Current interviews -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23.03.2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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 Image: A group of female and male researchers in a laboratory; Copyright: Phil Jones, Augusta University

Novel coronavirus test provides fast, accurate results

23.03.2020

The Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia Department of Pathology has developed a novel, accurate coronavirus test that can tell patients if they are infected within about two hours instead of waiting typically days to hear from remote testing facilities.
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 Image: Different technical devices that are connected by cables; Copyright: UMass Amherst

AI device collects health data for flu and pandemic forecasting

23.03.2020

University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers have invented a portable surveillance device powered by machine learning - called FluSense - which can detect coughing and crowd size in real time, then analyze the data to directly monitor flu-like illnesses and influenza trends.
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Image: Face masks to protect humans from viruses, like corona; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mouse family

Recyclable face masks to better protect against corona

20.03.2020

Wearing a face mask is a common sight in Korea during the COVID-19 outbreak. Due to the overwhelming demand, last week the government started to ration two masks per person per week, as a drastic measure to address the supply fiasco. The face masks most commonly used are disposable ones, originally made for filtering out up to 94 or 95 percent of fine dust, referred to as N94 or N95 masks.
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Image: Young woman uses app for Coronavirus tracking; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Antonio Guillem

Telemedicine: Coronavirus mobile app for contact tracing

19.03.2020

A team of medical research and bioethics experts at Oxford University are supporting European governments to explore the feasibility of rapidly and widely deploying a coronavirus mobile app for instant contact tracing.
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 Image: Laboratory analysis of DNA; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sergunt

Genetic screening: New CRISPR technology to target RNA viruses

17.03.2020

New genetic screening platform using CRISPR technology for targeting thousands of genes in a massively-parallel fashion; accurate and fast method of finding best guides to detect, target, and knockdown specific RNA targets.
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Image: Scientists using AI; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AndrewLozovyi

AI and human knowledge for faster, better cancer diagnosis

16.03.2020

A new system combining artificial intelligence (AI) with human knowledge promises faster and more accurate cancer diagnosis. The powerful technology, developed by a team led by engineering researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses digital images of tissue samples to match new cases of suspected cancer with previously diagnosed cases in a database.
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Image: Medical diagnostics on coronavirus; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vasyl Faievvch

Diagnostic tool: Rapid response coronavirus test

16.03.2020

Hackensack Meridian Health, New Jersey's largest and most comprehensive health network, is pleased to announce that the Center for Discovery and Innovation (CDI) has created a test to dramatically reduce the time it takes for diagnosing COVID-19. This is a major advance that will benefit patients, create a more effective triage system in hospitals and better control the spread of disease.
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Image: colorful graphic of a virus’ structure; Copyright: University of Basel, Computational Pharmacy

Coronavirus: virtual screening for active substances

13.03.2020

The University of Basel is part of the global search for a drug to fight the rampant coronavirus. Researchers in the Computational Pharmacy group have so far virtually tested almost 700 million substances, targeting a specific site on the virus – with the aim of inhibiting its multiplication.
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Image: two men in front of a whiteboard with

Coronavirus: app for rapid at-home assessment

09.03.2020

A coronavirus app coupled with machine intelligence will soon enable an individual to get an at-home risk assessment based on how they feel and where they've been in about a minute, and direct those deemed at risk to the nearest definitive testing facility, investigators say.
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Image: Close-up of a tubular structure ; Copyright: Professor Alvaro Mata

3D printing of tissue-like vascular structures

06.03.2020

In a new study published today in Nature Communications, led by Professor Alvaro Mata at the University of Nottingham and Queen Mary University London, researchers have developed a way to 3D print graphene oxide with a protein which can organise into tubular structures that replicate some properties of vascular tissue.
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Image: Nanopore sequencer for DNA analysis; Copyright: Courtesy of Fraunhofer IGBI

DNA: sequencing technique shortens diagnosis of sepsis

05.03.2020

A report in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new technique that uses real-time next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze tiny amounts of microbial cell-free DNA in the plasma of patients with sepsis, offering the possibility of accurate diagnosis of sepsis-causing agents within a few hours of drawing blood.
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Image: simulated bacterium propelling itself along using flagella pointing forwards and behind; Copyright: Sarah Mohammadinejed, University of Göttingen

