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Image: cells are placed on a microfluidic organ-chip; Copyright: Dr. Gad Vatine/BGU

Blood-brain barrier chip: using stem cells for the first time

18.06.2019

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.
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Image: microscope images of the human Blood-Brain Barrier-on-Chip; Copyright: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Blood-Brain Barrier Chip: in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

17.06.2019

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream.
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Image: Woman undergoing a CT scan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olsonv

Machine learning: superior results for low-dose CT

12.06.2019

Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality. Those new research findings were just published in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
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Image: Laboratory tests to identify cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sven Hoppe

Biomarker: Which pancreatic cysts may become cancerous?

10.06.2019

Cysts in the pancreas sometimes develop into the invasive cancer, depending on the type of cyst, but such growths often are not cancerous, creating a quandary for physicians who spot them via CT and MRI scans. Surgery to remove pancreatic cysts is often complex, so there is a need for new tools to identify which such cysts are most likely to develop into cancer and which are not.
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Image: A coloured microscopic image of an organoid; Copyright: Cincinnati Children's

Organ-on-a-chip: Bioengineered human liver disease

04.06.2019

Scientists successfully bioengineered human liver organoids that faithfully mimic key features of fatal liver disease in the laboratory. This allowed them to uncover underlying disease biology in the organoids and test a potential therapy that in preclinical lab tests reversed an often-fatal childhood condition called Wolman disease.
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Image: illustration of the production of tissues and organs with lithography; Copyright: F. Pampaloni, BRIGHTER, 2019

Tissue Engineering: producing tissue and organs through lithography

28.05.2019

The production of artificial organs is a hot research topic. In the near future, artificial organs will compensate for the lack of organ donations and replace animal experiments. Although there are already promising experiments with 3D printers that use a "bio-ink" containing living cells, a functional organ has never been created in this way.
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Image: blood sample tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / scanrail

Blood test: How effective is stem cell transplantation?

24.05.2019

University of Maryland School of Medicine study shows the potential of transplanted stem cell secretions as a liquid biopsy.
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 Image: Abdelrasoul leads the research team of University of Saskatchewan; Copyright: Daniel Hallen, University of Saskatchewan

Wearables: World's first wearable kidney

23.05.2019

An artificial portable kidney that patients who have suffered renal failure could wear is to be created by a research team at the University of Saskatchewan with federal funding.
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Image: Researcher with a microfluidic chip; Copyright: panthermedia.net / hquality

Microfluidic chip: New technology to capture tumor cells

20.05.2019

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.
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Image: A man is pointing an infrared thermometer at a baby; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olegkalina

Precise temperature measurements with invisible light

16.05.2019

Ordinarily, you will not encounter a radiation thermometer until somebody puts one in your ear at the doctor's office or you point one at your forehead when you are feeling feverish.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Bioprinted model of a vascular network in a glass tank; Copyright: Jordan Miller/Rice University

Organ bioprinting gets a breath of fresh air

15.05.2019

Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues. The innovation allows scientists to create exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body's natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other vital fluids.
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Image: sample of the 'Gut-On-A-Chip' Technology hold by a biomedical engineer; Copyright: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Gut-on-a-chip: personalized treatment for Crohn's disease

06.05.2019

To model human health and disease, organ-on-a-chip technology mimics the human body's organ structure, functionality and physiology in a controlled environment. These miniature systems, which serve as accurate models of various organs from the heart and lungs to the gut and the kidneys, can use a patient's own cells to test drugs and understand disease processes.
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Image: Stetoscope on a medical document about ovarian cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Premium shots

Imaging: System helps to remove tiny ovarian tumors

01.05.2019

Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed only after it has reached an advanced stage, with many tumors spread throughout the abdomen. Most patients undergo surgery to remove as many of these tumors as possible, but because some are so small and widespread, it is difficult to eradicate all of them.
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Image: doctors in front of an MRI Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Arne Trautmann

AI performs as well as experienced radiologists

18.04.2019

UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer. The
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Image:Pig lung being irradiated with red light to inactivate viruses; Copyright: Cristina Kurachi

Radiation: eliminating bacteria and viruses

15.04.2019

A new technique for the decontamination of organs before transplantation using ultraviolet and red light irradiation has been developed by Brazilian and Canadian researchers and is described in an article published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Image: head graphic brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Yuzach

AI for better assessment of brain tumor treatment

03.04.2019

A team from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. In their recent publication, the authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors.
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Image: cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lonely11

Machine learning model describes cell development

03.04.2019

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
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Image: A doctor analyses a CT-Scan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Arne Trautmann

VR enables real-time view of patient anatomy

26.03.2019

Immersive virtual reality (VR) may enable interventional radiologists to improve treatments using real-time 3D images from inside a patient's blood vessels. New research shows that the interactive technology could provide faster, more efficient treatment, with less radiation exposure and greater precision, ease and confidence.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: Preemie doll with drug delivery system on the nose; Copyright: Fraunhofer ITEM/Till Holland

Gentle medication for the little ones – with every breath

22.02.2019

According to the WHO, ten percent of babies worldwide are born prematurely. Since most organs of these tiny babies have not fully developed yet, it can quickly lead to complications and disorders and most notably affect the lungs of the premature infants. What's more, infections require gentle treatment, as the preemies themselves are fragile and susceptible – making this a challenging situation.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22.01.2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05.10.2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23.07.2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08.05.2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08.02.2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
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Image: Surgeons during surgery; Copyright: UKR

Acute kidney injury: Early detection thanks to biomarker

08.11.2017

Major surgeries in the abdominal region often result in kidney injury in patients. Meanwhile, the clinical manifestations don't present until one or two days after the procedure. This causes physicians to lose valuable time to treat patients. The University Hospital Regensburg has researched a new concept for the treatment of kidney injuries for several years.
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Image: Preview picture of video

A look at the medicine of tomorrow – At MEDICA Preview in Hamburg

08.11.2017

Every year in September, MEDICA Preview takes place at the University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf. It is intended to give visitors, exhibitors and the trade press a foretaste of MEDICA in November and tomorrow's medicine. This year, we were on the scene with our camera to learn more about opto genetics, smart hospitals and the support of patients with multiple organ failure.
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Image: A women with a bald head and a headscarf, smiling, sitting on a sofa talking ot another woman; Copyright:Katharina Bia asiewic

Irreversible Electroporation – Last hope for liver cancer patients

24.04.2017

Liver cancer is the fifth most common malignant tumor in the world. The tumor can be removed through surgery or by utilizing thermal ablation techniques. If a treatment with conservative methods is no longer possible, there is an alternative: irreversible electroporation (IRE). The effectiveness of this method was now confirmed by a clinical study.
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