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Image: X-ray of the hip with a hip fracture; Copyright: Booyabazooka

Booyabazooka

Mechanical stimulation could be used to prevent falls and strengthen muscles

24/01/2023

Mechanical vibrations could help improve our muscles and our balance control, according to research at Aston University. Researchers in the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences have examined the effect of stimulation on muscle spindles which ‘speak’ to the central nervous system to help keep us upright and walk straight.
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Image: Close up of female scientist in white uniform holding microtiter plate while working in laboratory, Copyright: gstockstudio

gstockstudio

New blood test differentiates neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease from other dementias

23/01/2023

A new blood test that can track and follow the neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease – and exclude other dementias.
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Image: The word

margaritaylita

AI detects rare forms of dementia

20/01/2023

Researchers at MPI CBS and University of Leipzig Medical Center have used new artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning techniques to detect rare forms of dementia on MRI images.
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Image: Two men in white coats are standing at a microscope in the laboratory; Copyright: National University of Singapore

National University of Singapore

Scientists identify blood biomarker for cognitive impairment and dementia

02/01/2023

A recent study by a team comprising researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the National University Health System (NUHS) revealed that low levels of ergothioneine (ET) in blood plasma may predict an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, suggesting possible therapeutic or early screening measures for cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly.
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Image: A doctor examines a brain scan in the laboratory; Copyright: XiXinXing

XiXinXing

Map of the brain's- and cerebrospinal fluid's immune cells

21/12/2022

Neuroscientists from the University of Münster have now generated an atlas that could change this: using it will allow to better understand disease mechanisms and to study the effects of therapies in a new way. This invaluable resource is provided as a freely available software for researchers all around the world.
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Image: Neurons from layer 5 of the motor cortex stained with a fluorescent dye.; Copyright: University of Freiburg

University of Freiburg

New findings on neuronal activities in the sensorimotor cortex

19/12/2022

An interdisciplinary research team at the University of Freiburg has found important clues about the functioning of the sensorimotor cortex. The new findings on neuronal activities in this brain area could be helpful for the further development and use of so-called neuroprostheses.
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Image: An elderly lady with a book in her hand is sitting in front of a device that produces light; Copyright: Image Point Fr/Shutterstock

Image Point Fr/Shutterstock

Multiple Sclerosis: light therapy relieves fatigue syndrome

15/12/2022

In a recent scientific study, a research group led by Stefan Seidel from the Department of Neurology at MedUni Vienna and AKH Vienna identified light therapy as a promising non-drug treatment option.
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Image: Top view of young female scientist examining blood while working in laboratory; Copyright: gstockstudio

gstockstudio

Optimal blood tests for development of new therapies of Alzheimer’s disease

14/12/2022

A new study has identified which blood tests are best at detecting Alzheimer’s disease during the earliest stages, and also another blood test that is optimal for detecting relevant treatment effects. These findings will speed up the development of new therapies that can slow down the disease progression.
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Image: Close up of three drill bits on gray background , Copyright: Empa

Empa

Sensitive drills for cochlear implants

05/12/2022

Hearing-impaired people whose auditory nerve is still intact can often be helped with a cochlear implant. But inserting the implant into the inner ear is not without risks, as facial nerves can be damaged in the process. Empa researchers have developed a novel smart drill that minimizes the risk by automatically shutting off when it comes near nerves.
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Image: A woman in an examination room has an electrode hood put on for an EEG measurement, Copyright: IfADo / Anne Gregory

IfADo / Anne Gregory

Working memory: Preparing for the unknown

02/12/2022

In a recent study, a group of researchers at Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at TU Dortmund (IfADo) shed light on the prerequisites for the initiation of motor preparation processes in working memory.
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Image: A woman sits at a desk in front of a laptop with

Karin Kaiser / MHH

Fighting depression with personalised medicine

01/12/2022

Under the leadership of Professor Dr Helge Frieling, Vice Head of the Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry and Psychotherapy at the Hannover Medical School (MHH), a national research network is now being launched that aims to tailor the treatment of depression more closely to the individual patient than before.
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Image: Looking at a neuropathological large slice preparation (from left): Prof. Dr. Albert Becker, Dr. Juri-Alexander Witt and Annika Reimers in the Institute; Copyright: Barbara Frommann/University

Barbara Frommann/University of Bonn

Unexpected cognitive deteriorations in epilepsy

29/11/2022

In severe epilepsies, surgical intervention is often the only remedy - usually with great success. While neuropsychological performance can recover in the long term after successful surgery, on rare occasions, unexpected declines in cognitive performance occur. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now been able to show which patients are at particularly high risk for this.
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Image: Medical team, three women, discussing results of X-ray or MRI scan of patient's brain in clinic medical office; Copyright: FoToArtist_1

FoToArtist_1

Warmer brain-irrigation fluid in surgery more efficacious

25/11/2022

A simple method can halve the number of repeat operations to remedy bleeding under the cranium, a study at the University of Gothenburg shows. The method is based on replacing irrigation fluid at room temperature with fluid at body temperature.
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Image: Hands holding a tablet with MRI scans of the brain; Copyright: Nikita_Karchevskyi

Nikita_Karchevskyi

Tumors: forecasting the risks of brain surgery

22/11/2022

Can surgeons quantify the risk of aphasia when removing a brain tumor? To find out, researchers at Klinikum rechts der Isar of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are analyzing the brain as a network. In a current study with 60 patients, they already achieved an accuracy rate with three quarters of their predictions.
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Image: Woman in medical hospital examines a x-ray screening image of the skull, Copyright: stevanovicigor

stevanovicigor

Flexible, steerable device placed in live brains by minimally invasive robot

31/10/2022

The early-stage research tested the delivery and safety of the new implantable catheter design in two sheep to determine its potential for use in diagnosing and treating diseases in the brain.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01/07/2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01/07/2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24/06/2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11/06/2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03/06/2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy uses robot arm in front of a monitor with computer game, next to it stands the therapist; Copyright: Helios Klinik Hattingen

Rehab with a robot – robot-assisted therapy in neurology

03/06/2019

It takes consistent repetitions if rehab patients want to relearn skills after surviving a stroke. This requires extreme effort. The industrial sector uses robots to perform repetitive tasks or handle jobs that require strength. What has been a fixture in factories for decades is now also making its way into rehabilitation facilities.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03/06/2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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