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Image: An image of colorful dots on black ground; Copyright: Reshetniak and co-authors

Visualization of protein mobility in the synapse

04/08/2020

Scientists in the Multiscale Bioimaging Cluster of Excellence have succeeded for the first time in simultaneously displaying the motion profiles of a large number of proteins in the synapse. Published in The EMBO Journal.
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Image: A colored image of a cell putting out long arms; Copyright: Washington University in St. Louis

New insights into wound healing

04/08/2020

When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis.
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Image: A physician is looking closely at MRI images of a human skull; Copyright: PantherMedia/beerkoff1

Scientists using AI to benefit cancer patients

03/08/2020

Case Western Reserve University scientists are developing artificial intelligence (AI) tools to help surgeons and oncologists identify the subtle but critical differences between a recurring tumor and damaged non-cancerous tissue on post-operative MRI scans of certain cancer patients.
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Image: graphic representation of the miniature optics inside a vein; Copyright: Florian Sterl, Sterltech Optics

Endoscopy: images from the inside of blood vessels

29/07/2020

Researchers of the Universities of Stuttgart and Adelaide in cooperation with medical research centers in Australia developed a special microoptical tool with a thickness of only 125 microns. This enables endoscopic examimations within blood vessels whose diameter is smaller than 0.5 mm and helps detecting plaques or thrombs to reduce the danger of a stroke or a heart attack.
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Image: detail of the new endoscopic device with protection against COVID-19; Copyright: Hiroyuki Endo

Endoscopy: new device provides added protection against COVID-19

27/07/2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown up unimaginable challenges for healthcare workers. Even simple outpatient procedures such as endoscopies can expose staff to the risk of infection. However, a team of researchers has developed a simple, disposable, and inexpensive device to provide an additional barrier of protection for healthcare workers performing esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD).
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Image: Schema of novel cancer tissue diagnosis in comparison with usual diagnosis; Copyright: Osaka University

Tissue imaging system accelerates cancer diagnosis

27/07/2020

Cancer diagnosis requires a lengthy process of multiple analyses of tissue biopsies, impeding the quick and early detection of cancers. In a new study, researchers from Osaka University developed a novel imaging system that uses near-infrared light to be less invasive and more time efficient than the conventional approach.
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Image: endoscope in an artery; Copyright: Simon Thiele and Jiawen Li

World's smallest imaging device focuses on a heart disease

23/07/2020

The camera-like imaging device can be inserted into blood vessels to provide high quality 3D images to help scientists better understand the causes of heart attack and heart disease progression and could lead to improved treatment and prevention.
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Image: Man looking at a medical scan; Copyright: PantherMedia / JCB Prod

Luminescent substance with nanoparticles for viewing of body parts

20/07/2020

A luminescent fluid that allows more accurate observation of different areas of the organism has been developed by a research team from the Colloidal Materials group of the Institute of Materials Science of Seville in collaboration with the Institute of Materials Science of Aragon, the Andalusian Centre of Medicine and Biotechnology and the Spanish National Accelerator Centre.
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Image: Colored and computer-generated images of tthe two lungs; Copyright: American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

CT of COVID-19 versus CT of influenza virus pneumonia

15/07/2020

An open-access American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) article investigating the differences in CT findings between coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia and influenza virus pneumonia found that most lesions from COVID-19 were located in the peripheral zone and close to the pleura, whereas influenza virus was more prone to show mucoid impaction and pleural effusion.
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Image: A black and white drawing of a cochlear implant; Copyright: PantherMedia/olga kuchevska

Improved cochlear implant allows MRI in children without discomfort

15/07/2020

A study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago found that children with a MED-EL Synchrony cochlear implant device can undergo MRI safely, with no discomfort and reduced need for sedation or anesthesia. Findings were published in the peer-reviewed journal Laryngoscope.
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Image: A montage of three pictures showing a tablet computer, an electronic component and a small round sensor; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Intelligent ultrasonic sensors for postoperative bladder monitoring

24/06/2020

After surgeries on the bladder, prostate or kidneys, a permanent irrigation of the bladder is often decisive for a successful healing process. An intelligent system called "VisIMon" was designed to support this. The Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT is developing the miniaturized ultrasound system for automated monitoring of bladder irrigation.
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Image: A couple of football players fighting for the ball on the ground; Copyright: PantherMedia/Erika Eros

