Current interviews -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Scientist works with medical test tube to analyze green liquid; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Diagnosing breast cancer through liquid biopsy

22/09/2022

Breast cancer diagnosis usually includes invasive testing with tissue biopsies. The samples have to be extracted from the cancerous tissue or cells. To make the process easier on the patients, the project LIBIMEDOTS is currently developing a different approach with liquid biopsy technology.
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Image: Microbiologist during an inspection of a petri dish; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Muscle models mimic diabetes, inform personalized medicine

21/09/2022

Abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) levels can result in Type 2 diabetes when things go awry with the body's skeletal muscle, which plays a key role in regulating glucose.
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Image: Long structure of DNA double helix shown in dept; Copyright: ktsimage

ktsimage

Ten new risk genes for Crohn's disease

20/09/2022

The results of the international study involving the Cluster of Excellence PMI also point to a previously unknown process in the development of this chronic inflammatory bowel disease.
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Image: Microscope in biotechnology laboratory with laboratory samples in the background; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Machine learning to unlock genomic code in clinical cancer samples

13/09/2022

A new paper from University of Helsinki, published in Nature Communications, suggests a method for accurately analysing genomics data in cancer archival biopsies.
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Bild: Two men in lab coats, Dr. Robert Zweigerdt and Professor Dr. Ulrich Martin, talk in the laboratory on equipment for biotechnology; Copyright: Karin Kaiser / MHH

Karin Kaiser / MHH

New cells for the diseased heart

13/09/2022

EU funds research project on cell-based heart repair with 6.1 million euros.
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Image: Thierry Nordmann (left) & Lisa Schweizer are standing in the lab, each with a pipette in hand and a microtiter plate in front of them; Copyright: Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Susanne Vondenbusch-Teetz, MPI for Biochemistry

Deep Visual Proteomics: tracking down cancer

08/09/2022

Proteins are frequently called the building blocks of life because they are found everywhere, including in our cells. This makes them an important factor when it comes to diseases. As a result, mapping the protein landscape can be a crucial ally in the fight against diseases. Now, a German-Danish team has developed a method that provides researchers with unprecedented insights into cancer.
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Image: The cryo-EM structure of the fully assembled T cell receptor (TCR) complexes; Copyright: Robert Tampé Goethe-Universität

Robert Tampé Goethe-Universität

Immune system: Image of antigen-bound T-cell receptor at atomic resolution

25/08/2022

With the help of cryo-electron microscopy, biochemists and structural biologists from Goethe University Frankfurt, in collaboration the University of Oxford and the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, were able to visualise the whole T-cell receptor complex with bound antigen at atomic resolution for the first time.
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Image: Artistic representation of the microenvironment in the bone marrow area; Copyright: Joana C. Carvalho

Joana C. Carvalho

Cell mapping close to the bone

24/08/2022

Deep molecular analysis of the bone marrow microenvironment reveals that the cells regulating blood stem cell maintenance are more diverse than expected and have features likely to be conserved between species.
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Image: Two smiling men are standing in front of a large, box-shaped device with a glass front – Prof. Niels Voigt, Dr. Thomas Mager; Copyright: mbexc

Many paths are open to neurons born early

23/08/2022

When it comes to royalty, things are clear: The monarch's first child inherits the crown. Siblings born later must make do with a less glamorous profession. This is quite similar for some nerve cells in the brain. In their case, it is the time of their emergence that determines their further career. This is shown by a recent study by the University of Bonn.
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Image: Comparison of cells treated with the fluoxetine-like molecule AKS466 and then infected with SARS-CoV-2, and only SARS-CoV-2 infected cells; Copyright: Jan Schlegel / University of Würzburg

Jan Schlegel / University of Würzburg

New target structure against Corona

22/08/2022

Fluoxetine, a common antidepressant, inhibits the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in cell cultures and in preparations from human lung tissue. This was demonstrated by researchers at Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in the summer of 2020. However, the mechanism of this inhibition was utterly unclear, so the teams continued their research.
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Image: Doctor and medical assistant at the bedside of a patient who has breathing problems and is wearing an oxygen mask; Copyright: DC_Studio

DC_Studio

Why some people get a more severe COVID-19 progression than others

22/08/2022

A team of scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at Charité (BIH) together with colleagues from the United Kingdom and Canada have found genes and proteins that contribute to a higher risk of severe COVID-19.
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Image: Human cells producing fluorescence-labeled mutant huntingtin; Copyright: Yasmin Richter

