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Image: A man in a blue shirt is sitting at his desks and performs stretching exercises; Copyright: PantherMedia/Andriy Pipov

Everyday physical activity: out of shape thanks to the Corona pandemic?

22/09/2021

Social distancing, working from home, limited social activities: the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted many people to become more inactive, sedentary, and therefore more susceptible to ailments. Simple fitness programs and regular exercises can help counteract the negative effects of inertness. And paradoxical as it may sound, the pandemic also gives us the chance to get moving again.
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Image: Production of the new surgical masks that can deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19; Copyright: Asociación RUVID

Researchers release masks that instantaneously deactivate SARS-CoV-2

20/09/2021

Researchers released a new type IIR surgical mask with an intelligent fabric that can instantaneously deactivate the SARS-COV-2 virus that is responsible for COVID19.
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Image: Assistant Professor Yan Zhenzhen, Assistant Professor Zhang Limao and Professor May O. Lwin; Copyright: Nanyang Technological University

'Optimal strategies' computer model could significantly reduce future COVID-19 infections and deaths

17/09/2021

A team of scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a predictive computer model that, when tested on real pandemic data, proposed strategies that would have reduced the rate of both COVID-19 infections and deaths by an average of 72 per cent, based on a sample from four countries.
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Image: Stored in orange-capped vials for mass distribution, the drul buffer is part of an inexpensive salvia-based Covid test developed at Rockefeller; Copyright: Rockefeller University

Rockefeller saliva test for COVID-19 outperforms commercial swab tests

17/09/2021

Rockefeller’s Robert B. Darnell developed a in-house assay to identify positive cases within the Rockefeller community. Now, a new study in PLoS confirms that Darnell’s test performs as well, if not better, than FDA-authorized nasal and oral swab tests.
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Image: Hands of a man, who is sitting in front of the laptop; Copyright: PantherMedia/peus

Tool to drive collaboration in cancer and Covid-19 research launched

16/09/2021

The new cancer and Covid-19 research dashboard is a public resource that lists research projects looking at the impact of Covid-19 on cancer care and patients.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Machine Vision – The new navigation for spine surgery

15/09/2021

Precise, extremely quick and accurate – a new kind of navigation device in the OR uses a highly-developed camera technology to guide the surgeon through difficult procedures – directly in the OR. Prof. Ulf Liljenqvist, Chief Medical Director of the Clinic for Spinal Surgery at the St. Franziskus Hospital Münster, talks about his experiences in using the device.
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Image: Results of the RSF model in a chart; Copyright: Chinese Medical Journal

Calculated risk – A new tool to predict mortality in patients with liver failure

13/09/2021

A novel mortality risk prediction method could help tailor treatment decisions and transplant needs for patients based on their individual symptoms.
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Image: Staphylococcus aureus mrsa bacteria shown in a yellow color ; Copyright: PantherMedia/iLexx

Computer model may offer way to limit the spread of MRSA in hospitals

09/09/2021

A team developed a computer model that uses de-identified electronic healthcare records and laboratory test results to simulate MRSA transmission and predict inpatients' risk of infection. The model simulates the spread of MRSA through direct contacts, environmental contamination, and community importation.
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Image: Making a white face mask with blue elastic band ; Copyright: PantherMedia/ahfoto.mail.ru

Nanofiber face masks improve filtration efficiency, need replacing more often

08/09/2021

Researchers from Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen show that nanofibers are superb at capturing droplets in aerosol and bonded together after the aerosol is captured. The bonding is tight and irreversible, even after the captured droplets evaporate.
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Image: A female runner is kneeling at the roadside and using her smartwatch; Copyright: PantherMedia/I_am_Daniel

Running: how to prevent injuries with sensors and AI

01/09/2021

The most common injury that affects runners stems from overuse, not falls. Early warning signs include changes in motion. Successful injury prevention could pick up on this aspect by detecting and responding to these deviations at an early stage. It is the focus of the "Smart Injury Prevention" project.
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Image: woman wearing sports clothing stretches her leg, she wears a smart watch; Copyright: PantherMedia/Maridav (YAYMicro)