MRI test for football players could detect CTE

22/06/2020

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a neurodegenerative disease caused by repeated head injuries often affecting athletes, can only be diagnosed currently through brain tissue analysis post-mortem. However, in a new study published in Brain, a Journal of Neurology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers present a new test methodology.
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Image: physician looking at X-ray images; Copyright: PantherMedia/jakubzak92

3D X-ray reveals secrets from inside bones

18/06/2020

The human bone is a wonderful and fantastic biological material. Bone tissue is highly specialized, with a structure optimized for specific functions in the body. Healthy bones are strong, they have a high carrying capacity, and they are hard to break.
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Image: medical image with advanced MRI of the brain; Copyright: UT Southwestern Medical Center

Neurology: advanced MRI scans may improve treatment

15/06/2020

Recently developed MRI techniques used to more precisely target a small area in the brain linked to Parkinson's disease and essential tremor may lead to better outcomes without surgery and with less risk of negative effects, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers suggests.
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Image: man lying in a bed with COPD sleeping mask; Copyright: PantherMedia / garyphoto

Undersized airways may be the reason why nonsmokers get COPD

11/06/2020

A new study of lung anatomy may explain why 1 in 4 cases of COPD - a lung disease most often linked to smoking - occur in people who have never smoked, a fact that has long perplexed researchers.
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Image: depiction of a knee joint; Copyright: University of Cambridge

MRI: scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments

11/06/2020

An algorithm that analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis. A team of engineers, radiologists and physicians, developed the algorithm, which builds a three-dimensional model of an individual's knee joint in order to map where arthritis is affecting the knee.
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Image: A young man with a bald head shows the scar of skull surgery; Copyright: PantherMedia/hplovecraft.mail.ru

Mapping immune cells in brain tumors with AI

04/06/2020

It is not always possible to completely remove malignant brain tumors by surgery so that further treatment is necessary. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now been able to describe the composition of the immune cells of various types of brain tumors. This will provide an important foundation for future immunotherapy approaches.
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Image: A large microscope on a laboratory table; Copyright: Georgetown University Medical Center

Device provides fast disease analysis in kidneys affected by diabetes

03/06/2020

The amount of scarring in damaged kidneys as a result of diabetes or acute injury, is a key factor in determining treatment. But it has not been possible, using traditional techniques, to quickly and accurately assess how widespread this kind of wounding extends within the organ.
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Image: Blurred image of a child that is pushed into a CT; Copyright: PantherMedia/Jayjaynaenae

CT findings of COVID-19 in children 'often negative'

02/06/2020

Largest case series (n=30) to date yields high frequency (77%) of negative chest CT findings among pediatric patients (10 months-18 years) with COVID-19, while also suggesting common findings in subset of children with positive CT findings.
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Image: An older man lies on the ground and presses a hand to his head, his wife kneels next to him and calls an ambulance; Copyright: PantherMedia/AndrewLozovyi

Stroke care: When every minute counts

02/06/2020

Stroke can affect anyone – older as well as younger people. The minutes after the stroke determine whether disability or death is the result. Only if acute care, inpatient treatment and rehabilitation are carried out in a targeted and effective manner, the chances are greater that only minor damage remains or that impairments even recede.
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Image: Female physician is looking a CT images of the brain next to a patient in an ICU bed; Copyright: PantherMedia/sudok1

Comprehensive stroke care: faster, closer, better

02/06/2020

"Time is brain!" – a fundamental rule in stroke care because time is of the essence when brain regions are undersupplied with oxygen and glucose. If circulation is not restored quickly, brain damage can be permanent. However, the key point here is not just to "be fast", but also to "use the time to treat stroke effectively".
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Image: The new medical device Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI); Copyright: IBI

Molecular Imaging: fast and reliable stroke detection

02/06/2020

After a stroke, a patient’s life depends on getting acute care at a hospital. Vital monitoring systems ensure safe and effective treatment. An innovative tomographic imaging system is designed to help prevent the patient’s risky journey to radiology and to enable bedside monitoring of cerebral blood flow.
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Image: A physician points to a screen showing an ultrasound image; Copyright: M. Jooss

