Background Reports 2020 -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: 3D representation of lymph nodes and their blood vessels; Copyright: Paul Schütz

Paul Schütz

How lymph nodes are supplied with blood

07/12/2022

3D images have been obtained that show the vascular system of the nodes with previously unattained resolution.
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Bild: An Endoscope in an automated endoscope cleaner; Copyright: Aston University

Aston University

Fighting antimicrobial resistance with world-first automated endoscope cleaner

06/12/2022

Aston University and Partnership Medical (PML) have completed a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP), resulting in the development of a revolutionary automated system for the high-level cleaning of endoscopes.
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Bild: A man with brown hair, Dr. Dr. René Hägerling, poses for the camera; Copyright: BIH/David Ausserhofer

BIH/David Ausserhofer

ERC Starting Grant: Why do blood and lymphatic vessels grow unchecked?

02/12/2022

Anomalies in the formation of blood and lymphatic vessels are, thankfully, rare. Those who do have them face a lifetime of complications that can range from the mild to the life-threatening. To date, little is known about the causes, which means the diagnostic and treatment options are very limited. René Hägerling of the BIH Center for Regenerative Therapies has made it his mission to remedy this.
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Image: Looking at a neuropathological large slice preparation (from left): Prof. Dr. Albert Becker, Dr. Juri-Alexander Witt and Annika Reimers in the Institute; Copyright: Barbara Frommann/University

Barbara Frommann/University of Bonn

Unexpected cognitive deteriorations in epilepsy

29/11/2022

In severe epilepsies, surgical intervention is often the only remedy - usually with great success. While neuropsychological performance can recover in the long term after successful surgery, on rare occasions, unexpected declines in cognitive performance occur. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now been able to show which patients are at particularly high risk for this.
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Image: Medical team, three women, discussing results of X-ray or MRI scan of patient's brain in clinic medical office; Copyright: FoToArtist_1

FoToArtist_1

Warmer brain-irrigation fluid in surgery more efficacious

25/11/2022

A simple method can halve the number of repeat operations to remedy bleeding under the cranium, a study at the University of Gothenburg shows. The method is based on replacing irrigation fluid at room temperature with fluid at body temperature.
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Image: Hands holding a tablet with MRI scans of the brain; Copyright: Nikita_Karchevskyi

Nikita_Karchevskyi

Tumors: forecasting the risks of brain surgery

22/11/2022

Can surgeons quantify the risk of aphasia when removing a brain tumor? To find out, researchers at Klinikum rechts der Isar of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are analyzing the brain as a network. In a current study with 60 patients, they already achieved an accuracy rate with three quarters of their predictions.
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Image: A white magnetic resonance imaging scanning device in the hospital; Copyright: Nikita_Karchevskyi

Nikita_Karchevskyi

Quantum technology for cancer imaging

21/11/2022

Tracing the metabolism of tumor cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been feasible in routine clinical settings hitherto. Now, an interdisciplinary research team including the Technical University of Munich (TUM) is working to advance the development of a quantum-based hyperpolarizer so that it can be deployed in clinical applications.
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Image: Doctor sits in an armchair at his desk, looks at the screen and examines the results of computed tomography; Copyright: Iakobchuk

Iakobchuk

MEDICA 2022: Simplifying analysis and visualization of medical image data

15/11/2022

A team of researchers from Kaiserslautern and Leipzig is working on a system that automatically analyses and visualises medical data, including their uncertainties.
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Image: A black haired woman and a bald man analyze an x-ray of a lung; Copyright: University of the West of Scotland

University of the West of Scotland

Artificial intelligence could help ease hospital pressures

10/11/2022

Pioneering artificial intelligence (AI) which automatically diagnoses lung diseases – such as tuberculosis and pneumonia – could ease winter pressures on hospitals, University of the West of Scotland researchers believe.
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Image: A mammologist makes breast ultrasound scan in the clinic; Copyright: NomadSoul1

NomadSoul1

Possible biological explanation for increased cancer risk in dense breasts

04/11/2022

The risk of developing breast cancer is higher in what are known as dense breasts, which appear white in mammograms, than in nondense breasts, which appear grey. Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have now shown that there are major biological differences dense breasts and nondense breasts.
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Image: The ToSyMa research team, consisting of three men and two women, poses in front of a white wall. All wear fine clothes; Copyright: WWU - E. Wibberg

WWU - E. Wibberg

Breast cancer: ToSyMa study shows superior diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis

