Current interviews -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

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Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08.07.2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: doctor and assistant investigating patient`s data; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sabthai

Computer model supports cancer therapy

05.07.2019

Researchers from the Life Sciences Research Unit (LSRU) of the University of Luxembourg have developed a computer model that simulates the metabolism of cancer cells. They used the programme to investigate how combinations of drugs could be used more effectively to stop tumour growth.
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 Image: researchers on a laptop; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Monkeybusiness Images

Cybersecurity: Software uncovers vulnerability

05.07.2019

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories identified the weakness and notified the software developers. The issue has also been fixed in the latest release of the software. While no attack from this vulnerability is known, the National Institutes of Standards and Technology recently described it in a note to software developers, genomics researchers and network administrators.
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Image: schematic of stem cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

Cell therapies: homing instinct shows cells "home"

04.07.2019

In a world first, scientists have found a new way to direct stem cells to heart tissue. The findings, led by researchers at the University of Bristol and published in Chemical Science, could radically improve the treatment for cardiovascular disease.
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Image: patient with a knee injury; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Csaba Deli

Imaging: MRI scanner diagnoses knee injuries accurately

04.07.2019

The team say the device – which uses so-called "magic angle" effect - could potentially help diagnose knee injuries more quickly, and more accurately. In a proof-of-concept study using animal knees, the results suggest the technology could be used to show all the structures of the knee.
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Image: doctor in laboratory investigates medical samples of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Biomarker: test improves prostate cancer detection

03.07.2019

A team of researchers from UCLA and the University of Toronto have identified a new biomarker found in urine that can help detect aggressive prostate cancer, potentially saving hundreds of thousands of men each year from undergoing unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy treatments.
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Image: smart material wrist bands; Copyight: Paul Turner/Lancaster University

Wearables: real-time insight into wearers' emotions

03.07.2019

Smart wearable technology that changes colour, heats up, squeezes or vibrates as your emotions are heightened has the potential to help people with affective disorders better control their feelings.
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 Image: doctors hand on the monitoring system; Copyright: panthermedia.net/skvalval

Monitoring system: Body mapping treats damaged organs

02.07.2019

Medical advancements can come at a physical cost. Often following diagnosis and treatment for cancer and other diseases, patients' organs and cells can remain healed but damaged from the medical condition.
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 Image: Stretchable e-tattoo; Copyright: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin

Wearables: new e-tattoo enables heart monitoring for days

02.07.2019

A new wearable technology made from stretchy, lightweight material could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate than existing electrocardiograph machines - a technology that has changed little in almost a century.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: High jump of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Moodbaord

Training and rehabilitation: fit thanks to hover technology

01.07.2019

Amateur and professional athletes are susceptible to sports injuries, balance disorders or deficits in motor function and posture. Prevention and the right training can help avoid these incidents, while targeted therapy can support a return to sports after an injury.
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Image: The BlooDe device; Copyright: Université de Franche-Comté

Haematology: problems of anti-bleeding detected in 60 mins

01.07.2019

Researchers from the Universities of Geneva and Franche-Comté have developed an innovative device that investigates a patient's platelet capacity in near real-life conditions so that bleeding can be stopped (haemostasis).
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Performance diagnostics: success in sports – testing the limits of performance

01.07.2019

Stationary or mobile - competitive athletes rely on regular health assessments. They must deliver peak performance and be physically fit during competitions. But when do they reach their physical limits? Are there any devices that provide information, no matter where the test subject is located?
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Image: The contactless system passively can monitor the bedroom for an agonal breathing; Copyright: Sarah McQuate/University of Washington

AI: contactless system detects cardiac arrest

01.07.2019

Cardiac arrests often occur outside of the hospital and in the privacy of someone's home. Recent research suggests that one of the most common locations for an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is in a patient's bedroom, where no one is likely around or awake to respond and provide care.
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Image: View over the shoulder of a woman with a headset at her desk with two monitors and telephone; Copyright: Universität Basel, DSBG

