Current interviews -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: UV Visual Lift; Copyright: by UVentions

Hygiene: Smart protection against pathogens like the coronavirus

23.03.2020

Germs such as bacteria, viruses or pathogenic fungi can spread from one person to another through direct contact when we shake hands or touch objects. People touch door handles and push elevator buttons in public places and constantly move in and out of spaces. Regular manual high-level disinfection is practically impossible. UVentions GmbH has found an intelligent solution for this problem.
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Image: Face masks to protect humans from viruses, like corona; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Mouse family

Recyclable face masks to better protect against corona

20.03.2020

Wearing a face mask is a common sight in Korea during the COVID-19 outbreak. Due to the overwhelming demand, last week the government started to ration two masks per person per week, as a drastic measure to address the supply fiasco. The face masks most commonly used are disposable ones, originally made for filtering out up to 94 or 95 percent of fine dust, referred to as N94 or N95 masks.
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Image: Young woman uses app for Coronavirus tracking; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Antonio Guillem

Telemedicine: Coronavirus mobile app for contact tracing

19.03.2020

A team of medical research and bioethics experts at Oxford University are supporting European governments to explore the feasibility of rapidly and widely deploying a coronavirus mobile app for instant contact tracing.
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Image: New genetic method to accurately synthesize DNA; Copyright: panthermedia.net/nikesidoroff

Genetics: New low-cost method to reduce DNA errors

18.03.2020

DNA only persists through replication - naturally or synthetically. While humans need the genetic material to be reproduced in order to replace old or damaged cells, the ability to replicate DNA in a laboratory setting can provide researchers insights into the mechanisms of disease or the platform to develop treatments.
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 Image: Laboratory analysis of DNA; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sergunt

Genetic screening: New CRISPR technology to target RNA viruses

17.03.2020

New genetic screening platform using CRISPR technology for targeting thousands of genes in a massively-parallel fashion; accurate and fast method of finding best guides to detect, target, and knockdown specific RNA targets.
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Image: Medical diagnostics on coronavirus; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Vasyl Faievvch

Diagnostic tool: Rapid response coronavirus test

16.03.2020

Hackensack Meridian Health, New Jersey's largest and most comprehensive health network, is pleased to announce that the Center for Discovery and Innovation (CDI) has created a test to dramatically reduce the time it takes for diagnosing COVID-19. This is a major advance that will benefit patients, create a more effective triage system in hospitals and better control the spread of disease.
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Image: Nanopore sequencer for DNA analysis; Copyright: Courtesy of Fraunhofer IGBI

DNA: sequencing technique shortens diagnosis of sepsis

05.03.2020

A report in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new technique that uses real-time next-generation sequencing (NGS) to analyze tiny amounts of microbial cell-free DNA in the plasma of patients with sepsis, offering the possibility of accurate diagnosis of sepsis-causing agents within a few hours of drawing blood.
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Image: simulated bacterium propelling itself along using flagella pointing forwards and behind; Copyright: Sarah Mohammadinejed, University of Göttingen

Immunology: swimming bacteria

02.03.2020

The magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus swims with the help of two bundles of flagella, which are thread-like structures. The bacterial cells also possess a sort of intracellular "compass needle", meaning that their movements can be controlled using a magnetic field.
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Image: Microglia express tight junction molecule; Copyright: Hiroaki Wake

Immune cells damage the integrity of the blood-brain barrier

02.03.2020

The blood-brain barrier is a layer of cells that covers the blood vessels in the brain and regulates the entry of molecules from the blood into the brain. Increases in blood-brain barrier "permeability," or the extent to which molecules leak through, are observed in several neurological and psychiatric disorders.
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Image: immune cells counting each other; Copyright: Northwestern University

Immunology: cells consult each other to make decisions

14.02.2020

Scientists and physicians have long known that immune cells migrate to the site of an infection, which individuals experience as inflammation - swelling, redness and pain. Now, Northwestern University and University of Washington researchers have uncovered new evidence that this gathering is not just a consequence of immune activation.
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Image: mini-gut organoid generated in the lab; Copyright: UC San Diego Health Sciences

