecting data of physiological parameters, the multimodal system will choose personalised rehabilitation solutions for each patient.
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Image: laboratory devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Diagnostics: Test for effective treatment of breast cancer

30.04.2019

A breast cancer test has been found that helps doctors make treatment decisions for some breast cancer patients, following research carried out at Queen Mary University of London and funded by Cancer Research UK.
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Image: An ELISA test strip is compared to a coloured scale; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Software aims to reduce variability in ELISA biomarker tests

24.04.2019

A new computational approach has been developed to reduce variability in common research biomarker tests, a promising step in improving the ability of biomedical researchers and basic scientists to reproduce data and facilitate more consistent results across laboratories and long-term projects.
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Image: Laboratory device with a lot of glass vials; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kagemusha

World Laboratory Day 2019 – working behind the scenes of medicine

23.04.2019

They are working in the background, but the things they do often decide about the right therapy or can even be life savers: labs and laboratory technology are probably the most important part of today’s medicine. This is why World Laboratory Day aims to draw attention to this "hidden" part of medicine.
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Image: Hand with a pincer holds a small white implant; Copyright: Iris Maurer

ENT: new adhesive structures for medical applications

23.04.2019

In cooperation with the Saarland University Hospital, the INM has developed bioinspired adhesive structures for the treatment of eardrum injuries. The adhesive structures are now to be transferred into a biomedical product.
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Image: Close-up of a woman with blue eyes wearing contact lenses; Copyright: Fraunhofer IAP

Drug delivery: contact lenses with medicine and sugar

22.04.2019

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP are working with Israeli and German partners to develop long-wearing contact lenses that can release medicine. The active ingredient is encapsulated in liposomes and bound to the inside of the contact lenses. This enables it to remain in the eye for longer.
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Image: A pin in a map; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Klanneke

Medical imaging: roadmap for AI use

22.04.2019

In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The workshop was co-sponsored by NIH, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and The Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research (The Academy).
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Image: lab technician photographed in front of a computer in a lab; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Viktor Cap

New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

19.04.2019

In order to understand the brain, scientists must be able to see the brain--cell by cell, and moment by moment. However, because brains comprise billions of microscopic moving parts, faithfully recording their activity comes with many challenges.
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Super-resolved vascular imaging in vivo.  Credit: Pengfei Zhang, Lei Li, and Lihong V. Wang

Imaging: In vivo super-resolution PACT

19.04.2019

Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a non-invasive hybrid imaging technique that excites biological tissues with light and detects the subsequently generated ultrasound to form images.
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Image: doctors in front of an MRI Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Arne Trautmann

AI performs as well as experienced radiologists

18.04.2019

UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer. The
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Image: lab technician photographed at the microscope from below; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Robert Przybysz

Imaging: ultrafast 3D Images of Nanostructures

17.04.2019

Lensless microscopy with X-rays, or coherent diffractive imaging, is a promising approach. It allows researchers to analyse complex three-dimensional structures, which frequently exist in nature, from a dynamic perspective.
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Image:Pig lung being irradiated with red light to inactivate viruses; Copyright: Cristina Kurachi

Radiation: eliminating bacteria and viruses

15.04.2019

A new technique for the decontamination of organs before transplantation using ultraviolet and red light irradiation has been developed by Brazilian and Canadian researchers and is described in an article published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Image: Principal investigator Muthu Wijesundara models a glove; Copyright: University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute

Wearables: healing glove reaches major milestone

12.04.2019

The revolutionary bioengineered healing glove created by researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington Research Institute (UTARI) and the University of Washington has completed another key step on the road toward commercialization.
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Image: purple 3D human knee meniscus created using the ultrasound-assisted biofabrication technique; Copyright: Rohan Shirwaiker, NC State University

Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

12.04.2019

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.
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Image: hand with a smartwatch picks up an apple from a fruit bowl; Copyright: Global Kinetics Corporation

