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Image: A computer-generated image of short DNA strands; Copyright: Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry

Diagnostics: A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method

19.06.2019

Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.
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Image: response of sickle cells observed under a microscope, on the right the chip next to a coin; Copyright: Florida Atlantic University

Microfluidic sensor: monitoring sickle cell disease

19.06.2019

Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disorder that affects red blood cells, distorting their natural disc shape into a crescent moon or "sickle" shape. Normal red blood cells move freely through small vessels throughout the body to deliver oxygen. With sickle cell disease, the misshapen red blood cells become hard and sticky, making it difficult for them to move through blood vessels.
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Image: cells are placed on a microfluidic organ-chip; Copyright: Dr. Gad Vatine/BGU

Blood-brain barrier chip: using stem cells for the first time

18.06.2019

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.
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Image: microscope images of the human Blood-Brain Barrier-on-Chip; Copyright: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Blood-Brain Barrier Chip: in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

17.06.2019

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream.
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Image: man with VR glasses in front of two monitors with microscopy data; Copyright: Carnegie Mellon University

VR: visualize expansion microscopy data and illuminate new treatments

17.06.2019

A combined research team from Carnegie Mellon University and Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason is pairing a nanoscale imaging technique with virtual reality (VR) technology to create a method that allows researchers to "step inside" their biological data.
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Image: Bacteria in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Bacteriology testing: Bacteria detected in minutes

13.06.2019

A discovery by researchers at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick offers a new technology for detecting bacteria in minutes by `zapping` the bacteria with electricity.
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Image: Hydrogel for wound healing; Copyright: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Wound healing: Molecular bait for hydrogels

12.06.2019

The team led by Brown School of Engineering bioengineer Antonios Mikos and graduate student Jason Guo have developed modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure.
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Image: Woman investigates cell in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Cell analysis: deep learning dive to cell division

10.06.2019

Combining tissue imaging and artificial intelligence, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina probed deeper into how cell division cycles are regulated, in this study released online in the May 2019 issue of Cell Reports.
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Image: Laboratory tests to identify cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sven Hoppe

Biomarker: Which pancreatic cysts may become cancerous?

10.06.2019

Cysts in the pancreas sometimes develop into the invasive cancer, depending on the type of cyst, but such growths often are not cancerous, creating a quandary for physicians who spot them via CT and MRI scans. Surgery to remove pancreatic cysts is often complex, so there is a need for new tools to identify which such cysts are most likely to develop into cancer and which are not.
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Image: laboratory work; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Diagnostics: biomarkers help tailor diuretic use in acute heart failure patients

31.05.2019

Adrenomedullin activity predicts which acute heart failure patients are at the greatest risk of death without diuretic treatment post-discharge, according to late breaking research presented today at Heart Failure 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
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Image: female researcher holds up a test strip; Copyright: Andrew Higley/UC Creative Services

Diagnostic test: simple test can tell if you're stressed out

29.05.2019

Stress is often called "the silent killer" because of its stealthy and mysterious effects on everything from heart disease to mental health. Now researchers at the University of Cincinnati have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva.
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Image: illustration of the production of tissues and organs with lithography; Copyright: F. Pampaloni, BRIGHTER, 2019

Tissue Engineering: producing tissue and organs through lithography

28.05.2019

The production of artificial organs is a hot research topic. In the near future, artificial organs will compensate for the lack of organ donations and replace animal experiments. Although there are already promising experiments with 3D printers that use a "bio-ink" containing living cells, a functional organ has never been created in this way.
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Image: group of people posing for the camera; Copyright: UAB Institut de Neurociencies

Diagnostic test: biomarker can diagnose Alzheimer's in its earliest stages

27.05.2019

Alzheimer's disease is the major cause of dementia and so far, no effective treatment can prevent, delay or stop its progression. We know that AD has an extensive prodromal stage (with initial symptoms preceding the disease) which lasts 15 to 20 years before clinical signs are evident. To envision an effective treatment for AD, we need to be able to accurately diagnose AD at its earliest stages.
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Image: blood sample tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / scanrail

Blood test: How effective is stem cell transplantation?