Wearables: smart helpers in sports medicine

01/09/2021

Heart rate monitoring, step-counting, sleep tracking: Wearable technologies keep evolving, offering more and more useful applications. Usually worn close to and/or on the surface of the skin, they are equipped with special sensors to detect and analyze information concerning physical signals or ambient data. This allows wearers to get immediate biofeedback.
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Image: Person on a treadmill wears a smart watch which shows his or her heart rate; Copyright: PantherMedia/apid

More than trendy accessories: training optimization with the help of wearables

01/09/2021

Wearables are increasingly being used in sports medicine, for example, to prevent injuries or to provide users individually with real-time data about their fitness and health. By analyzing this data, risks for sports injuries can be identified early and training can be customized to the user's needs and goals.
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Image: Scientist with pipette in laboratory ; Copyright: PantherMedia/alexraths

Genetic test better than blood test for cardiovascular diseases

31/08/2021

Determining an individual’s blood group based on genetic tests instead of merely traditional blood tests can provide a better picture of the risk of cardiovascular diseases.
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Image: Closeup view of an ecg ekg display; Copyright: PantherMedia/lucadp

Continuous heart rhythm monitoring and treatment if indicated does not prevent stroke

30/08/2021

Continuous heart rhythm monitoring – with anticoagulation if atrial fibrillation is detected – does not prevent strokes in those at risk.
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Image: Illustration shows the impact of cardiorespiratory fitness in childhood which has an effect on the Arterial Elasticity; Copyright: University of Finnland

Effect of metabolic syndrome traits on atherosclerosis can be reduced

25/08/2021

The deleterious effects of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors on arterial health can be reduced by increasing cardiorespiratory fitness already in childhood, a new study suggests.
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Image: NUS researcher Mr Douglas Tay in a hospital room at the NCID demonstrating how the Gesundheit II exhalation collection equipment is used; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Fine aerosols emitted during talking and singing may play a crucial role in COVID-19 transmission

24/08/2021

A new study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS), and conducted at the National Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCID), revealed that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) particles can be aerosolised by an infected person during talking and singing.
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Image: computer model of the tubular structures in the human heart; Copyright: SwRI

Computer model of inner heart structures

09/08/2021

The Southwest Research Institute and The University of Texas at San Antonio are collaborating to create a computer model of the intricate structures of the human heart as part of a larger effort to develop a new, potentially life-saving heart surgery.
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Image: A surgeon points at a screen that shows a roughly round shape; Copyright: PantherMedia/pitchayanank.hotmail.com

Medical imaging: obtaining an accurate view of blood vessels for surgery

02/08/2021

Surgical intervention is often inevitable when blood vessels become narrowed, blocked, or damaged. Surgeons use stents and medical balloons to open and widen the arteries, suck out the obstructing clots and use a catheter to examine the vessels. Intraoperative cardiovascular imaging is an essential tool to guide the catheters and instruments during the minimally invasive procedures.
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Image: A young male physician with a white coat sitting in front of a computer; Copyright: PantherMedia/DragosCondreaW

EHR alerts go unread, do not lead to deprescribing of medicines

12/07/2021

The vast majority of electronic health record (EHR) alerts attempting to reduce the prescribing of high-risk medications linked to dementia in older adults went unread in a study led by research scientists from Regenstrief Institute, Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine.
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Image: Graphic of two blood vessels with an aneurysm; Copyright: University of Leeds

Using virtual populations for clinical trials

29/06/2021

A study involving virtual rather than real patients was as effective as traditional clinical trials in evaluating a medical device used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research.
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Image: Rescue team in action; Copyright: PantherMedia/HayDmitriy

Mobile and intelligent – emergency blood analysis

08/03/2021

Things need to move fast in an emergency. Making the right call in this setting can be a challenge for emergency medical services – especially when symptoms are ambiguous, which is the case if a patient has difficulty breathing or exhibits a cardiovascular or poisoning emergency. A blood analysis is paramount to deliver a fast and accurate diagnosis. This is where mobOx comes in.
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Image: A physician with a tablet computer in one hand is standing next to a patient’s bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/Wavebreakmedia LtD

Hospital: how an AI tool could improve patient safety

22/02/2021

Sometimes, a hospital stay can proceed successfully without a hitch. At other times, there might be an unexpected turn of events if the patient exhibits complications. Early identification of these patients could prevent unnecessary suffering. A new research project intends to develop an AI-based tool that predicts a patient’s risk of complications at an early stage.
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Image: young woman sitting on the couch with a smartphone; Copyright: PantherMedia/Y-Boychenko

