News from the Editors -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

More about…

Image: printed test electrodes; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT

Wearables: mental disorder diagnosis and functional restoration

26.11.2019

NanoEDGE, coordinated by Fraunhofer IBMT, is a research project aiming at converging production techniques for functionalized electrodes with expertise in nanomaterial fabrication and characterization, state-of-the-art engineering, and neuroscience to pave the way for the production of multi-level sensors that can rigorously enhance the performance of established monitoring methods like EEG.
Read more
Image: 3D-printed cell in a laboratory; Copyright: Allison Carter, Georgia Tech

3D-printing: finds cancer cells

29.10.2019

Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells.
Read more
Image: triple-coaxial cell printing technology to construct biomimetic tissue-engineered blood vessels; Copyright: Gao et al.

Implant: 3D printing, bioinks create blood vessels

24.10.2019

A biomimetic blood vessel was fabricated using a modified 3D cell printing technique and bioinks, which were formulated from smooth muscle cells from a human aorta and endothelial cells from an umbilical vein.
Read more
Image: Cells in a 3D scaffold; Copyright: TU Wien

Bioprinting: living cells in a 3D printer

22.10.2019

Tissue growth and the behavior of cells can be controlled and investigated particularly well by embedding the cells in a delicate 3D framework. This is achieved using additive 3D printing methods - so called "bioprinting" techniques. However, some methods are very imprecise or only allow a very short time window in which the cells can be processed without being damaged.
Read more
Image: ink is applied to a carrier plate with a 3D-Printer; Copyright: Empa

3D-Printing: Wood on our Skin

09.10.2019

Physiological parameters in our blood can be determined without painful punctures. Empa researchers are currently working with a Canadian team to develop flexible, biocompatible nanocellulose sensors that can be attached to the skin. The 3D-printed analytic chips made of renewable raw materials will even be biodegradable in future.
Read more
Image: a 3d-printer at work; Copyright: panthermedia.net / prescott10

3D printing: new technique for biomaterials

03.10.2019

A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. Developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham, the technique could be used to print soft biomaterials that could be used to repair defects in the body.
Read more
Image: Two hands are holding a tubular frame that is carrying a glistening wet, white tube; Copyright: Leibniz University of Hanover/Institute of Technical Chemistry

Tissue engineering: how to grow a bypass

23.04.2018

A bypass is a complicated structure. It is either made of synthetic materials that can cause blood clots and infections or created by using the patient’s veins. However, the latter often does not yield adequate material. A newly developed bioreactor could solve this problem in the future. It is designed to tissue engineer vascular grafts by using the body’s own material.
Read more
Image: Preview picture of video

Health-i Award: The best ideas for the health of tomorrow

15.11.2017

The digitalisation of the health care system is making great strides forward. In order to give further impetus to this trend, the Health-i Award brings together experts from business, science and health. In the MEDICA ECON FORUM by TK three promising start-ups were presented.
Read more
Image: Surgeon is working at a simulator of the human back with two instruments; Copyright: HTWK Leipzig/Rebecca Schweier

RealSpine: realistic surgical simulation

22.02.2017

Surgeons need a great sense of touch. They first have to acquire this skill in simulation training before they can perform surgery on actual patients. Having said that, simulators are not just meant to teach the right movements; ideally, they should also provide a true-to-life experience of the surgical field – as is the case in RealSpine surgical training.
Read more