Immunology: swimming bacteria

02.03.2020

The magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus swims with the help of two bundles of flagella, which are thread-like structures. The bacterial cells also possess a sort of intracellular "compass needle", meaning that their movements can be controlled using a magnetic field.
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Image: immune cells counting each other; Copyright: Northwestern University

Immunology: cells consult each other to make decisions

14.02.2020

Scientists and physicians have long known that immune cells migrate to the site of an infection, which individuals experience as inflammation - swelling, redness and pain. Now, Northwestern University and University of Washington researchers have uncovered new evidence that this gathering is not just a consequence of immune activation.
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Image: A hand with a glove is holing a petri dish with bacterial cultures in it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lyoshanazarenko

Genetics: one quarter of bacteria can spread antibiotic resistance to peers

07.02.2020

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that at least 25 percent of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria found in clinical settings are capable of spreading their resistance directly to other bacteria.
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Image: Computer-generated image of a physician holding pathogens and related data between his hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sdecoret

Digitalization joins the fight against multi-resistant pathogens

05.02.2020

Developing fundamental new approaches against multi-resistant pathogens is the aim of the new Bavarian research network called New Strategies Against Multi-Resistant Pathogens by Means of Digital Networking - bayresq.net. A scientist from FAU is also conducting research in an interdisciplinary sub-project in the network.
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Image: color scale for the new bandage; Copyright: ACS Central Science 2020, DOI: 10.1021/acscentsci.9b01104

Wound care: color-changing bandages for bacterial infections

30.01.2020

According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes.
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Image: medications in a heap; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/CandyBoxImages

Sticky antibiotics stay in the gut

23.01.2020

Researchers have found how an antibiotic used to treat a debilitating gut infection stays put inside the body giving it time to effectively treat the problem, a discovery that will pave the way for the development of more effective antibiotic treatments to fight superbugs.
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Image: A smartphone is held above a petri dish with test strips; Copyright: University of Bath

Smartphone cameras can speed up urinary tract infection diagnosis

13.01.2020

Biological Engineers at the University of Bath have developed a test that could help medics quickly diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs), using a normal smartphone camera.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprotheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprotheses. Endoprotheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprotheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: patient with pain in fingers; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Milkos

APRICOT-project: implant "help(s) patients heal themselves"

01.01.2020

Today, people tend to live longer, while an increasing number of patients suffer from osteoarthritis. Even younger generations are now at a higher risk of getting osteoarthritis due to the frequent use of mobile devices. The EU research project APRICOT aims to develop a novel type of implant for the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hands – helping patients heal themselves.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprotheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: A greenly lit laboratory device; Copyright: Sven Döring

Photonics: "We want a rapid and easy method to identify pathogens and antibiotic resistance"

01.08.2019

The medical devices value chain has gaps between academic research and industrial practice that slow down innovation processes. This also applies to time-sensitive and urgently needed products such as rapid diagnostic tests to identify resistant pathogens. At the InfectoGnostics Research Campus in Jena, partners from research and medicine team up to close these gaps.
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Image: A man is holding a hand full of pill blisters with antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net/alexkalina

Combating antibiotic resistance: One step ahead through technology

01.08.2019

Antibiotic resistance is on the rise in all parts of the world, complicating medical treatment of serious bacterial infections in patients. The World Health Organization estimates that approximately 33,000 people die each year from antibiotic-resistant bacteria in Europe alone. Bacteria that are resistant to multiple or even all known antibiotics pose an ever-increasing threat.
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Image: Preview picture to the video

Company anniversary at MEDICA – Interview with the Dr. Schumacher GmbH

15.11.2018

The Dr. Schumacher GmbH was able to celebrate its 40th anniversary at MEDICA 2018. We used this opportunity for a short talk with the managing directors about the company's history, MEDICA and how hygiene in hospitals and physicians' offices can be ensured.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22.06.2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: two men in the laboratory next to the Organ Care System with a pig's lung inside; Copyright: Kaiser/MHH

Organ Care System: treatment under extreme conditions

08.05.2018

Multidrug-resistant organisms that are treated with a dosage that exceeds the regular dose a hundred times and at temperatures of over 40 degrees Celsius – the human organism is unable to handle it. Yet if the diseased organ is treated outside of the body, extreme conditions are an option. For the first time, physicians have succeeded in treating a severe case of pneumonia by using the OCS.
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