Telemedicine: telephone-based coaching as an impetus for more exercise

25.06.2019

Sports scientists from the University of Basel found that providing telephone-based coaching over the phone is an effective method for getting people in Switzerland to adopt a physically active lifestyle.
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Image: Sketch-like representation of the Big Data concept - all data is transferred to a central server via a funnel; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Faithie

Open data: making science more verifiable

24.06.2019

The unrestricted availability of original data – so-called open data – on scientific publications is an important prerequisite for ensuring research results are verifiable and able to be used in the best possible way. Moreover, the reproducibility of results is crucial for the transfer of research findings into commercial or social application – which is the main concern of the BIH.
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24.06.2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Functional Imaging: The puls of modern oncology

17.06.2019

Medical imaging techniques have developed considerably in recent decades. In addition to morphological imaging techniques more and more functional imaging techniques are used in oncology that can continously record the functions of specific organs locally and regionally in real time. These are groundbreaking for diagnostics, therapies and preoperative preparations.
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Image: Reasearchers who developed FEAST to diagnose bacteria-related health conditions; Copyright: UCLA Samueli Engineering

Computational system: tool pinpoints gut's bacteria

14.06.2019

A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.
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Surgery devices: 'virtual biopsy' device detects skin tumor

14.06.2019

has developed a new "virtual biopsy" device that can quickly determine a skin lesion's depth and potential malignancy without using a scalpel.
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Image: Bacteria in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Bacteriology testing: Bacteria detected in minutes

13.06.2019

A discovery by researchers at the School of Life Sciences at the University of Warwick offers a new technology for detecting bacteria in minutes by `zapping` the bacteria with electricity.
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Image: doctor investigates skin of a patient; Copyright: panthermedia.net / belchonock

AI: diagnosis of skin lesions is superior to humans

13.06.2019

When it comes to the diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions, artificial intelligence is superior to humans. In a study conducted under the supervision of the MedUni Vienna human experts "competed" against computer algorithms. The algorithms achieved clearly better results, yet their current abilities cannot replace humans.
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Image: Hydrogel for wound healing; Copyright: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Wound healing: Molecular bait for hydrogels

12.06.2019

The team led by Brown School of Engineering bioengineer Antonios Mikos and graduate student Jason Guo have developed modular, injectable hydrogels enhanced by bioactive molecules anchored in the chemical crosslinkers that give the gels structure.
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Image: Woman undergoing a CT scan; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Tyler Olsonv

Machine learning: superior results for low-dose CT

12.06.2019

Machine learning has the potential to vastly advance medical imaging, particularly computerized tomography (CT) scanning, by reducing radiation exposure and improving image quality. Those new research findings were just published in Nature Machine Intelligence by engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and radiologists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
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Image: patient with Parkinson`s playing with a puzzle; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AndrewLozovyi

Ultrasound: restoring dopaminergic pathway at Parkinson's

11.06.2019

While there are several thousand drugs available to treat brain diseases, they cannot penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the brain. The BBB, which protects the brain from pathogens, also prevents most drugs from gaining access to the brain functional tissue, a well-known challenge to the treatment of all brain diseases including neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease.
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Image: DNA strands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Rost9

AI: method to improve rare disease diagnosis

11.06.2019

The team under Prof. Tom Lenaerts (VUB-ULB) of the IB² has developed an AI algorithm that makes it possible to identify combinations of genetic variants or abnormalities that cause rare diseases through computer analysis.
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Image: Woman investigates cell in a laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Cell analysis: deep learning dive to cell division

10.06.2019

Combining tissue imaging and artificial intelligence, Hollings Cancer Center researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina probed deeper into how cell division cycles are regulated, in this study released online in the May 2019 issue of Cell Reports.
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Shock wave therapy: Personalized treatment in orthopedic everyday-life

04.06.2019

Tendinitis, myofascial pain syndromes or fractures - shock wave therapy is a noninvasive method with no side effects that promises relief. The intensity of the shock waves can be customized to meet patients’ needs and yields fast positive results. In addition to advising doctor’s offices, clinical facilities, and universities, Kröner Medizintechnik GmbH also offers treatment, support, and care.
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Image: hand holding orange fabric; Copyright: University of Borås