02/11/2022

Tomosynthesis – the method being extensively tested for early breast cancer detection by ToSyMa, the world's largest randomized controlled trial - appears to be convincing across the entire line.
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Image: Ultrasound examination of 10 month old twin boys; Copyright: mvaligursky

mvaligursky

Stillbirth prevention: Start of project under leadership of University Hospital Tübingen

20/10/2022

Stillbirth rates are high all over the world. Every 16 seconds, a baby is stillborn after the 28th week of pregnancy. Wellcome Leap’s In Utero program aims to reduce this number by half with the help of advanced imaging methods.
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Image: Three men pose; From left to right: Dr. Sergey Korchak, Dr. Stefan Glöggler, and Dr. Henning Schroeder; Copyright: Anna Hübner / Max-Planck-Institut

Anna Hübner / Max-Planck-Institut

Funding for a new method in cancer diagnostics

13/10/2022

An efficient contrast agent method for MRI imaging developed by Max Planck researcher Stefan Gloeggler raises hopes of being able to distinguish tumors from healthy tissue on the basis of their metabolic activity.
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Image: Close up of periosteum in a bone; Copyright: HUG

HUG

Bone fragility: European green light for marketing precision diagnostics

27/09/2022

A new device for diagnosing bone fragility invented by the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) and the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has been approved for marketing in the European Economic Area and Switzerland.
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Image: A woman and two men discuss MRI images in a laboratory with computers; Copyright: Andreas Heddergott / TUM

Andreas Heddergott / TUM

Improved monitoring of silicone implants

23/09/2022

An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new algorithm that improves the quality of MR images by depicting water, fat, and silicone simultaneously in a reliable and fully automated way.
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Bild: Group photograph of Nimble Diagnostics representatives, 13 male and female persons; Copyright: Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

Start-up to monitor stents using microwave technology

22/09/2022

Nimble Diagnostics is a spin-off that develops microwave-based technology to monitor stents implanted in patients with cardiovascular, vascular, renal or lung disease.
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Image: A cardiologist looks after a study participant during an MRI scan; Copyright: Uwe Dettmar

Uwe Dettmar

Long COVID: persistent heart inflammation might explain heart symptoms

15/09/2022

The research team led by Dr Valentina Puntmann and Professor Eike Nagel from University Hospital Frankfurt and Goethe University Frankfurt followed up around 350 study participants without previously known heart problems who had recovered from a SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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Image: A young man has two electrodes placed under his ear and is receiving electrical nerve stimulation, Copyright: senencov

senencov

Stimulation of vagus nerve strengthens communication between stomach and brain

14/09/2022

A research team led by Prof. Dr. Nils Kroemer of the University Hospitals of Tübingen and Bonn has shown for the first time that non-invasive stimulation of the vagus nerve at the ear can strengthen the communication between stomach and brain within minutes.
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Image: A young couple holds hands while walking through the forest; Copyright: Olena Rudo

Olena Rudo

MRI shows how nature nurtures the brain

12/09/2022

After a 60-minute walk in nature, activity in brain regions involved in stress processing decreases. This is the finding of a recent study by the Lise Meitner Group for Environmental Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, published in Molecular Psychiatry.
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Image: Man in a lab is holding a long instrument in his hand – Dr. Danila Barskiy; Copyright: Danila Barskiy

Danila Barskiy

Portable spectroscopy devices could soon become real

09/09/2022

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is an analytical tool with a wide range of applications, including the magnetic resonance imaging that is used for diagnostic purposes in medicine. However, NMR often requires powerful magnetic fields to be generated, which limits the scope of its use.
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Image: Digital twin of the lungs; Copyright: Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

Ebenbuild/Jakob Richter

ARDS: Testing Consequences without Consequence

14/11/2019

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening illness in which the lungs are severely damaged. The condition always requires intensive medical care through mechanical ventilation. But not all lungs are the same. To ensure a personalized treatment that is adapted to the individual patient’s lung volume and condition, Ebenbuild relies on digital twins.
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Image: Two screens with picture of the circulatory system in a catheter laboratory; Copyright: panthermedia.net/sudok1

MEDICA TECH FORUM: light-based imaging technique OCT

04/11/2019

Since its inception, MEDICA TECH FORUM has focused on the implementation of innovations and new technologies into clinical practice. 2019 marks the tenth year of the Forum. In honor of its anniversary, we will brighten things up a bit, as one of the focal points will highlight how optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses light to produce images.
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Image: A physician is standing in front of a floating image of the brain and is touching one point; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Igor Vetushko

