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Image: MRI brain scan; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Bunyos30

New MRI technique could improve diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis

21/01/2022

It is important that multiple sclerosis is diagnosed and treated as early as possible in order to delay progression of the disease. The technique of magnetic resonance imaging plays a key role in this process. A new MRI technique has been used at MedUni Vienna as part of a research project that could pave the way to quicker assessment of disease activity in MS.
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Image: Orlando Simonetti and Heather Hermiller with a MRI machine; Copyright: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Ohio State researchers help develop new MRI

21/01/2022

New MRI technology, developed by Siemens in collaboration with researchers at The Ohio State University College of Medicine and College of Engineering, will expand imaging access for patients with implanted medical devices, severe obesity and claustrophobia.
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Image: Breast cancer vision; Copyright: Alina Barnett, Duke University

The first AI breast cancer sleuth that shows its work

18/01/2022

Computer engineers and radiologists at Duke University have developed an artificial intelligence platform to analyze potentially cancerous lesions in mammography scans to determine if a patient should receive an invasive biopsy.
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Image: Whole-spine MRI; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Whole spine MRI suspected child abuse

14/01/2022

According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), whole-spine MRI commonly demonstrates isolated thoracolumbar injuries in children with suspected abusive head trauma.
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Image: X-Ray Image Of Human Healthy Chest; Copyright: PantherMedia  / jovannig

Study finds AI accurately detects fractures on x-rays

23/12/2021

Emergency room and urgent care clinics are typically busy and patients often have to wait many hours before they can be seen, evaluated and receive treatment. Waiting for x-rays to be interpreted by radiologists can contribute to this long wait time because radiologists often read x-rays for a large number of patients.
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Image: Coronavirus; Copyright: PantherMedia  / lightsource

New model improves accuracy of machine learning in COVID-19 diagnosis while preserving privacy

17/12/2021

Researchers in the UK and China have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) model that can diagnose COVID-19 as well as a panel of professional radiologists, while preserving the privacy of patient data.
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Image: STIR image and DWI from whole-body MRI. ; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society, American Journal of Roentgenology

MRI and hybrid imaging outperform conventional tests for small cell lung cancer staging

13/12/2021

According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), MRI—with or without FDG PET coregistration—can improve the staging of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
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Image:  CT scan shows a slight reticular pattern in the left lower lobe and subpleural area; Copyright: Zheng et al.

Deep learning makes it possible to detect COVID-19 lesions by analyzing CT chest scans

03/12/2021

A new automated system that involves deep learning technology enables the detection of COVID-19 lesion via the analysis of a computed tomography (CT) scan. This system, described in a study published in the journal Computers in Biology and Medicine, has been carried out by researchers of the UB, the EURECAT Technology Centre of Catalonia, and the Computing Vision Center (CVC).
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Image: Man looking at MRI scan; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Ischukigor

MRI and AI can detect early signs of tumor cell death after novel therapy

02/12/2021

A team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has demonstrated ​​that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and artificial intelligence (AI) can be used to detect early signs of tumor cell death in response to a novel virus-based cancer therapy.
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Image: red marked liver in the human body; Copyright: PantherMedia  / sciencepics

New PET imaging-based tool detects liver inflammation from fatty liver disease

01/12/2021

A UC Davis Health team has developed a first-of-its-kind positron emission tomography (PET) scan imaging-based tool to detect liver inflammation in patients affected with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
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Image: Neuronal cell nuclei of the dentus gyratus and associated blood vessels; Copyright: M. Eckermann/T. Salditt

X-ray image throws light on neurodegenerative disease

29/11/2021

Researchers at the University of Göttingen and University Medical Center Göttingen have now found a new technique to measure and quantify neuronal tissue architecture in three dimensions and at high resolution, which enabled them to identify changes in neurons in Alzheimer's.
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Image: Dr. Jens Bankstahl and Professor Dr. Tobias Ross; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Better images for science

25/11/2021

In order to detect and research diseases, it is important to look inside the body. For this purpose, there are various imaging methods – from ultrasound examinations to X-rays and computer tomography. Molecular imaging provides a particularly precise insight, showing biological processes and organ functions "live".
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Image: Grad-CAM heatmaps for deep learning models; Copyright: American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Deep learning for extremity radiographs confounded by labels

19/11/2021

According to an open-access Editor's Choice article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), convolutional neural networks (CNN) trained to identify abnormalities on upper extremity radiographs are susceptible to a ubiquitous confounding image feature that could limit their clinical utility: radiograph labels.
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Image: Appendicitis CT scan; Copyright: PantherMedia  / Genrix20061.mail.ru

Doctors can use CT scans with less radiation to diagnose appendicitis

12/11/2021

A new paper in the British Journal of Surgery, published by Oxford University Press, indicates it's now possible to diagnose appendicitis using low-dose CT scans, decreasing the radiation exposure, which is of significant clinical importance especially in young patients.
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Image: Dr. Kolja Them and a MRI machine; Copyright: MOIN CC, Uni Kiel

Progress in the imaging of metabolic processes

11/11/2021

A research team in Kiel has developed new contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging in order to be able to make biochemical processes visible.
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Image: Professor Dr. Danny Jonigk and Christopher Werlein; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

New X-ray technique shows vascular damage in intact COVID-19 lungs for first time

05/11/2021

When the coronavirus enters the lung, it causes massive tissue damage. Now, an international research team has been able to demonstrate for the first time, using a highly innovative X-ray technique in a non-destructive manner, that severe COVID-19 causes massive remodelling of the finest blood vessels by causing normally separate blood systems to join together with unusual frequency.
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Image: Aerial view of the unfinished hospital in the savannah; Copyright: Dagmar Braun

Much-needed medical technology: a hospital for Togo

10/02/2020

If life has given you many blessings, you should share them with others – and you also need to be a little crazy. That's Dagmar Braun's point of view. She initiated the construction of a hospital in Togo, Africa. The country currently lacks the system required to deliver comprehensive medical care. Surgical equipment and gynecology devices are much-needed to compensate for these deficits.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Bild: Mann liegt auf dem Boden, vor ihm der mobile Roboter mit Tablet; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

MobiKa – programmed to help

22/05/2019

Many illnesses or old age require help with everyday tasks. Unfortunately, family members or caregivers aren’t always available to lend a hand. The MobiKa mobile service robot is designed to offer support, deliver motivation and improve the quality of life of those in need.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23/04/2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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