Wearables: new method to evaluate comfort of smart and functional textiles

31.05.2019

Until now, user-friendliness has been the focus of the development of smart and functional textiles. Now it is time to address comfort when wearing these textiles – a quality factor that should be of interest to the industry.
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Image: Preemie in an incubator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ondroo

Intensive care: music helps to build the brains of preemies

30.05.2019

In Switzerland, as in most industrialized countries, nearly 1% of children are born “very prematurely”, i.e. before the 32nd week of pregnancy, which represents about 800 children yearly. While advances in neonatal medicine now give them a good chance of survival, these children are however at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders.
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Image: head of a man at a computer with two monitors; Copyright: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen

Big Data: algorithm predicts intensive care patients' chances of survival

27.05.2019

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Rigshospitalet have used data on more than 230,000 intensive care patients to develop a new algorithm. Among other things, it uses disease history from the past 23 years to predict patients' chances of survival in intensive care units.
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Blood test: How effective is stem cell transplantation?

24.05.2019

University of Maryland School of Medicine study shows the potential of transplanted stem cell secretions as a liquid biopsy.
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Image: Man with prostate cancer at the doctor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / imagepointfr

Diagnostic tests: Better detection of prostate cancer

24.05.2019

Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of male cancer deaths worldwide. Deaths from prostate cancer are primarily due to metastasized cancer, in which cancer cells have migrated through the body and begun to grow in other areas. Results reported in Biomicrofluidics, from AIP Publishing, promise a new way to detect this deadly disease through a simple, inexpensive device.
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Image: woman suffering from colon cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Tharakorn

Diagnostic tests: Identifying cancer treatment in five days

23.05.2019

UNIGE researchers have developed a cell co-culture platform that can reproduce a patient's tumour in 3D and test the best treatment combinations for its specific case in just five days.
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 Image: Abdelrasoul leads the research team of University of Saskatchewan; Copyright: Daniel Hallen, University of Saskatchewan

Wearables: World's first wearable kidney

23.05.2019

An artificial portable kidney that patients who have suffered renal failure could wear is to be created by a research team at the University of Saskatchewan with federal funding.
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Images: Researchers work with microscopes; Copyright: panthermedia.net / LightField Studios

Microscope: Technology revolutionizes drug development

22.05.2019

The search for new drugs to combat diseases more effectively could be revolutionised through a new £30 million electron microscopy project. Experts would be able to see, for the first time, how a particular drug works within a patient at a cellular level or the molecular processes set in motion by a genetic mutation.
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Image: New deep-learning model for lung cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / belchonock

AI: System spots lung cancer before radiologists

22.05.2019

Deep learning - a form of artificial intelligence - was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography (LDCT) scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.
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Image: Woman with dementia listens to music; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Assistance systems: AI radio for people with dementia

21.05.2019

Radio Me will address key causes of hospital admission for people with dementia, such as agitation and not taking medication correctly. As a result, it is hoped quality of life will improve, and people will be able to remain living independently at home for longer.
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Image: Girl with asthma; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Aaron Amat

App: Asthma tracking for children

21.05.2019

An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department.
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Image: Doctor analyzes images of brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / EvgeniyShkolenko

Neuroimaging: Big data helps improve diagnosis accuracy

20.05.2019

A team of researchers from Osaka University and The University of Tokyo developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG.
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Image: Preemie in an incubator; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ondroo

Quieter ICUs are better for infants

17.05.2019

Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable. To help preterm infants make a smooth transition to life outside of the womb, some NICUs have instituted set quiet times to limit children's exposure to potentially dangerous levels of noise.
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Image: A man is pointing an infrared thermometer at a baby; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olegkalina

Precise temperature measurements with invisible light

16.05.2019

Ordinarily, you will not encounter a radiation thermometer until somebody puts one in your ear at the doctor's office or you point one at your forehead when you are feeling feverish.
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Image: woman with breast cancer and child in her arms; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ArturVerkhovetskiy