Yasmin Richter

New insights into Huntington's Disease

18/08/2022

Huntington’s chorea is a hereditary disease that leads to cognitive and motor impairments and death. Scientists at the University of Bremen have worked with international partners to elucidate the mechanism by which the mutated huntingtin protein can be kept at bay.
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Image: Two men in white coats, Dr. Gregor Hageluken and Dr. Martin Peter, are in the laboratory and examine pathogens; Copyright: UKB

UKB

Bacterial membrane transporter helps pathogens to hide from immune system

10/08/2022

The transport of substances across the membrane into the cell is linked to specific membrane transport proteins. Researchers at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB) and the University of Bonn, in collaboration with an international team, have now succeeded in elucidating the molecular structure of a completely new class of such membrane transporters.
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Image: Close-up of a brain MRI scan result; Copyright: Rawpixel

Rawpixel

Brain tumor cells invade the brain as neuronal free riders

08/08/2022

Scientists at Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg University and the German Cancer Research Center have discovered an elementary new spreading strategy in gioblastomas, the most aggressive of all brain tumors.
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Image: Illustration of cells and transfection variants; Copyright: Dr. Holger Erfle, University of Heidelberg, BIOQUANT

Dr. Holger Erfle, University of Heidelberg, BIOQUANT

Cell-protecting transfection of proteins and other macromolecules into living cells

04/08/2022

"Top-fase" is a simple and universal tool for the targeted transfection of numerous molecule species into cells and cell lines.
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Image: Illustration showing how an AI-based test method works; Copyright: Ryuji Kato

Ryuji Kato

AI detects whether drugs are effective for neurodegenerative diseases

01/08/2022

A research group from Nagoya University in Japan has developed an artificial intelligence for analyzing cell images that uses machine learning to predict the therapeutic effect of drugs. Called in silico FOCUS, this new technology may aid in the discovery of therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as Kennedy disease.
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Image: Micrograph of drying patterns of peptide solutions; Copyright: Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Peptide "fingerprint" enables earlier diagnosis of alzheimer’s disease

28/07/2022

Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease are caused by folding errors (misfolding) in proteins or peptides, i.e. by changes in their spatial structure.
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Image: Two smiling men are standing in front of a large, box-shaped device with a glass front – Prof. Niels Voigt, Dr. Thomas Mager; Copyright: mbexc

mbexc

Unique technology platform for cellular electrophysiology and optogenetics

26/07/2022

Electrical activity is one of the most important common features of the heart and the brain. The goal of the Göttingen Cluster of Excellence "Multiscale Bioimaging: From Molecular Machines to Networks of Excitable Cells (MBExC)" is to understand the functional properties of cardiomyocytes and neurons, which form the smallest electrically active units of both organs.
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Image: Photographed microscope in a laboratory; Copyright: svitlanah

svitlanah

Individual cells are smarter than thought

25/07/2022

Humans make decisions based on various sensory information which is integrated into a holistic percept by the brain. But how do single cells make decisions? Much more autonomously than previously thought, as researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown.
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Bild: A Full-scale four-chambered human heart model composed of single-micrometer fibers ; Copyright: Disease Biophysics Group/Harvard SEAS

Disease Biophysics Group/Harvard SEAS

Major step forward for organ biofabrication

13/07/2022

By recreating the helical structure of heart muscles, researchers improve understanding of how the heart beats.
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Image: Researchers work in a laboratory with a microscope and a laptop; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

How to find marker genes in cell clusters

08/07/2022

New method facilitates identification of cell-type specific genes in single-cell data: The thousands of cells in a biological sample are all different and can be analyzed individually, cell by cell.
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Image: A cell cultured on top of the nanowire scaffold.; Copyright: 2022 KAUST; Heno Hwang

2022 KAUST; Heno Hwang

Bone formation comes down to the nanowire

08/07/2022

A nanotechnology platform developed by KAUST scientists could lead to new treatments for degenerative bone diseases.
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Image: Cell culture plate in the incubator; Copyright: twenty20photos

twenty20photos

Human-robot-AI teamwork accelerates regenerative medicine

06/07/2022

A joint research group led by Genki Kanda at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has developed a robotic artificial intelligence (AI) system for autonomously determining the optimal conditions for growing replacement retina layers necessary for vision.
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Image: A man is holding to sample vials with a liquid that is glowing yellow, green and red in a darkened room; Copyright: Fraunhofer IAP

Fraunhofer IAP

Breast cancer: quick and gentle diagnosis through liquid biopsy

05/07/2022

If breast cancer is suspected, doctors carry out a biopsy. However, this is invasive, painful and costly. It also takes several days to get the results. In the future, diagnosis could be made via a liquid biopsy of a patient’s blood — a gentle, cost-effective method that would deliver the results within just a few hours.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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