24.05.2019

University of Maryland School of Medicine study shows the potential of transplanted stem cell secretions as a liquid biopsy.
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Image: woman suffering from colon cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Tharakorn

Diagnostic tests: Identifying cancer treatment in five days

23.05.2019

UNIGE researchers have developed a cell co-culture platform that can reproduce a patient's tumour in 3D and test the best treatment combinations for its specific case in just five days.
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Images: Researchers work with microscopes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / LightField Studios

Microscope: Technology revolutionizes drug development

22.05.2019

The search for new drugs to combat diseases more effectively could be revolutionised through a new £30 million electron microscopy project. Experts would be able to see, for the first time, how a particular drug works within a patient at a cellular level or the molecular processes set in motion by a genetic mutation.
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Image: Researcher with a microfluidic chip; Copyright: panthermedia.net / hquality

Microfluidic chip: New technology to capture tumor cells

20.05.2019

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: graphic of cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wolfgang Rieger

Analyser system: New approach catalogues vast cell number

14.05.2019

Data-sampling method makes "sketches" of unwieldy biological datasets while still capturing the full diversity of cell types. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.
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Image: doctor holds hand of a patient with Parkinson`s disease; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ocskaymark

Diagnostics: Novel device for Parkinson’s disease

13.05.2019

Presently there are no disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease; however, one potential strategy for treatment is to prevent α-synuclein aggregation. As a first step, researchers at Osaka University have developed a device that can assess the degree of α-synuclein aggregation in the brain.
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Image: close-up of liquid metal drop, used to make the mini-centrifuge; Copyright: RMIT University

Organ-on-a-chip: mini-centrifuge for simpler study of blood cells

10.05.2019

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body. The new micro-device for fluid analysis will enable more tailored experiments in drug development and disease research via new 'organ-on-chip' systems.
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Image: man in the laboratory, in front of him a screen; Copyright: Joseph Xu, UM College of Engineering

Laboratory medicine: new method for liquid biopsies

07.05.2019

Advancing technology is allowing scientists increasingly to search for tiny signs of cancer and other health issues in samples of patients' blood and urine. These "liquid biopsies" are less invasive than a traditional biopsy, and can provide information about what's happening throughout the body instead of just at a single site.
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Image: sample of the 'Gut-On-A-Chip' Technology hold by a biomedical engineer; Copyright: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Gut-on-a-chip: personalized treatment for Crohn's disease

06.05.2019

To model human health and disease, organ-on-a-chip technology mimics the human body's organ structure, functionality and physiology in a controlled environment. These miniature systems, which serve as accurate models of various organs from the heart and lungs to the gut and the kidneys, can use a patient's own cells to test drugs and understand disease processes.
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Image: elderly laboratory worker holds a chip and looks at it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/matej kastelic

Microfluidic chip to better detect Ebola virus

06.05.2019

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections.
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Image: Doctor is investigating kidney disease; Copyright: panthermedia.net / NataliMis

Analzing system: Breakthrough designation KidneyIntelX™

03.05.2019

Renalytix AI plc (AIM: RENX), a developer of artificial intelligence-enabled clinical diagnostics for kidney disease, announces that it has been granted Breakthrough Device designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for its lead diagnostic, KidneyIntelX™. This is the first such designation for an AI-enabled diagnostic for kidney disease publicly announced by any company.
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Image: laboratory devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Diagnostics: Test for effective treatment of breast cancer

30.04.2019

A breast cancer test has been found that helps doctors make treatment decisions for some breast cancer patients, following research carried out at Queen Mary University of London and funded by Cancer Research UK.
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Image: A microscope above a silver metal plate; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPT

High-speed microscope with intuitive gesture control

26.04.2019

The Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology IPT in Aachen has developed a high-speed microscope for quality control of large-area objects for the semiconductor and electronics industries or for rapid testing of biological samples.
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Image: A large number of round microwells on a plate; Copyright: Tetsuhiro Harimoto/Columbia Engineering

Precision medicine: bacterial therapy in a dish

26.04.2019

Columbia engineers develop a new platform that recreates cancer in a dish to quickly determine the best bacterial therapy.
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Image: A patch with coloured dots on human skin; Copyright: American Chemical Society

Wearables: biosensor 'bandage' collects and analyzes sweat

25.04.2019

Like other biofluids, sweat contains a wealth of information about what's going on inside the body. However, collecting the fluid for analysis, usually by dripping or absorbing it from the skin's surface, can be time-consuming and messy.
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Image: An ELISA test strip is compared to a coloured scale; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Software aims to reduce variability in ELISA biomarker tests