Wearables: wrist band to empower Parkinson's patients

11.04.2019

People with Parkinson's could see their care transformed thanks to a new service involving wearable technology. The project, entitled Developing Home-based Parkinson's Care, will see patients use a wrist-worn device known as a Personal Kinetigraph as part of a new scheme to help them and a specialist team monitor their condition at home.
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Image: hand holding the 3D ultrasound probe; Copyright: Schulich Medicine & Dentistry, Western University

3D ultrasound gives clearer picture to treat gynecological cancer

11.04.2019

New technology developed at Western University is providing an improved way for radiation oncologists to deliver treatment to women with gynaecological cancers, including vaginal, cervical and uterine cancer.
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Image: several images showing embryonic development; Copyright: University of Houston

Imaging technology will offer new clues to embryonic development

10.04.2019

Soon after conception, an embryo's circulatory system connects to that of its mother. Complications that occur at this critical time can result in miscarriage or birth defects with long-term chronic conditions. Unfortunately, limitations in imaging technologies prevent researchers from fully understanding the cellular-level events leading up to this crucial point.
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Image: several images of a 3D printed soft robot hand; Copyright: Ramses Martinez/Purdue University

3D printed robots could be caring for elderly

10.04.2019

The world's elderly population is booming. The number of older people - those age 60 years or older - is expected to more than double by 2050 and is growing faster than all younger age groups across the globe. This trend comes with an increasing demand for caregivers capable of providing 24-hour care, not only at hospitals or nursing homes, but also at private homes and apartments.
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Image: graphic showing the function of the smart fabric on the left, arm with a bandage on the right; Copyright: Dartmouth DartNets Lab

Smart fabric helps athletic coaching and physical therapy

09.04.2019

A computer science research team at Dartmouth College has produced a smart fabric that can help athletes and physical therapy patients correct arm angles to optimize performance, reduce injury and accelerate recovery.
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Image: man holds a wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair; Copyright: John Eisele/ CSU Photography

Laboratory medicine: sensor to detect viral infections

09.04.2019

A team of Colorado State University researchers has developed technology that can detect extremely small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Antibodies develop to infect cells or kill pathogens, essentially fighting off a bacteria or virus. The levels of antibodies in the blood can tell whether that person is sick.
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Image: mold of local teen Josie Fraticelli's hand that was scanned during the development of a personalized prosthetic; Copyright: Virginia Tech

Orthopedics: personalized prosthetics from the 3D printer

08.04.2019

With the growth of 3D printing, it's entirely possible to 3D print your own prosthetic from models found in open-source databases. But those models lack personalized electronic user interfaces like those found in costly, state-of-the-art prosthetics.
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Image: Researchers at NUS; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Cyber security: photons for optical fiber obstacle

05.04.2019

Researchers from the NUS-Singtel Cyber Security Research & Development Laboratory in Singapore demonstrate a way to improve quantum key distribution over fiber networks.
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Image: computational model for cancer treatment; Copyright: Kimberly Sabsay

Computational model for cancer treatment

05.04.2019

Researchers have developed a computational model for human MEK1, a protein with potential as a drug target for a variety of human cancers.
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Image: doctor with stetoscope examines child; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wong Sze Fei

Imaging: Method to diagnose heart disease in children

04.04.2019

A new study by biomedical engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas could significantly improve methods for detecting and diagnosing congenital heart disease in infants and small children.
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Image: brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd

Implants: 3D-printed skull provides window to brain

04.04.2019

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have developed a unique 3D-printed transparent skull implant for mice that provides an opportunity to watch activity of the entire brain surface in real time. The device allows fundamental brain research that could provide new insight for human brain conditions such as concussions, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.
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Image: head graphic brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Yuzach

AI for better assessment of brain tumor treatment

03.04.2019

A team from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. In their recent publication, the authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors.
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Image: cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lonely11

Machine learning model describes cell development

03.04.2019

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: on the left side a moving baby, on the right a stickman of it; Copyright: S Vanhatalo / University of Helsinki

AI identifies key patterns from video footage of infant movements

27.03.2019

Subtle characteristics in the spontaneous movement of very young babies may reveal clinically important aspects of their neurodevelopment. Visual assessment of typical movement patterns (General movements, GM) by a clinical expert is known to be effective in early identification of e.g. cerebral palsy (CP).
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Image: A doctor analyses a CT-Scan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Arne Trautmann

