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Image: A computer-generated image of short DNA strands; Copyright: Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry

Diagnostics: A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method

19.06.2019

Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.
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Image: cells are placed on a microfluidic organ-chip; Copyright: Dr. Gad Vatine/BGU

Blood-brain barrier chip: using stem cells for the first time

18.06.2019

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.
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Image: microscope images of the human Blood-Brain Barrier-on-Chip; Copyright: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Blood-Brain Barrier Chip: in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

17.06.2019

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream.
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Image: Reasearchers who developed FEAST to diagnose bacteria-related health conditions; Copyright: UCLA Samueli Engineering

Computational system: tool pinpoints gut's bacteria

14.06.2019

A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.
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Image: patient with Parkinson`s playing with a puzzle; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AndrewLozovyi

Ultrasound: restoring dopaminergic pathway at Parkinson's

11.06.2019

While there are several thousand drugs available to treat brain diseases, they cannot penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain. The BBB, which protects the brain from pathogens, also prevents most drugs from gaining access to the brain functional tissue, a well-known challenge to the treatment of all brain diseases including neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease.
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Image: DNA strands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Rost9

AI: method to improve rare disease diagnosis

11.06.2019

The team under Prof. Tom Lenaerts (VUB-ULB) of the IB² has developed an AI algorithm that makes it possible to identify combinations of genetic variants or abnormalities that cause rare diseases through computer analysis.
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Image: Woman investigates cell in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Cell analysis: deep learning dive to cell division

10.06.2019

Combining tissue imaging and artificial intelligence, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina probed deeper into how cell division cycles are regulated, in this study released online in the May 2019 issue of Cell Reports.
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Image: A DNA sample is taken from the mouth of a woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Peter Jobst

Advance in genome analysis: DNA tests for patients move closer

05.06.2019

Diseases caused by genetic changes could be detected more readily thanks to an advance in DNA analysis software. The development will make it easier to integrate genetic testing into health care systems such as the UK's National Health Service, which cares for around three million people affected by genetic diseases in the UK.
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Image: A coloured microscopic image of an organoid; Copyright: Cincinnati Children's

Organ-on-a-chip: Bioengineered human liver disease

04.06.2019

Scientists successfully bioengineered human liver organoids that faithfully mimic key features of fatal liver disease in the laboratory. This allowed them to uncover underlying disease biology in the organoids and test a potential therapy that in preclinical lab tests reversed an often-fatal childhood condition called Wolman disease.
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Image: laboratory work; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Diagnostics: biomarkers help tailor diuretic use in acute heart failure patients

31.05.2019

Adrenomedullin activity predicts which acute heart failure patients are at the greatest risk of death without diuretic treatment post-discharge, according to late breaking research presented today at Heart Failure 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
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Image: graphic of disrupted regulation of autism-related genes; Copyright: Troyanskaya lab

AI detects a new class of mutations behind autism

30.05.2019

Many mutations in DNA that contribute to disease are not in actual genes but instead lie in the 99% of the genome once considered "junk." Even though scientists have recently come to understand that these vast stretches of DNA do in fact play critical roles, deciphering these effects on a wide scale has been impossible until now.
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Image: group of people posing for the camera; Copyright: UAB Institut de Neurociencies

Diagnostic test: biomarker can diagnose Alzheimer's in its earliest stages

27.05.2019

Alzheimer's disease is the major cause of dementia and so far, no effective treatment can prevent, delay or stop its progression. We know that AD has an extensive prodromal stage (with initial symptoms preceding the disease) which lasts 15 to 20 years before clinical signs are evident. To envision an effective treatment for AD, we need to be able to accurately diagnose AD at its earliest stages.
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Image: blood sample tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / scanrail

Blood test: How effective is stem cell transplantation?

24.05.2019

University of Maryland School of Medicine study shows the potential of transplanted stem cell secretions as a liquid biopsy.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: man in the laboratory, in front of him a screen; Copyright: Joseph Xu, UM College of Engineering

Laboratory medicine: new method for liquid biopsies

07.05.2019

Advancing technology is allowing scientists increasingly to search for tiny signs of cancer and other health issues in samples of patients' blood and urine. These "liquid biopsies" are less invasive than a traditional biopsy, and can provide information about what's happening throughout the body instead of just at a single site.
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Image: Graphic of a spinglass of human gene interactions; Copyright: Graeme Benstead-Hume, University of Sussex

Computational system: Algorithms for cancer treatments

02.05.2019

While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15.11.2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01.03.2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: A group of physicians is holding large colorful puzzle pieces in their hands and is putting them together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Personalized medicine: a paradigm shift is gaining momentum

01.03.2018

Personalized medicine does not follow a "one-size-fits-all" treatment approach but emphasizes a "tailor-made" paradigm, meaning a treatment is customized to each individual person's case. For patients, this increases the chances of treatment success and means fewer side effects. While the approach originates in the field of oncology, it is now also increasingly applied to other disease patterns.
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Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01.03.2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Look over the shoulder of an eye surgeon who is operating at a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mearicon

Ophthalmology today and tomorrow: surgery and more

01.02.2017

Ophthalmology procedures and eye surgeries have been around since ancient times. Today we can hardly imagine the types of circumstances that surrounded any surgical procedures to our perhaps most important sense organ in those days and later eras. Meanwhile, the present and future of this medical specialty looks all the more promising.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01.02.2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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