24.04.2019

A new computational approach has been developed to reduce variability in common research biomarker tests, a promising step in improving the ability of biomedical researchers and basic scientists to reproduce data and facilitate more consistent results across laboratories and long-term projects.
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Image: Laboratory device with a lot of glass vials; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kagemusha

World Laboratory Day 2019 – working behind the scenes of medicine

23.04.2019

They are working in the background, but the things they do often decide about the right therapy or can even be life savers: labs and laboratory technology are probably the most important part of today’s medicine. This is why World Laboratory Day aims to draw attention to this "hidden" part of medicine.
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Image: lab technician photographed in front of a computer in a lab; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Viktor Cap

New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

19.04.2019

In order to understand the brain, scientists must be able to see the brain--cell by cell, and moment by moment. However, because brains comprise billions of microscopic moving parts, faithfully recording their activity comes with many challenges.
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Image: A microscope; Copyright: FAU/Sebastian Schürmann

Microscopy in the body

18.04.2019

Biotechnologists, physicists, and medical researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed technology for microscopic imaging in living organisms.
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Image: Cryo-EM structure of LA-PTH-bound human PTH1R in complex with Gs; Copyright: Zhao LH et al. 2019

Microscopy: near-atomic map of parathyroid hormone complex

17.04.2019

An international team of scientists has mapped a molecular complex that could aid in the development of better medications with fewer side effects for osteoporosis and cancer.
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Image: lab technician photographed at the microscope from below; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Robert Przybysz

Imaging: ultrafast 3D Images of Nanostructures

17.04.2019

Lensless microscopy with X-rays, or coherent diffractive imaging, is a promising approach. It allows researchers to analyse complex three-dimensional structures, which frequently exist in nature, from a dynamic perspective.
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Image: PAGA based embedding of the developmental trajectories in the Zebrafish embryo, colored by timepoint.; Copyright: Wagner et al., Science (2018)

Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

16.04.2019

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA.
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Image: a robot; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

AI singles out neurons faster than a human can

16.04.2019

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can trace the shapes of active neurons as accurately as human researchers can, but in a fraction of the time.
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Image: purple 3D human knee meniscus created using the ultrasound-assisted biofabrication technique; Copyright: Rohan Shirwaiker, NC State University

Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

12.04.2019

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.
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Image: man holds a wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair; Copyright: John Eisele/ CSU Photography

Laboratory medicine: sensor to detect viral infections

09.04.2019

A team of Colorado State University researchers has developed technology that can detect extremely small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Antibodies develop to infect cells or kill pathogens, essentially fighting off a bacteria or virus. The levels of antibodies in the blood can tell whether that person is sick.
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Image: computational model for cancer treatment; Copyright: Kimberly Sabsay

Computational model for cancer treatment

05.04.2019

Researchers have developed a computational model for human MEK1, a protein with potential as a drug target for a variety of human cancers.
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Image: cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lonely11

Machine learning model describes cell development

03.04.2019

From birth through to death, cells lead an eventful existence. Thanks to single-cell genomics, their destiny can be analyzed. But this method destroys the cell. In order to address this problem, researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Massachusetts use pseudodynamics, a mathematical model that estimates developmental processes from single-cell time series observations.
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Image: Picture of a new optical visualization of nano objects; Copyright: Kazan Federal University

Laboratory technology: New way of optical visualization?

01.04.2019

High-resolution optical microscopy methods promise breakthroughs in materials science, biology, and medicine. Today, their possibilities basically reach those of scanning electron microscopy.
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Image: Construction of an organelle in a living cell for protein biosynthesis; Copyright: Gemma Estrada Girona

Laboratory technology: designer organelles in cells

01.04.2019

A research team led by biophysical chemist Professor Edward Lemke has engineered a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell in a new complex biological translation process. The created membraneless organelle can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionalities.
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Image: A researcher is filling liquid into glas tubes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreamedia Ltd.

