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Image: view on the hands of a laboratory worker; Copyright: K. Dobberke für Fraunhofer ISC

Tissue Engineering: new ways to avoid animal testing

26.11.2019

Around 60 international experts met on November 7 at the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC in Wuerzburg to report on the state of the art in the field of 3D tissue models and prevention of animal experiments in the development of pharmaceuticals and medical devices.
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Image: printed test electrodes; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Wearables: mental disorder diagnosis and functional restoration

26.11.2019

NanoEDGE, coordinated by Fraunhofer IBMT, is a research project aiming at converging production techniques for functionalized electrodes with expertise in nanomaterial fabrication and characterization, state-of-the-art engineering, and neuroscience to pave the way for the production of multi-level sensors that can rigorously enhance the performance of established monitoring methods like EEG.
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Image: classified cells in comparision; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München / Carsten Marr

Blood cells: AI-driven classification

13.11.2019

Every day, millions of single blood cells are evaluated for disease diagnostics in medical laboratories and clinics. Most of this repetitive task is still done manually by trained cytologists who inspect cells in stained blood smears and classify. This process suffers from classification variability and requires the presence and expertise of a trained cytologist.
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Image: dna string; Copyright: MIPT Press Office

Genetic data: a method to standardize analysis

12.11.2019

MIPT researchers have collaborated with Atlas Biomedical Holding and developed a new bioinformatics data analysis method. The developed program, EphaGen, can be used for quality control when diagnosing genetic diseases. The team published the article in Nucleic Acid Research.
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Image: model bracelet with electronics for a wearable; Copyright: KAIST

Wearable: transformative electronics systems

04.11.2019

A KAIST team has designed a new strategy for electronics that will mechanically transform into a wearable electronic device. Imagine a handheld electronic gadget that can soften and deform when attached to our skin. This will be the future of electronics we all dreamed of.
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Image: virtual reality image of a finger pressing on a display; Copyright: HZDR / D. Makarov

Virtual reality: bimodal "electronic skin"

01.11.2019

Through the crafty use of magnetic fields, scientists from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the Johannes Kepler University in Linz have developed the first electronic sensor that can simultaneously process both touchless and tactile stimuli.
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Image: malaria infected blood cells under a microscope; Copyright: S. Kapishnikov

Microscope: malaria pathogen under X-ray

31.10.2019

Around 40 percent of humanity lives in regions affected by malaria, around 200 million people contract the disease every year, and an estimated 600,000 people die as a result. These pathogens are unicellular organisms that settle inside the red blood cells of their hosts and metabolize hemoglobin there to grow and multiply.
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Image: molecular simulation close-up; Copyright: Chan Cao, EPFL

Biosensor: made from a dangerous toxin

30.10.2019

Some types of bacteria have the ability to punch holes into other cells and kill them. They do this by releasing specialized proteins called "pore-forming toxins" (PFTs) that latch onto the cell's membrane and form a tube-like channel that goes through it. This hole across the membrane is called a pore. Punctured by multiple PFTs, the target cell self-destructs.
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Image: 3D-printed cell in a laboratory; Copyright: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech

3D-printing: finds cancer cells

29.10.2019

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.
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Image: triple-coaxial cell printing technology to construct biomimetic tissue-engineered blood vessels; Copyright: Gao et al.

Implant: 3D printing, bioinks create blood vessels

24.10.2019

A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks, which were formulated from smooth muscle cells from a human aorta and endothelial cells from an umbilical vein.
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Image: graphenes as wearable sensors; Copyright: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering

Wearable: Kirigami inspires new method for sensors

23.10.2019

As wearable sensors become more prevalent, the need for a material resistant to damage from the stress and strains of the human body's natural movement becomes ever more crucial. To that end, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a method of adopting kirigami architectures to help materials become more strain tolerant and more adaptable to movement.
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Image: Cells in a 3D scaffold; Copyright: TU Wien

Bioprinting: living cells in a 3D printer

22.10.2019

Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework. This is achieved using additive 3D printing methods - so called "bioprinting" techniques. However, some methods are very imprecise or only allow a very short time window in which the cells can be processed without being damaged.
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Image: model image of pathogens; Copyright: Sebastian Geibel

Pathogens: new insights in tuberculosis

10.10.2019

Researchers at the University of Würzburg and the Spanish Cancer Research Centre have gained new insights into the pathogen that causes tuberculosis. The work published in Nature provides the basis for a new approach in antibiotic therapy.
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Image: Printer head on a solvent-cast 3D printer depositing the functionalized polymer inks layer-by-layer from a needle; Copyright: Lehigh University/Stephanie Veto

Regenerative medicine: biofabrication for multiple tissues

01.10.2019

Organs, muscles and bones are composed of multiple types of cells and tissues that are carefully organized to carry out a specific function. For example, kidneys are able to filter waste from the blood because of how their specialized cells and tissues are arranged. Disrupting this organization dramatically affects how cells and tissues do their job effectively.
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Image: imaging chip detail picture; Copyright: Ella Maru Studio

Imaging: nanophotonic microwave imager chip

27.09.2019

Researchers have developed a new microwave imager chip that could one day enable low-cost handheld microwave imagers, or cameras. Because microwaves can travel through certain opaque objects, the new imagers could be useful for imaging through walls or detecting tumors through tissue in the body.
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Image: artificial skin on the index finger; Copyright: EPFL

Biotechnology: artificial skin for rehabilitation

27.09.2019

Just like our senses of hearing and vision, our sense of touch plays an important role in how we perceive and interact with the world around us. And technology capable of replicating our sense of touch - also known as haptic feedback - can greatly enhance human-computer and human-robot interfaces for applications such as medical rehabilitation and virtual reality.
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Image: tissue in a glass container; Copyright: Fraunhofer FEP

Implants: innovative multi-component procedure

25.09.2019

The Fraunhofer FEP has developed a process, called SULEEI, which makes it possible to sterilize and preserve decellularized pericardial tissue by means of photo-initiated ultraviolet crosslinking with low-energy electron irradiation.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01.02.2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Small brown mole on the back of a hand; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mario Hahn

Early detection: Tattoo signals cancer – and more

09.07.2018

People who are not ill and do not show any symptoms typically do not visit the doctor. And while most people know that preventive medical checkups for cancer, for example, are important, they still avoid them. They tend to be very hesitant because the doctor might detect a serious illness. In the future, a new type of implant could make it easier to go to a screening test.
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Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23.04.2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
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Image: In a movement laboratory, a man is wearing sensors on his legs and armst, while walking. During this he is being recorded and observed; Copyright: DAS BILD für ZHAW Gesundheit

"XoSoft" Project – Wearable Intelligent Exoskeleton

01.06.2017

After a stroke or as a result of aging, there are many situations when people are impaired in their walking ability and rely on a personal assistant or auxiliary aids and services. The XoSoft Project offers a solution: a soft exoskeleton that can be worn like a pair of leggings and stiffens or softens, depending on the situation.
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