VR enables real-time view of patient anatomy

26.03.2019

Immersive virtual reality (VR) may enable interventional radiologists to improve treatments using real-time 3D images from inside a patient's blood vessels. New research shows that the interactive technology could provide faster, more efficient treatment, with less radiation exposure and greater precision, ease and confidence.
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Image: hospital corridor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AxelKillian

IT: Smart speaker technology for hospital medical treatments

26.03.2019

Smart speakers that are customarily used in your living room can be programmed to act as an aid to physicians in hospital operating rooms. Smart speakers, such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home, offer a conversational voice interface that allows interventional radiology (IR) physicians to ask questions and retrieve information needed for their patient treatments without breaking sterile scrub.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01.03.2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Preemie doll with drug delivery system on the nose; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Gentle medication for the little ones – with every breath

22.02.2019

According to the WHO, ten percent of babies worldwide are born prematurely. Since most organs of these tiny babies have not fully developed yet, it can quickly lead to complications and disorders and most notably affect the lungs of the premature infants. What's more, infections require gentle treatment, as the preemies themselves are fragile and susceptible – making this a challenging situation.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22.01.2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08.01.2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19.12.2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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Image: Hand prostheses is squeezing a small ball; Copyright: Alina Kettenbach

SoftHand: grasping intelligence for lower arm prostheses

10.12.2018

So far, lower arm prostheses often only functioned as a cosmetic disguise to conceal the missing body part. While newer models help the wearer with grip patterns, every hand grip has to be readjusted and newly activated. There is still no prosthetic device that is easy to control and allows a flexible response to objects the wearer is grasping.
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Image: Woman with electrodes on her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03.12.2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03.12.2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: A young boy who is wearing a medical device on his head; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ahfoto.mail.ru

Brain stimulation: treatment using electric current and magnetic fields

03.12.2018

The treatment for many neurological and mental disorders is far from being an easy feat. Drug therapies always require accurate medication adjustments, while brain surgeries have the potential for risks and complications. Non-invasive brain stimulation takes a different approach: magnetic fields and electric current change the activities in the brain - without putting the patient at risk.
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Image: Proband with a neuroprosthesis; Copyright: MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp – being able to grasp again with paraplegia

22.11.2018

Every year between 250.000 and 500.000 people suffer a spinal cord injury, MoreGrasp is intended to make their lives easier. The project aims to restore the lost gripping function in people with high paraplegia. Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a neuroprosthesis that is currently undergoing a feasibility study.
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Image: the model of a kidney with gripping tools and the adhesive; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

A clean kidney: Break then glue

08.11.2018

Not enough exercise, an unhealthy diet: Kidney stones develop when urine contains too many insoluble compounds and are now one of the most common diseases worldwide. The ailment annually affects 1.2 million people in Germany alone. The stones are broken up and taken out via endoscopic surgery. Now it’s possible to remove even the tiniest residual fragments. The solution: a biocompatible adhesive.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02.11.2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22.10.2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22.08.2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08.08.2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23.07.2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09.07.2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22.06.2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22.05.2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17.05.2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08.05.2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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Image: Woman is standing on a 3D scanner that measures her feet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/roman023

Biomechanical measuring systems: Versatile tools for many disciplines

02.05.2018

When human movements are no longer as smooth as they should be – due to misalignments or as the result of an injury for example – biomechanical measuring systems spring into action. Thanks to different types of sensors and optical technologies, physicians, therapists, and sports scientists embark on a search for possible causes and corrective options.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23.04.2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09.04.2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: young woman with VR-glasses in the VR-Lab, in front of it a young man at a computer, on which a virtual heart can be seen; Copyright: Kompetenzzentrum eLearning in der Medizin Baden-Württemberg

VR Lab for medical students: linking theory and practice

22.03.2018

Virtual reality and medicine are increasingly mentioned in the same context. In addition to the development of applications that support the treatment of patients suffering from chronic pain and anxiety, this technology also benefits medical staff. Two months ago, the Ulm University Hospital has opened the VR Lab, where medical students can train and learn with the help of 3D organs.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08.03.2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01.03.2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01.03.2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01.03.2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22.02.2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08.02.2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
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Image: Young female student is sitting between shelves on the floor of a library and reads; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brock Jones