Imaging: high-resolution 3D view inside breast tumors

01/06/2020

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. But individual tumors can vary significantly, presenting different spatial patterns within their mass. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München have now succeeded in visualizing spatial changes within tumors by means of optoacoustics. This method may be helpful for the future development of new drugs.
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Image: graphic explaining new double-contrast technique; Copyright: Xiandoing Xue, UC Davis

New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

28/05/2020

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
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Image: 3D imaging of the blood vessels of a mouse head using X-ray computer tomography; Copyright: Willy Kuo, UZH

Increased usability and precision in vascular imaging

27/05/2020

Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments.
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Image: smartphone in ophthalmological use in India; Copyright: Universität Bonn/Sankara Eye Foundation

mHealth: inexpensive retinal diagnostics via smartphone

26/05/2020

Retinal damage due to diabetes is now considered the most common cause of blindness in working-age adults. In low- and middle-income countries, an eye examination via smartphone could help to detect changes at an early stage. This is shown by a new study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with colleagues from Sankara Eye Hospital Bangalore (India).
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Image: Doctor holding a radiology image; Copyright: PantherMedia / pressmaster

COVID-19: Teleradiology enables social distancing

22/05/2020

Remote reading of imaging studies on home PACS workstations can contribute to social distancing, protect vulnerable radiologists and others in the hospital, and ensure seamless interpretation capabilities in emergency scenarios, according to an open-access article published ahead-of-print by the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR).
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Image: Man taking a close-up picture of a woman's eye; Copyright: Young Kim, Purdue University

mHealth: tool measures hemoglobin without drawing blood

22/05/2020

Researchers have developed a way to use smartphone images of a person's eyelids to assess blood hemoglobin levels. The ability to perform one of the most common clinical lab tests without a blood draw could help reduce the need for in-person clinic visits, make it easier to monitor patients who are in critical condition, and improve care where access to testing laboratories is limited.
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Image: computer reconstructed three-dimensionally inner ear; Copyright: Nordström et al.

X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease

21/05/2020

The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. Using synchrotron X-rays, researchers at Uppsala University have discovered a drainage system that may be assumed to play a major role in the onset of Ménière's disease, a common and troublesome disorder. These results are published in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Image: Graphic of a curve next to an icon for a youing and an old human and a human brain; Copyright: RIKEN

A new biomarker for the aging brain

15/05/2020

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) in Japan have identified changes in the aging brain related to blood circulation. Published in the journal Brain, the study found that natural age-related enlargement of the ventricles - a condition called ventriculomegaly - was associated with a lag in blood drainage from a specific deep region of the brain.
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Image: Man is holding an x-ray of the lungs in front of his chest; Copyright: PantherMedia/Jakub Jirsak

COVID-19: low-dose radiographs could reveal lung changes

14/05/2020

Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed an innovative x-ray method for lung diagnostics, which they now plan to test in one of its first applications for diagnosis of the respiratory ailment Covid-19 caused by Coronavirus.
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Image: 5 images showing cross section of nerves, an incision along the nerves and healthy nerve fibers; Copyright: Martin Bech

Unique 3D-images reveal the architecture of nerve fibers

07/05/2020

In an international collaboration led by Lund University in Sweden, researchers have used synchrotron light to study what happens to the nerves in diabetes. The technique shows the 3D-structure of nerve fibers in very high resolution.
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Image: young woman makes an ultrasound with the new system and shows patient the image on her smartphone; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Bonn

Ultrasound to go: versatile partner on hospital rounds

08/04/2020

The University Hospital Bonn has recently introduced an ultrasound device that's small enough to fit in your coat pocket. It's ready to use once you have connected it to a tablet or smartphone. The portable system makes bedside physical exams possible. The device primarily benefits students as it allows them to combine basic knowledge and clinical application.
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Image: A device with a large monitor and different control panels in a darkened laboratory; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA – PAMB

Cardiovascular diseases: using AI to navigate the catheter

09/03/2020

Treatment of a heart attack or stroke caused by vascular occlusion must be prompt to prevent further damage to vital tissue. Unfortunately, the actual treatment is often preceded by a lengthy catheter-based procedure where the cardiologist manually guides the catheter to the affected vessel. AI might perform this task in the future.
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Image: Endoscope capsule (left) next to an endoscope tube (right); Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