Gut-in-a-dish model to define gut leaks

11.02.2020

Leaky gut is most often experienced by older people, patients with cancers or other chronic ailments, and people with especially stressful lifestyles. Stressors break down the zipper-like junctions between the cells that form the gut lining. Microbes and molecules that subsequently leak out through these cell gaps can trigger an immune response, contributing to a variety of diseases.
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Image: A half-transparent red piece of tissue in a glass filled with a yellow fluid; Copyright: United Therapeutics

rhCollagen: genetically engineered building block for regenerative medicine

03.02.2020

Collagen is the stuff that holds our bodies together and that houses our cells. In regenerative medicine, it is also the stuff that can be applied to wounds to support healing. However, collagen from animal or human sources has some drawbacks for today’s medicine. This is where rhCollagen from the Israeli company CollPlant comes into play.
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Image: medications in a heap; Copyright: Panthermedia.net/CandyBoxImages

Sticky antibiotics stay in the gut

23.01.2020

Researchers have found how an antibiotic used to treat a debilitating gut infection stays put inside the body giving it time to effectively treat the problem, a discovery that will pave the way for the development of more effective antibiotic treatments to fight superbugs.
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Image: Nikolas Herold a researcher at Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset; Copyright: Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset

Inexpensive drug may alleviate treatment-resistance in leukemia

20.01.2020

A common and inexpensive drug may be used to counteract treatment resistance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), one of the most common forms of blood cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in mice and human blood cells performed at Karolinska Institutet and SciLifeLab and published in the medical journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.
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Image: graphic showing that cancer cells will be destroyed while healthy cells are spared with targeted pulsed ultrasound; Copyright: David Mittelstein

Ultrasound selectively damages cancer cells when tuned to correct frequencies

08.01.2020

Doctors have used focused ultrasound to destroy tumors without invasive surgery for some time. However, the therapeutic ultrasound used in clinics today indiscriminately damages cancer and healthy cells alike.
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Image: Athlete with knee pain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Itd

Endoprotheses: between possibility and reality

01.01.2020

When natural joints lose their ability to function, they can be completely or partially replaced by artificial joints, also called endoprotheses. Endoprotheses must be of a certain quality, as they should remain in the body as long as possible. In addition to some risks, endoprotheses can also contribute to a mobile and carefree life for young and old.
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Image: cemented artificial hip endoprostheses; Copyright: panthermedia.net/coddie

Endoprotheses: regaining independence and mobility

01.01.2020

Joints can suddenly or gradually deteriorate and lose their natural strength, whether it’s due to accidents, diseases or simple wear and tear. In some of these cases, implants of artificial joints – endoprostheses - can help. As a joint replacement, they are designed to stay in the body for as long as needed and as such improve the patient’s quality of life and mobility.
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Image: doctor consoles patients before surgery; Copyright: panthermedia.net/luckybusiness

Endoprosthetic surgery: modern and traditional approaches

01.01.2020

Surgery is required if you need an artificial joint. Patients and doctors must select the type of surgery that’s best suited and choose between robot-assisted, traditional or minimally invasive surgical approaches. Post-operative risks should be kept to a minimum, while benefits should outweigh any possible complications.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04.11.2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08.10.2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01.08.2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: Sports shoes of an athlete; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Daxiao_Productions

Sports medicine - performance values in best health

01.07.2019

Those who integrate physical activities into their own lifestyle live healthier and more balanced. But where are the physical limits? Can health status measurements also be carried out on the road? Discover more about how sports medical examinations contribute to maintain performance and minimize health risks in our Topic of the Month.
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Image: Marathon runner; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adamgregor

Sports medicine – keep moving to stay healthy

01.07.2019

Physical activity plays a big role in today's society. Whether you are an amateur or professional athlete – incorporating exercise into your life positively impacts your mental and physical health. Ideally, sport should be fun, pressure-free and not overburden you. But can you measure individual performance and align it with sports?
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Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01.03.2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
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