AI: Novel method predicts future risk of breast cancer

14.05.2019

Researchers from two major institutions have developed a new tool with advanced artificial intelligence (AI) methods to predict a woman's future risk of breast cancer.
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Image: graphic of cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wolfgang Rieger

Analyser system: New approach catalogues vast cell number

14.05.2019

Data-sampling method makes "sketches" of unwieldy biological datasets while still capturing the full diversity of cell types. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.
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Image: doctor holds hand of a patient with Parkinson`s disease; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ocskaymark

Diagnostics: Novel device for Parkinson’s disease

13.05.2019

Presently there are no disease-modifying therapies for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease; however, one potential strategy for treatment is to prevent α-synuclein aggregation. As a first step, researchers at Osaka University have developed a device that can assess the degree of α-synuclein aggregation in the brain.
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Image: doctor points at an brain imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sudok1

Imaging: New technique uses protein of scorpion venom

13.05.2019

A novel imaging technique that uses a synthesized form of scorpion venom to light up brain tumors has shown promise in a clinical trial. The imaging system enables neurosurgeons to better see malignant growths that often are difficult to fully eliminate.
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Image: man in nursing home in wheelchair stroking a dog; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Robopets can benefit health and wellbeing of elderly

09.05.2019

Researchers found evidence that 'robopets' can provide comfort and pleasure and reduce agitation and loneliness. Funded by NIHR Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care South West Peninsula PenCLAHRC), the study also found that robopets increase social interaction with other residents, family members and staff, often through acting as a stimulus for conversation.
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Image: Wrist with smartwatch, which measures the pulse rate; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

mHealth: Atrial fibrillation detection – App supports heart health

08.05.2019

Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of persistent cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heart rhythm). Researchers estimate that 1.8 million Germans are presently affected by this disease. The condition is difficult to diagnose, frequently goes undetected and may result in a stroke. A new smartwatch medical app is designed to help patients detect atrial fibrillation before it’s too late.
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Image: Doctor is investigating kidney disease; Copyright: panthermedia.net / NataliMis

Analzing system: Breakthrough designation KidneyIntelX™

03.05.2019

Renalytix AI plc (AIM: RENX), a developer of artificial intelligence-enabled clinical diagnostics for kidney disease, announces that it has been granted Breakthrough Device designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for its lead diagnostic, KidneyIntelX™. This is the first such designation for an AI-enabled diagnostic for kidney disease publicly announced by any company.
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Image: hand desinfection; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Andriy Popov

15 seconds for a healthier life - World Hand Hygiene Day 2019

03.05.2019

What can be done in 15 seconds? 15 seconds is a short time and yet these seconds can save lives. Not only people in everyday life, but also the personal of hospitals should take this time to disinfect hands regularly. On the 5th May 2019 is "International Hand Hygiene Day". This day intends to remind society that regular hand hygiene can protect people from infectious diseases.
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Image: Key of security; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Kheng Ho Toh

Cybersecurity: New chip stops attacks before they start

03.05.2019

A new computer processor architecture developed at the University of Michigan could usher in a future where computers proactively defend against threats, rendering the current electronic security model of bugs and patches obsolete.
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Image: Doctors investigating scans of lung imaging; Copyright: panthermedia.net / likstudio

Imaging: Deep-learning model for lung cancer

02.05.2019

A deep-learning model developed using serial image scans of tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicted treatment response and survival outcomes better than standard clinical parameters.
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Image: Graphic of a spinglass of human gene interactions; Copyright: Graeme Benstead-Hume, University of Sussex

Computational system: Algorithms for cancer treatments

02.05.2019

While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes.
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Image: Stetoscope on a medical document about ovarian cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Premium shots

Imaging: System helps to remove tiny ovarian tumors

01.05.2019

Ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed only after it has reached an advanced stage, with many tumors spread throughout the abdomen. Most patients undergo surgery to remove as many of these tumors as possible, but because some are so small and widespread, it is difficult to eradicate all of them.
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Image: AI analyzes diabetic ratinopathy; Copyright: panthermedia.net / peshkova

mHealth: Smartphone AI detects diabetic retinopathy

01.05.2019

Researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center revealed that combining a smartphone-mounted device that takes high-quality retinal pictures with artificial intelligence software that reads them, can determine in real- time whether a patient should be referred to an ophthalmologist for follow-up.
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Image: Doctor and patient carrying out hand exercises; Copyright: panthermedia.net / photographee.eu