A new type of endoscopy – small, easy, comfortable

22/01/2020

Patients have to undergo a gastroscopy to rule out gastrointestinal conditions. Many dread this procedure since a thin, flexible tube is being pushed through the esophagus and stomach. Ovesco Endoscopy AG has teamed up with other project partners in the nuEndo research project to develop a capsule endoscopy device that is tiny, easy to swallow and makes the test more comfortable for the patient.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprotheses: regaining independence and mobility

01/01/2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01/01/2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: Digital twin of the lungs; Copyright: Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

ARDS: Testing Consequences without Consequence

14/11/2019

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening illness in which the lungs are severely damaged. The condition always requires intensive medical care through mechanical ventilation. But not all lungs are the same. To ensure a personalized treatment that is adapted to the individual patient’s lung volume and condition, Ebenbuild relies on digital twins.
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Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04/11/2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
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Image: A physician is standing in front of a floating image of the brain and is touching one point; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Igor Vetushko

Medicine 5.0: machine learning algorithms in healthcare

04/11/2019

Artificial intelligence holds the promise of salvation when it comes to medicine: it is meant to unburden medical professionals, save time and money and perform tasks reliably and tirelessly. But before AI algorithms are allowed to diagnose diseases, many technical and ethical questions still need answers.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22/07/2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24/06/2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11/06/2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23/04/2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01/03/2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Photo: Preview picture of video

Hybrid Imaging – Two Views of the Lungs

25/01/2019

CT scan, MRI or X-ray: All these methods allow doctors to see inside the body - including inside the lungs - and make a diagnosis. The clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the RWTH Aachen University Hospital uses a state-of-the-art gamma camera that combines SPECT and CT.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19/12/2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Interview with MedicalTek Co., Ltd.

15/11/2018

Many diagnostic and treatment questions can be answered with a glance inside the body. At the MedicalTek stand at MEDICA 2018, we learn how imaging systems in minimally invasive surgery can help physicians.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

The Future of X-Ray – Interview with PROTEC

14/11/2018

Since Konrad Röntgen discovered X-rays in 1895, this type of diagnosis has been part of everyday hospital routine. But what innovations will there still be in this area of imaging methods in 2018? PROTEC gives us an insight into the fascinating world of X-rays at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: preview picture of the video

Diagnosis in HD – Imaging at MEDICA 2018

14/11/2018

Whether CT, MRT, X-rays or ultrasound – imaging methods provide insights into the human body and are irreplaceable for diagnostics. They are part of everyday hospital life since a long time, but what is currently happening in this field? We took a look – at MEDICA 2018.
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Image: visitors at MEDICA; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf

See, experience, learn: what's new at MEDICA 2018

02/11/2018

It's time: the world's largest medical trade fair opens its doors from 12 to 15 November. More than 5,000 international exhibitors will present their new innovative products and applications. Frums, conferences and special shows will feature exciting specialist lectures and discussions that will give you an insight into electromedicine, laboratory medicine, medical technology and diagnostics.
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05/10/2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01/10/2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: diagnosis of the lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Sergey Nivens

With modern imaging supplies: A look into the lung

01/10/2018

Thanks to various imaging supplies, it is possible to make the inside of the body accessible for diagnostics, research and treatment. The lung, one of the most important human organs for survival, is also examined in this way. In our Topic of the Month, we looked at how doctors are getting a closer look at the lung, how the procedures differ, and which ones will be available in the near future.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01/10/2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: Two physicians are looking at a model of a vascular system through 3D glasses; Copyright: Brainlab AG

Smart Hospital: How devices communicate in the OR

03/09/2018

In a Smart Hospital, all devices are designed to be connected and integrated, thus increasing efficiency and reducing time loss – at least, that is how things are meant to work in theory. In reality, there are still countless vendor-specific point solutions that cannot be integrated. That's why there is a need for solutions that bridge the gap between the different applications and formats.
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Image: Silhouette of a head with a hole in the middle shaped like a puzzle piece. The puzzle piece is lying next to it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SIPhotography