Patient science: patients research cystic fibrosis

22.01.2018

Research does not always occur in laboratory settings. As part of citizen science, citizens collect data and make it available for research projects. Now, this approach is also adopted in medicine by way of patient science: in a new project, patients take part in cystic fibrosis research. The goal is to improve the lives of those who are affected by this chronic disease.
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"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08.01.2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04.01.2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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Image: Woman holding a doll in a glowing pyjamas; Copyright: Empa

Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20.12.2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: forearm bone which is scanned in the ultrasound hand scanner; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Using ultrasound for verification: proof of legal age via handheld scanner

22.11.2017

Human trafficking is a global crime that often preys on underage persons and forces them into prostitution and forced labor. In most cases, people are smuggled across borders with fake passports. Scientists at the Fraunhofer IBMT have now developed a non-invasive, handheld smartphone-compatible scanner that uses ultrasound to determine whether a person has reached full legal age.
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Image: Preview picture of video

MEDICA 2017: Cutting-edge, look into the future

13.11.2017

For exhibitors and visitors, MEDICA 2017 does not start until Monday. However, the trade press already gets a preview of some selected product highlights on the Sunday before the trade fair. We were there with the camera and met with some exhibitors. They gave us the opportunity to present cutting-edge products and to take a look at the medical technology of the future.
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Image: Surgeons during surgery; Copyright: UKR

Acute kidney injury: Early detection thanks to biomarker

08.11.2017

Major surgeries in the abdominal region often result in kidney injury in patients. Meanwhile, the clinical manifestations don't present until one or two days after the procedure. This causes physicians to lose valuable time to treat patients. The University Hospital Regensburg has researched a new concept for the treatment of kidney injuries for several years.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23.10.2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Picture: two women perform exercises and are wired with electrodes; Copyright: University of Erlangen/Wolfgang Kemmler

Whole-body electromyostimulation training: fitness or prevention?

09.10.2017

Whole-body electromyostimulation (WB-EMS) promises time-efficient muscle strength training that has positive effects after just a few sessions per week. Its objective is a fast increase in muscle mass and reduction of body fat. Can WB-EMS training replace conventional strength and endurance training? And can it help to prevent diseases or pain?
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02.10.2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: Illustration of the Leipzig spoon, which is pushed to the back of the eye; Copyright: University of Leipzig/M. Francke

The "Leipzig Spoon" to cure pathological myopia

22.09.2017

Many people all over the world suffer from myopia, also known as nearsightedness. A severe elongation of the eyeball is the cause behind it. If it continues to progress, it ultimately leads to complete loss of vision. Now an innovative medical device intends to stop this progression in the future.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01.09.2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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ICAROS VR - Training and Prevention in Virtual Reality

31.08.2017

The term gamification refers to the application of elements of game playing in non-game contexts, for example, to encourage participants to engage in a task that is otherwise deemed too monotonous. We are visiting the German Sport University Cologne to interview Dr. Boris Feodoroff, who together with his team is testing a training device.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22.08.2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08.08.2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: woman holding a sketch of a human lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness

Molecular Microsystems: Preventing Exacerbations of Asthma and COPD

01.08.2017

An increasing percentage of the world population suffers from chronic inflammatory disorders of the respiratory system. Acute attacks often lead to a worsening of the disease and considerably reduce the patient’s lung volume. Nine institutes of a research alliance under the Leibniz Institute umbrella are working on technologies designed to predict and thus prevent exacerbations.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01.08.2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24.07.2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Light microscope ChipScope - a glimpse into living cells

14.07.2017

A microscope that is only a few millimeters in size and that can help to consider cell changes in real time. This is the goal of the EU project ChipScope. Scientists led by Dr. Hutomo Wasisto in Braunschweig help to make this project come true.
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Image: A large medical device with a treatment couch and four movable boxes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Thomas Hecker