Cell analysis: How blood cells and immune cells are produced

25.03.2019

Researchers tracked and quantified the production of different kinds of blood cells and immune cells to understand how the body maintains a balanced supply.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01.02.2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

From algorithm to rapid test – Artificial Intelligence classifies blood cells

21.11.2018

Our blood reveals a lot about our physical health. The shape of our blood cells sheds light on several hereditary diseases for example. For a diagnosis, the cells must first be examined under the microscope and categorized into a specific cell class. We met with Dr. Stephan Quint and Alexander Kihm of the Institute of Physics at the Saarland University, who explained how this classification works.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with Hombrechtikon Systems Engineering AG

15.11.2018

Whether DNA testing, tissue analysis or blood tests – the secrets of life are unraveled in the laboratory. In order to master this challenge, all processes must first be optimized and automated. Which role HSE AG plays here, the Swiss company explains at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with ERBA Diagnostics Mannheim GmbH

15.11.2018

A lot of answers in medicine are found in the laboratory. Correct analysis is key to find the right diagnosis and cure for the patient. We learn more about innovative analysis devices at the stand of ERBA Diagnostics at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02.11.2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stasique

Back pain: The research project Ran Rücken is intended to help

10.09.2018

About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime. Too much or the wrong movements can also cause problems. "Ran Rücken", the interdisciplinary research project aims to determine the right minimum dose of exercise that proves effective. (Explanatory note: "Ran Rücken" can be loosely translated as "Target the Back")
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22.08.2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

Personalized cancer medicine – Best possible treatment with TherapySelect

30.04.2018

Medicine is getting more and more personalized. This is particularly interesting for oncology, since a cancer is as individual as the respective patient. When choosing a therapy, both the characteristics of the tumor and the personal characteristics of the patient must be considered. To see exactly what this looks like, we visited the diagnostics company TherapySelect, based in Heidelberg.
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01.03.2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01.03.2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22.02.2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01.02.2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image:

"Spray-On" muscle fibers for biomimetic surfaces

08.01.2018

Few patients with heart failure are fortunate enough to receive a donor's heart. Ventricular assist devices (or heart pumps) have been around for several years and are designed to buy time as patients wait for a transplant. Unfortunately, the body doesn't always tolerate these devices.
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Image: Three-dimensional image of a colored vessel structure; Copyright: René Hägerling

Pathology: detecting lymphedema with 3D microscopy

23.10.2017

According to the WHO, 300 million people throughout the world are affected by lymphedema. This condition occurs when fluid that flows between cells is no longer transported back into the blood circulation and accumulates in the skin. Triggers can be surgeries, injuries or genetic defects for example. A new microscopy technique could now also indicate the causes.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Point-of-care testing in the hospital – quality diagnostic results

18.10.2017

Point-of-care testing is an integral part of medicine. It enables simple, automated testing that yields fast results. Hospitals have also started to increasingly use POCT diagnostic systems over the past few years. We are guests at the Greifswald University Hospital where patient-side rapid diagnostic tests have already been successfully integrated into daily hospital operations.
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Image: Vials in a rack; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

MEDICA 2017: all about laboratory medicine at the MEDICA LABMED FORUM

02.10.2017

If you are interested in laboratory medicine and come to the MEDICA 2017, you will quickly notice that Exhibition Halls 1 and 2 were demolished. A new state-of-the art hall is meant to take their place. Until then, exhibitors from the field of laboratory medicine will be showcased at their temporary new location in the lightweight hall structures 3a and 18 on the fairgrounds.
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Image: interferometric detection of scattered light, iSCAT; Copyright: MPL

Interface between Physics and Medicine: new interdisciplinary center

22.08.2017

Physics has always supported medical science, especially when it comes to practical implementation. Now physicists and health professionals join in collaborative research at an interdisciplinary Center in Erlangen and incorporate fundamental principles of theoretical physics in their studies of diseases.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08.08.2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: Collage made of two images, one show a round, transparent plastic disc with micro channels, one shows a plastic chip; Copyright: Hahn-Schickard, Image Bernd Müller

Prenatal diagnosis: genetic analysis using droplet PCR

24.07.2017

A new analysis method that uses fetal DNA extracted from the mother’s blood is designed to non-invasively reach a prenatal diagnosis of genetic disorders in a child. A task force of the Hahn Schickard Society for Applied Research is an active part of the "ANGELab" project and co-developed this diagnostic procedure.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02.05.2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Demonstrator; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT

Medical imaging is onto septic fungi

03.04.2017

Instant treatment is absolute vital for patients developing sepsis. Providing a specific therapy early on is key. To manage this the pathogenic organisms need to be identified accurately. But a fungal sepsis can still be a hard nut to crack.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03.04.2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03.04.2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
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