WAKE-UP study a wake-up call for acute stroke care

08/08/2018

Some solutions are simple, though not necessarily obvious. The WAKE-UP study, which included 70 participating European stroke centers, has now studied a relatively simple procedure to manage the acute care of stroke patients and avoid potential long-term effects. Best of all, it is available wherever MRI is offered.
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Image: A man is working at a computer that shows a model of the human liver; Copyright: Fraunhofer MEVIS

AI in medicine: Machines do not learn like humans

01/08/2018

For years, medicine has been exploring AI techniques aimed at easing physician workload. While computers may not have the medical expertise and skills obtained through years of study, they can recognize patterns and specific features in datasets and draw deductions.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23/07/2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Biomechanical measuring systems – motion and posture analysis in orthopedics

21/06/2018

Biomechanical measuring systems are used in orthopedics to diagnose and treat misalignments and diseases. The Velamed Company uses its high-tech solutions to measure biomechanical parameters that enable a holistic analysis of human movement and posture. We took a closer look at how this works.
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Ventricular fibrillation – Using ultrasound to detect its causes

17/05/2018

Ventricular fibrillation is a life-threatening condition that occurs when the heart muscle exhibits a rapid, erratic beat. The cause might be a circulatory system disease or heart attack. Researchers in Göttingen are now developing an ultrasound technique to get to the bottom of ventricular fibrillation and cardiac arrhythmias and facilitate better treatment options.
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Image: Dr. Betsch next to a computer screen showing scans of the spine; Copyright: privat

Light and Bluetooth – dynamic measurement techniques for orthopedics

02/05/2018

X-rays for diagnostic imaging and therapy evaluation are still the norm in orthopedics. Meanwhile, patients who frequently need X-rays are repeatedly exposed to radiation. That's why the University Hospital RWTH Aachen uses and develops methods that are not just radiation-free but can also capture motions.
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Image: Young female radiologist is looking at pictures of the head and takes some notes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Radiology: machine learning to support medical diagnostics

08/03/2018

Automation makes work life easier in many ways but is it also a solution for analyzing medical images? Is a computer actually reliable enough to assist in the medical decision making process? Researchers in Landshut examine how machine learning algorithms can work more reliably and support radiologists.
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Surgical navigation systems – with precision to the destination

06/03/2018

With the help of surgical navigation systems, prostheses or implants can be better inserted. During the procedure, surgeons can see exactly where they need to operate on a screen. Just like a navigation system in the car, navigation in the OR guides you precisely to your destination. At the Uniklinik RWTH Aachen we can find out what advantages this has for physicians and patients.
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Image: Photograph of hands with hyperspectral imaging; Copyright: Diaspective Vision GmbH

Precision surgery thanks to informative hyperspectral imaging

08/02/2018

When body tissue is reconnected during a tumor operation in the gastrointestinal tract, surgeons need information about the current state of these so-called anastomoses. The new, non-invasive hyperspectral imaging technology now makes it possible to measure the crucial parameters during surgery and thereby increase surgical precision.
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Image: one of Fiagon's electromagnetic surgical navigation systems; Copyright: Fiagon

The surgeon's co-pilot: pin-point accuracy through electromagnetic navigation systems

04/01/2018

The position and alignment of surgical tools in the patient’s body must always be kept in view during the operation process to guarantee success and safety. With fine sensors at the tip of the instruments and an electromagnetic signal, Fiagon's electromagnetic navigation systems accurately reproduce their position in the body.
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Image: OR with very modern equipment; Copyright; Swen Reichhold

OR of the future: Surgical navigation systems and integrated devices

04/01/2018

While it is commonplace for operating room staff to work together as a team, the collaboration of operating room systems does not always work so well – many devices are still separated from one another, causing the OR processes to be prone to mistakes. The same applies to surgical navigation technologies that represent the interface between imaging, the surgeon and therapeutic devices.
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Image: Doctor with a laptop, around him various medical images, behind him an ECG; Copyright: panthermedia.net/realinemedia

Surgical navigation systems: Safely guiding the scalpel

04/01/2018

Imaging, navigation, integration – these are terms that describe the modern operating room. All of these components play a key role in accurate surgical procedures. They are integrated into surgical navigation systems, which make complicated medical surgeries considerably safer.
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