Cancer: refined treatment with proton minibeams

10.07.2017

Radiation therapies are an essential component of today’s oncology because they enable the treatment of localized tumors. Yet they have one major drawback: radiation damages not just tumor cells but also healthy tissue. One solution to solve this problem could be proton minibeam therapy, which uses finely focused beams.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22.06.2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: A physician is holding a globe in his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Modular Emergency Hospitals – Quick disaster response

08.06.2017

After earthquakes or other types of disasters, infrastructures are often damaged and local hospitals destroyed. A modular hospital, developed under the direction of the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department is designed to be ready for these types of disaster situations and support the emergency response.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01.06.2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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Image: Black-and-white picture, with some structures of the human body highlighted in color; Copyright: ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern

Cochlear implants: safe procedure thanks to surgical robots

22.05.2017

For many years, cochlear implants have restored a sense of hearing in people with certain types of hearing loss. For surgeons, the implantation requires a precise attention to detail under the microscope. The results for the patients improve significantly with a more precise placement of the electrode array. The use of a surgical robot can increase the accuracy of the procedure.
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Image: A hand tips on a lying tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Koson Rattanaphan

Project A.L.I.N.A: Training in the interdisciplinary emergency room

08.05.2017

How can emergency room associates continue to educate themselves in a fast manner and without bureaucratic hurdles? The A.L.I.N.A Project, which gives associates new tools with special assistance services and learning environments, delivers the solution. We spoke with Prof. Sabine Blaschke at the University Hospital Göttingen about these tools and how they work.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02.05.2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Compass pointing towards the word creativity. In the compass’s center is a ball that shows the Indian flag; Copyright: panthermedia.net/eabff

Technology: India offers potential for research and development

02.05.2017

When it comes to the production and development of tech products, many people immediately think of Germany, Japan, the U.S. or Taiwan. What’s often unknown is that an emerging market like India also offers great potential. After all, the country has a large number of experts and just as much technical knowledge at its disposal.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24.04.2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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Image: Computer-generated graphic showing two hip balls next to each other. Implantation of a sleeve is demonstrated on them; Copyright: revomotion GmbH Köln

Hip joint: sleeve versus endoprosthesis

10.04.2017

People with hip osteoarthritis often suffer from severe pain and only an endoprosthesis implantation can provide relief. This involves a major intervention and long-term rehabilitation because the implant requires the removal of a section of the thigh bone. The "MioHIP" research project looks for an elastic alternative.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03.04.2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03.04.2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03.04.2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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Light instead of darkness – Seeing with the Argus II Implant

29.03.2017

Retinitis pigmentosa is a hereditary eye disorder, which can lead to night blindness, restriction of the peripheral visual field and ultimately to blindness. The University Hospital Aachen, Germany, implants the Argus II retinal prosthesis system made by the Second Sight Company. It allows people with retinitis pigmentosa to perceive light and improve orientation.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01.03.2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22.02.2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
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Image: Detail of the app on a mobile phone; Copyright: Sonormed GmbH

Medical Device that fits in your pocket: music for Tinnitus relief

08.02.2017

Listening to your favorite music for at least 90 minutes a day and treating your tinnitus with it? Almost sounds too good to be true. Yet more and more German statutory health insurance providers pay for this treatment. We wanted to know more about it and spoke with Jörg Land, the CEO of Sonormed GmbH, about Tinnitracks.
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Image: Different eye stents lying beside a coin; Copyright: I.Chen

Stents versus Eye Drops: a new approach to aid glaucoma patients

01.02.2017

Using stents to treat glaucoma is not a new procedure but they have not been implanted into patients on a regular basis until only recently. But this is about to change, which is why MEDICA.de asked what these glaucoma mini-stents are able to do and who may be a good candidate for them. Professor Norbert Pfeiffer answered our questions.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01.02.2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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Image: Three physicians during a meeting; Copyright: KiTZ/Philipp Benjamin

Children's Tumor Center: consolidated treatment under one roof

02.01.2017

Treatments for children need to be different from treatment for adults – this also applies in oncology. Having said that, children do not just need new and different treatment concepts that still necessitate research. They also require the support from their families, who need to be nearby during treatment.
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