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Image: cells are placed on a microfluidic organ-chip; Copyright: Dr. Gad Vatine/BGU

Blood-brain barrier chip: using stem cells for the first time

18.06.2019

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.
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Image: microscope images of the human Blood-Brain Barrier-on-Chip; Copyright: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

Blood-Brain Barrier Chip: in vivo-like drug and antibody transport

17.06.2019

Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream.
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Image: A crab is running at a beach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wijuk Duangjomdee

Wound care: new nanoscale bioabsorbable dressing

06.06.2019

Scientists at Texas A&M University are harnessing the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss, from the hospital to the battlefield.
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Image: illustration of the production of tissues and organs with lithography; Copyright: F. Pampaloni, BRIGHTER, 2019

Tissue Engineering: producing tissue and organs through lithography

28.05.2019

The production of artificial organs is a hot research topic. In the near future, artificial organs will compensate for the lack of organ donations and replace animal experiments. Although there are already promising experiments with 3D printers that use a "bio-ink" containing living cells, a functional organ has never been created in this way.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Multi-organ chips: Drug research without animal testing at vasQlab

15.05.2019

New active substances that are suitable for drugs are initially tested in animal experiments. However, the results cannot always be transferred to the human organism. At the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Prof. Ute Schepers from vasQlab explains how active substances can be tested in human tissue without endangering human health.
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Image: Bioprinted model of a vascular network in a glass tank; Copyright: Jordan Miller/Rice University

Organ bioprinting gets a breath of fresh air

15.05.2019

Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues. The innovation allows scientists to create exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body's natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other vital fluids.
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Image: close-up of liquid metal drop, used to make the mini-centrifuge; Copyright: RMIT University

Organ-on-a-chip: mini-centrifuge for simpler study of blood cells

10.05.2019

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body. The new micro-device for fluid analysis will enable more tailored experiments in drug development and disease research via new 'organ-on-chip' systems.
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Image: sample of the 'Gut-On-A-Chip' Technology hold by a biomedical engineer; Copyright: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Gut-on-a-chip: personalized treatment for Crohn's disease

06.05.2019

To model human health and disease, organ-on-a-chip technology mimics the human body's organ structure, functionality and physiology in a controlled environment. These miniature systems, which serve as accurate models of various organs from the heart and lungs to the gut and the kidneys, can use a patient's own cells to test drugs and understand disease processes.
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Image: elderly laboratory worker holds a chip and looks at it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/matej kastelic

Microfluidic chip to better detect Ebola virus

06.05.2019

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections.
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Image: A red heart with two patches on it lying on an ECG print-out; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jakub Krechowicz

Implanted heart patch could limit muscle damage after heart attack

25.04.2019

Researchers have designed a new type of adhesive patch that can be placed directly on the heart and may one day help to reduce the stretching of heart muscle that often occurs after a heart attack.
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Image:Pig lung being irradiated with red light to inactivate viruses; Copyright: Cristina Kurachi

Radiation: eliminating bacteria and viruses

15.04.2019

A new technique for the decontamination of organs before transplantation using ultraviolet and red light irradiation has been developed by Brazilian and Canadian researchers and is described in an article published in the journal Nature Communications.
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Image: purple 3D human knee meniscus created using the ultrasound-assisted biofabrication technique; Copyright: Rohan Shirwaiker, NC State University

Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

12.04.2019

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.
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Image: mold of local teen Josie Fraticelli's hand that was scanned during the development of a personalized prosthetic; Copyright: Virginia Tech

Orthopedics: personalized prosthetics from the 3D printer

08.04.2019

With the growth of 3D printing, it's entirely possible to 3D print your own prosthetic from models found in open-source databases. But those models lack personalized electronic user interfaces like those found in costly, state-of-the-art prosthetics.
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Image: Construction of an organelle in a living cell for protein biosynthesis; Copyright: Gemma Estrada Girona

Laboratory technology: designer organelles in cells

01.04.2019

A research team led by biophysical chemist Professor Edward Lemke has engineered a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell in a new complex biological translation process. The created membraneless organelle can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionalities.
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Image: Picture of a new optical visualization of nano objects; Copyright: Kazan Federal University

Laboratory technology: New way of optical visualization?

01.04.2019

High-resolution optical microscopy methods promise breakthroughs in materials science, biology, and medicine. Today, their possibilities basically reach those of scanning electron microscopy.
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Image: Transmission electron micrograph of heart muscle; Copyright: WWU Münster - Andreas Unger

Laboratory technology: New heart muscle component discovered

22.03.2019

The heart exerts muscular force by contracting numerous contractile units of the heart muscle. Biologists at Münster University have found out that a specific motor protein is responsible for the assembly and mechanical stability of these contractile units in the heart. The study has been published in “The Journal of Biological Chemistry”.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09.07.2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23.04.2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01.06.2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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