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Image: schematic representation of the sensor's mode of operation; Copyright: KAIST

Blood-based sensor helps to detect Alzheimer's disease

17.02.2020

A research team at KAIST reported clinically accurate multiplexed electrical biosensor for detecting Alzheimer's disease by measuring its core biomarkers using densely aligned carbon nanotubes.
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Image: woman talks to someone via computer; Copyright: Medical University of South Carolina, Sarah Pack

Telemedicine helps pregnant women tackle taboo issue

17.02.2020

Sarah, a military veteran living on the coast of South Carolina, knew she had a problem. The opioids prescribed for her pain were becoming a headache of their own.
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Image: immune cells counting each other; Copyright: Northwestern University

Immunology: cells consult each other to make decisions

14.02.2020

Scientists and physicians have long known that immune cells migrate to the site of an infection, which individuals experience as inflammation - swelling, redness and pain. Now, Northwestern University and University of Washington researchers have uncovered new evidence that this gathering is not just a consequence of immune activation.
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Image: person lying down and using a smartphone; Copyright: PantherMedia / cherayut000

App for a smart pregnancy

14.02.2020

Wouldn’t it be handy if you were able to record your baby’s heartbeat or even take an ultrasound scan just using a smartphone app at home? Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen (UKER) are investigating what would be needed in order to offer a service like this to expectant parents.
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Image: machine doing an examination; Copyright: Monash University

New technology to help diagnose and manage respiratory diseases

13.02.2020

Monash University researchers in Australia have developed radical non-invasive technology that can be used to diagnose respiratory lung diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and lung cancer, and potentially fast-track treatments for patients.
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Image: MRI of a brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dmytro surkov

Portable MRIs bring diagnostics to stroke patients

13.02.2020

A portable, low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system may become a safe and practical way to get accurate brain images at a patient's bedside, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2020, a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science of stroke and brain health.
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Image: fractured femurs at four weeks post-fracture; Copyright: Novosteo/Philip S. Low

Injectables for faster healing of bone fractures

12.02.2020

One in three adults aged 60 and over suffering from a hip fracture dies within one year. Now, a Purdue University-affiliated startup is moving closer to the start of clinical trials for a novel injectable drug that is targeted to heal broken bones faster and strengthen weak bones.
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Image: paper stripes formed like a head flying away; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lightsource

Non-invasive method to predict onset of dementia

12.02.2020

Information gathered from routine visits to the doctor is enough to accurately predict a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, according to new research. The researchers developed and tested machine learning algorithms using data from electronic medical records to identify patients who may be at risk for developing the dementia.
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Image: mini-gut organoid generated in the lab; Copyright: UC San Diego Health Sciences

Gut-in-a-dish model to define gut leaks

11.02.2020

Leaky gut is most often experienced by older people, patients with cancers or other chronic ailments, and people with especially stressful lifestyles. Stressors break down the zipper-like junctions between the cells that form the gut lining. Microbes and molecules that subsequently leak out through these cell gaps can trigger an immune response, contributing to a variety of diseases.
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Image: prosthetic hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/andriy popov

Prosthetics: improvments with eye-tracking data

11.02.2020

Prosthetic hands restore only some of the function lost through amputation. But combining electrical signals from forearm muscles with other sources of information, such as eye tracking, promises better prostheses. A study funded by the SNSF gives specialists access to valuable new data.
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