Physiotherapy: Quality post-stroke rehabilitation system

30.04.2019

Researchers of Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences (LSMU) and Italian high-tech company Gruppo Fos Lithuania are developing a technology for the personalised care of the patients who have experienced a stroke. After collecting data of physiological parameters, the multimodal system will choose personalised rehabilitation solutions for each patient.
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Image: laboratory devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Diagnostics: Test for effective treatment of breast cancer

30.04.2019

A breast cancer test has been found that helps doctors make treatment decisions for some breast cancer patients, following research carried out at Queen Mary University of London and funded by Cancer Research UK.
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Image: Child suffering from cancer; Copyright: panthermedia.net / frantab

Software: Advanced radiation therapy for children

29.04.2019

Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles continue to lead the field of radiation oncology by pushing the leading edge of technological advances. A new report by Arthur Olch, PhD, highlights use of specialized software that could advance treatment accuracy for pediatric cancer patients.
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Image: Men at the sea plays the mobile game Sea Hero Quest; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd

mobile Health: Game detects Alzheimer's risk

29.04.2019

A specially designed mobile phone game can detect people at risk of Alzheimer's - according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied gaming data from an app called Sea Hero Quest, which has been downloaded and played by more than 4.3 million people worldwide.
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Image: An ELISA test strip is compared to a coloured scale; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexraths

Software aims to reduce variability in ELISA biomarker tests

24.04.2019

A new computational approach has been developed to reduce variability in common research biomarker tests, a promising step in improving the ability of biomedical researchers and basic scientists to reproduce data and facilitate more consistent results across laboratories and long-term projects.
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Image: Hand with a pincer holds a small white implant; Copyright: Iris Maurer

ENT: new adhesive structures for medical applications

23.04.2019

In cooperation with the Saarland University Hospital, the INM has developed bioinspired adhesive structures for the treatment of eardrum injuries. The adhesive structures are now to be transferred into a biomedical product.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01.04.2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01.04.2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01.04.2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: Ellipsoid of revolution with a gold coating to detect backscattered photons from the skin tissue; Copyright: Sven Delbeck/Fachhochschule Südwestfalen

Blood Sugar Monitoring: Using Infrared Instead of Invasive Techniques

22.03.2019

Over six million people in Germany have diabetes. It is estimated that almost 400 million people are affected by this disease worldwide. Diabetes sufferers must prick their fingers several times a day to monitor their blood sugar.
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Image: Leg implants; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ monstArrr

Orthopedic implant: More comfortable thanks to full weight-bearing capacity

08.03.2019

Orthopedic implants – they are a necessity when it comes to congenital or acquired limb length discrepancies. However, full weight-bearing during the limb lengthening process is not feasible with previous implant models. For the first time, the 3D Surgery division at the Medical Center of the University of Munich has succeeded in using an implant that facilitates immediate weight-bearing.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01.03.2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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Image: senior coughing man with cigarette; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ljsphotography

All-round care for COPD: diagnosis, treatment, self-management

01.03.2019

COPD affects more than 200 million people in the world. Those affected by this chronic pulmonary disease are often slow to notice the symptoms and get a medical diagnosis. This results in secondary complications and high medical costs. That's why an early diagnosis, comprehensive treatment, and frequent monitoring are very important. Various devices and tools support this all-round care.
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Image: Dosage inhaler and stethoscope in front of a shelf; Copyright: panthermedia.net/liudmilachernetska@gmail.com

React early, breathe free – comprehensive COPD management

01.03.2019

COPD is considered the third most common cause of death worldwide and mainly affects smokers. It is not curable, but with the right combination of early diagnosis, therapy and self-management, a significant part of the quality of life can be regained. The comprehensive care is supported by various devices and technical tools. Learn more about the all-round care of COPD in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01.02.2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Cells in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / devserenco

Organ-on-a-chip - the mini organs of the future?