Gender medicine – analog and digital

10/02/2021

There are key differences between men and women, yet medicine has been treating both sexes the same for decades. As a result, women may not always receive the most optimal care. While there is now a shift in mindset, previous findings and outdated thinking patterns are far too often still finding their way into digital health services and technologies.
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Image: A surgeon is inserting a catheter into a blood vessel of a patient; Copyright: PantherMedia/chanawit

Atrial fibrillation: better outcomes with diamonds

15/12/2020

Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots and trigger strokes. To correct the condition, physicians use medication or surgical intervention by means of catheter ablation. This surgical method on the beating heart is a standard and safe procedure but there is always room for improvement.
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Image: The hand of a hospital employee at a device next to an intensive care bed with a patient in it; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

AI predicts a patient's risk of postoperative complications

22/10/2020

Whether it is a routine surgery or a personalized surgical intervention that perhaps has never been done before: There is always a residual risk involved. That’s why hospitals monitor and supervise patient care before, during, and after surgery to be ready for immediate intervention if needed.
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Image: man running in a lane on a sports field; Copyright: PantherMedia/stetsik

A Safe Return to Sports amid the COVID-19 Pandemic

22/06/2020

After professional sports and other sporting activities had been drastically limited to prevent COVID-19 spread, training facilities are now reopening to welcome recreational and competitive athletes. However, due to the ongoing pandemic, restrictions are still in place to lower the risk of human infection. EFSMA presents recommendations on a uniform approach to keeping athletes safe.
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Image: Ambulance on the road; Copyright: PantherMedia / inhabitant

Mobile stroke units: improved outcomes for ischemic stroke

02/06/2020

If someone is having a stroke, you call an ambulance. But getting to the hospital can be time-consuming. To prevent long-term disabilities and death, patients need to be treated as quickly as possible. According to a recent study by the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, mobile stroke units play a key role in this setting.
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Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02/06/2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
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Image: Surgeon sitting at a robot-assisted operating system; Copyright: panthermedia.net/wedmov

Robotic-Assisted Surgery with the daVinci-System

04/05/2020

Robotic surgical systems are often used to perform minimally invasive procedures. The daVinci surgical system is still one of the market leaders and is especially well suited to perform prostatectomies, a surgical option for prostate cancer.
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Image: person holding hand to the heart with a graphic depiction of a heart in front of them; Copyright: panthermedia.net/suriyaphoto

Cardisiography: A Non-Invasive Heart Screening Test

03/02/2020

Coronary heart disease can come as a complete surprise and occur suddenly. Cardisiography was designed to lower the risk and make faster intervention possible. As a non-invasive heart screening test, cardisiography offers the possibility of early detection for heart diseases.
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Image: Heart symbols are floating over a smartphone in the hand of a physician; Copyright: panthermedia.net/thodonal

Digital cardiology: analyzing data beat by beat

03/02/2020

Chronic cardiovascular diseases are a growing burden worldwide. Most of them are diseases of civilization that spread, where lifestyle is improving or where it is good already. But the healthcare systems are not growing equally to keep up with this development. We can make up for this by making cardiological care smarter with eHealth and mHealth.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03/02/2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprostheses: regaining independence and mobility

01/01/2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprostheses: between possibility and reality

01/01/2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprostheses. Endoprostheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprostheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01/01/2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: Cyclist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/rcaucino

Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01/07/2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: View of laptop screen with message that data was encrypted; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andriy Popov

Security first – hospitals prime targets of cyberattacks

02/05/2019

Safety should be a top priority when it comes to safeguarding human lives. That's why hospitals must protect their computer networks and data against unauthorized access. However, thanks to the proliferation of connected devices in hospitals, they are at high risk of suffering devastating cyberattacks. There is also a lack of cybersecurity awareness.
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Picture: Woman sleeping sideways in bed with a breathing mask; Copyright: Philips GmbH

Comprehensive Treatment: It’s All About Breathing

01/03/2019

Coughing, airway obstruction, difficulty breathing: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an umbrella term used to describe progressive and currently incurable lung diseases. The innovative solutions of Philips Respironics help patients to manage each stage of the disease and their medication intake, train the respiratory system and provide respiratory support.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01/02/2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02/01/2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: Woman with electrodes on her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03/12/2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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