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Image: blood-brain barrier dysfunction under hypoxia; Copyright: WFIRM

Organoids: inflammation induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction

30/07/2020

The scientists who developed the first 3D multicellular brain organoid with a functional blood brain barrier now report that the model could be a promising platform to screen drugs that could work to control inflammation, which is at the center of many neurological conditions, like ischemic stroke.
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Image: Electronic device that is connected to a laptop computer; Copyright: Daniel Fong, UC Davis

Non-invasive fetal oxygen monitor could make for safer deliveries

26/06/2020

A device to directly measure blood oxygen saturation in a fetus during labor has been developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis. By providing better information about the health of a fetus right before birth, the device could both reduce the rate of Cesarean sections and improve outcomes in difficult deliveries.
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Image: A montage of three pictures showing a tablet computer, an electronic component and a small round sensor; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Intelligent ultrasonic sensors for postoperative bladder monitoring

24/06/2020

After surgeries on the bladder, prostate or kidneys, a permanent irrigation of the bladder is often decisive for a successful healing process. An intelligent system called "VisIMon" was designed to support this. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT is developing the miniaturized ultrasound system for automated monitoring of bladder irrigation.
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Image: Black and white microscope image of a patch with a spiky surface; Copyright: Khademhosseini lab

Extraction of skin interstitial fluid using microneedle patches

05/06/2020

Researchers at the Terasaki Institute enhance tool for extraction of samples used in monitoring patient health.
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Image: A plastic bag is filled with a transparent fluid; Copyright: Johns Hopkins Medicine

New method to make kidney dialysis fluid for patients with COVID-19

01/06/2020

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has severely impacted the manufacturing and supply chains for many products. But while shortages of toilet paper, disinfectant cleaners and hand sanitizer get most of the news coverage, the diminishing reserve of one item - kidney dialysis fluid, also known as dialysate - presents a grave threat to the lives of people with acute kidney injury (AKI).
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Image: 3D imaging of the blood vessels of a mouse head using X-ray computer tomography; Copyright: Willy Kuo, UZH

Increased usability and precision in vascular imaging

27/05/2020

Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments.
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Image: Man taking a close-up picture of a woman's eye; Copyright: Young Kim, Purdue University

mHealth: tool measures hemoglobin without drawing blood

22/05/2020

Researchers have developed a way to use smartphone images of a person's eyelids to assess blood hemoglobin levels. The ability to perform one of the most common clinical lab tests without a blood draw could help reduce the need for in-person clinic visits, make it easier to monitor patients who are in critical condition, and improve care where access to testing laboratories is limited.
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Image: Physician in white scrubs standing next to a medical device - Dr. Chris McIntyre; Copyright: Lawson Health Research Institute

Canadian team first in world to treat COVID-19 with specialized dialysis

13/05/2020

As part of a randomized controlled trial, a team from Lawson Health Research Institute is the first in the world to treat a patient with COVID-19 using a modified dialysis device. The device gently removes a patient's blood, modifies white blood cells and returns them to fight hyperinflammation. It is being tested with critically ill patients at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC).
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Image: A gloved hand holds a cup with an urine sample; Copyright: PantherMedia/belchonok

COVID-19: kidney inflammation as early warning sign for severe course

13/05/2020

Scientists from the University Medical Center Goettingen develop a conceivable course of action for patients with COVID-19 infections to predict severity of systemic disease and complications. Published online in The Lancet.
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Image: Smiling man with a brown beard and short brown hair - Sergey Shevkoplyas; Copyright: University of Houston

Microfluidic device in development to treat babies with blood disorders

12/05/2020

With severe blood disorders, such as leukemia, doctors often rely on leukapheresis, a procedure in which large machines extract whole blood from patients to separate white blood cells from the rest of the blood, which is then returned back to the patient.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01/07/2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22/03/2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21/11/2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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