01.02.2019

So far in vitro methods and animal experiments have been used to determine the causes of diseases, research therapeutic approaches and predict the effect of drugs. Organ-on-a-chip models now offer a more accurate and ethically justifiable alternative. Find out more about the models, their advantages and future developments in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Woman at her desk holding her back; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Andrey Popov

AI ensures dynamic sitting

22.01.2019

Whether in the office, at school or behind the wheel: we spend a lot of time sitting and often stay in the same position for too long. The possible side effects are stiffness, back problems and pain. The SensA-Chair smart seating solution combats decreased mobility and ensures dynamic sitting.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08.01.2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02.01.2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02.01.2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: Woman with diabetes and a sensor; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Click and Photo

Blood glucose monitoring of tomorrow - modern diabetes therapies

02.01.2019

There are 425 million people with diabetes in the world. Heart problems, kidney failure or blindness - these can all be consequences of the metabolic disease. Diabetes patients now have the possibility of being treated digitally.
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Image: Physician attaches electrodes to the upper back of a young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/microgen

Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation: pain relief with electricity

03.12.2018

According to estimates, every third person in the world suffers from chronic pain. The most common discomforts include back pain, headaches, and nerve pain. For many sufferers, the pain is so severe that it impacts their job, social life or mind. The pain has its own clinical significance and must be treated – with electric current for example.
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Image: Woman with electrodes on her head; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Electrical Effectiveness - healing methods alongside conventional Medicine

03.12.2018

Conventional medicine is taught at universities and is generally acknowledged. But other therapies have also proven their worth, such as electrical healing methods, which contribute to recovery and a better quality of life. In our Topic of the Month you learn about in which cases they are used, what their benefits are and what the current status of these methods is on the medical market.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03.12.2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02.11.2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image: Robots and Artificial Intelligence; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sdecoret

"Dr. Algorithm suggests the best treatment option"

02.11.2018

The technology of the 20th century is progressing faster than ever – and this also applies to technology in the field of medicine. That’s why it is only a matter of time before hospitals are fully driven by artificial intelligence - data-driven medicine that suggests the best treatment and facilitates zero error surgeries. A path that doesn’t just require openness!
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22.10.2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image: Radiology assistant presses a button at the front of a CT; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Lung cancer: Screening with low-Dose CT scans

01.10.2018

Lung cancer is one of the most common and deadliest cancers. The symptoms tend to be non-specific, often causing its detection to be too late. Currently, there is no comprehensive screening. This could change with the use of low-dose CT scans. It should be noted that this is not just an issue of technical feasibility. A screening test must also make sense from a health policy perspective.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22.08.2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23.07.2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: Female hospital employee with green OR cap is wearing AR glasses, a screen is floating in front of her; Copyright: IT4process GmbH

Augmented Reality: supporting sterile processing services?

08.06.2018

Every day, hospital staff has to manage complex processes to guarantee quality and patient safety. Yet in some areas, the use of checklists and manuals tends to be more cumbersome and not useful – as is the case in sterile processing. A new project studies how augmented reality can take all the necessary information into the staff's field of view.
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01.02.2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20.12.2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: Computer keyboard where one key has been replaced by the CE symbol with the flag of the EU; Copyright: panthermedia.net/NiroDesign

When is a medical device considered to be a medical device? – Certification, norms, and standards

01.12.2017

To ensure product quality and patient safety, medical devices must meet specific requirements outlined in the Medical Devices Act and specified EU directives. Yet which norms and standards must actually be met and how is this verified?
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Point-of-care testing in the hospital – quality diagnostic results

18.10.2017

Point-of-care testing is an integral part of medicine. It enables simple, automated testing that yields fast results. Hospitals have also started to increasingly use POCT diagnostic systems over the past few years. We are guests at the Greifswald University Hospital where patient-side rapid diagnostic tests have already been successfully integrated into daily hospital operations.
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Image: A large stone is blocking a path that leads through a green meadow; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Brigitte Götz

Medical devices: the road to the finished product is not easy

08.09.2017

These days, many groups make various demands of medical device developers: manufacturers, users, patients and government agencies. Given all of these interests and concerns, the developers face many challenges. In this interview, we put some of them under the microscope and examine how they can be sidestepped or entirely avoided.
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Image: Colored sonographic image of the human heart from Doppler ultrasonography; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Belish

Imaging techniques: ultrasound, MRI, CT, catheters and other procedures to keep a healthy heart

01.09.2017

Many people are affected by heart disease today because - among other reasons- our modern unhealthy lifestyle is taking a toll on our hearts. A reliable diagnosis and treatment are crucial for patients with heart disease since all other organs depend on the pumping of our vital organ. Modern imaging techniques are a key to understanding the heart.
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Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01.09.2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08.08.2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: POCT-device and patient files; Copyright: panthermedia.net/gabriella

Point-of-care testing: helpful when things need to happen quickly?

01.08.2017

Advances in technology and analysis techniques, as well as the increasing miniaturization of laboratory equipment and processes, make it possible: patient-side laboratory testing, better known as point-of-care testing or POCT. There are many POCT projects and all of them promise a rapid diagnosis as well as economic advantages. But are these tests also suited for everyday medical testing?
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Image: A dermatology laser is used to remove a mole; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Michael Krause

Laser surgery: usability, flexibility, treatment quality

03.07.2017

The scalpel is considered the classic surgical instrument and as such, has remained unchanged for quite some time. However, today’s technology opens up a world of new possibilities for cutting tissue. Next to high-frequency electrosurgical scalpels that work with electric power, surgeons also use a variety of different lasers. They promise great usability and better treatment.
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Image: An eye surgeon and an assistant are treating a patient with a surgical laser; Copyright: University Hospital Dresden/Felix Koopmann

Eye surgery: precision and prevention with femtosecond lasers

03.07.2017

Precision work is absolutely essential in eye surgery since the surgical site is very minute and sensitive. This is why eye surgeons have been using lasers for years. Femtosecond lasers are especially well suited to serve this purpose because they are able to cut tissue with great precision and little energy, which prevents unwanted side effects of surgery.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22.06.2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Hospital hygiene - Little helper tool for hand disinfection

04.05.2017

The main weak spot in hand disinfection at hospitals is that it is either not or not properly carried out. Oftentimes, the reason is that employees lack the time to do it right. The HELIOS University Hospital Wuppertal now uses a little helper to motivate staff members to correctly disinfect hands. MEDICA-tradefair.com took their camera to watch how this works.
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Image: Man typing on virtual question marks; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sebastien decoret

FAQ: Some questions concerning India

02.05.2017

There are recurring questions that companies are seeking to invest or produce in India. Here are some questions and their answers.
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Image: Young Indian woman in yellow sari talking on mobile phone; Copyright: panthermedia.net / iphemant

Medical Technology for India – Market of the Future?

02.05.2017

India is a land of contradictions. On the one hand, it has densely populated cities with state of the art technology. On the other hand, two-thirds of the population still live under challenging hygienic and financial conditions in the rural areas. Despite these conditions or perhaps because of them, more and more medical technology companies from all over the world are interested in this market.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03.04.2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: Look over the shoulder of an eye surgeon who is operating at a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mearicon

Ophthalmology today and tomorrow: surgery and more

01.02.2017

Ophthalmology procedures and eye surgeries have been around since ancient times. Today we can hardly imagine the types of circumstances that surrounded any surgical procedures to our perhaps most important sense organ in those days and later eras. Meanwhile, the present and future of this medical specialty looks all the more promising.
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Image: Single room with a window in a hospital; Copyright: panthermedia.net/epstock

Hospital construction: infection prevention through architecture?

09.01.2017

Hospitals apply many infection prevention and control measures. They all have one thing in common: they are individual parts of an overall concept that is aimed at preventing the spread of highly infectious and resistant pathogens in hospitals. Nevertheless, previous hygiene concepts ignore one aspect of hospitals: the architecture of the actual hospital facility itself.
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