Medicine 5.0: machine learning algorithms in healthcare

04/11/2019

Artificial intelligence holds the promise of salvation when it comes to medicine: it is meant to unburden medical professionals, save time and money and perform tasks reliably and tirelessly. But before AI algorithms are allowed to diagnose diseases, many technical and ethical questions still need answers.
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Image: Wojcech Radomski; Copyright: StethoMe

Telemedicine: easy breathing with AI for respiratory tract

01/10/2019

Pneumonia, COPD or cystic fibrosis – people with such lung diseases have to consult their doctor regularly. Little children have to undergo certain measurements by the doctor, too. In order to save people`s need to visit a doctor, telemedicine offers many ways to do examinations at home.
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Image: Robot looks at huge amount of CT images of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

AI in imaging: how machines manage our Big Data

02/09/2019

In modern medicine, especially in the field of imaging, huge amounts of data are produced – so much that radiologists can hardly keep up with diagnosing the images. Artificial Intelligence could be the solution to this problem. But how exactly can it help in this task? How can man and machine work together? And what else will be possible in the future with the support of intelligent systems?
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Image: CT image of the lungs with AI-supported automatic highlighting, quantification and measurement of anatomy and deviations; Copyright: Klinikum Nürnberg

AI in radiology: reliable partner for diagnosing CT images

02/09/2019

More patients, more examinations, more CT images – in radiology there is too much work for too few physicians. CT scans are evaluated in the shortest possible time, which leads to anomalies being overlooked. Artificial intelligence, on the other hand, works with constant speed and performance, which is why radiological routine increasingly relies on its support.
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Image: Robot points with his finger at CT images of the brain, in the background a CT device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/phonlamai

Man vs. machine – the benefits of AI in imaging

02/09/2019

Radiology is a field that produces large volumes of data, which can no longer be managed without the help of intelligent systems. This is especially true when it comes to the interpretation of medical images. While this takes physicians years of training and experience, several hours of work and the highest level of concentration, AI only requires a few seconds to accomplish the same task.
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Image: DLIR image of the aorta; Copyright: GE Healthcare

Deep Learning Image Reconstruction – what AI looks like in clinical routine

02/09/2019

Artificial intelligence is no longer a dream of the future in medicine. Many studies and initial application examples show that it sometimes achieves better results than human physicians. At Jena University Hospital, the work with AI is already lived practice. It is the first institution in the world to use algorithms in radiological routine to reconstruct CT images.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22/07/2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Image: Team Capsix with KUKA robot arm and body model; Copyright: Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Capsix Robotics, Lyon

Healthy Living thanks to robotics – KUKA Innovation Award 2019

24/06/2019

Improving technology transfer from research to industry and driving robotics development - that's the idea behind the KUKA Innovation Award. This year’s topic is "Healthy Living". Applicants from around the world were tasked with creating a robot application for healthcare settings. Now, the finalists, who will showcase their innovations at the MEDICA 2019 trade fair have been selected.
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Image: Female surgeon in scrubs is standing in an MRI control room and looks at screens; Copyright: Medtronic

Medtronic

VISUALASE: epilepsy surgery with the laser catheter

11/06/2019

Epilepsy patients are currently treated with either medication or surgical options. The aim is to remove the distinct regions of the brain that cause epileptic seizures. Laser ablation for epilepsy is a new, catheter-based surgical procedure that is now also available in Europe, preventing patients from having to undergo open brain surgery.
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Image: Screenshot of the VR app: a small penguin sitting on the treatment table of the MRI device; Copyright: Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Entertainment Computing Group, Uni DUE & LAVAlabs Moving Images

Gamification: how penguins help children overcome their MRI fear

23/04/2019

It's noisy, tight and scary - that's how children feel about a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. Because they are scared, they are often too fidgety and anxious during the procedure, causing the images to blur or the scan to be stopped. Researchers have now developed a VR app called Pingunauten Trainer that’s designed to gently prepare the little patients for MRI scans.
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Image: Man on a treatment table under a radiation therapy device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

panthermedia.net/adriaticphoto

Cardiac arrhythmia: treatment in the linear accelerator

08/04/2019

Cardiac arrhythmia is a group of conditions where nerve cells trigger uncontrolled contractions of the heart muscle. They are treated with either medicine or catheter ablation of the tissue. In an interdisciplinary collaboration, cardiologists and radiotherapists took a different approach and used high-precision radiation therapy to treat a patient for whom the other options proved unfeasible.
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Image: Patient during an fMRI examination; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Chris De Silver

Functional imaging: what makes the brain tick?

01/04/2019

Our brain is the command center of our body. This is where all information and impressions are collected and converted into responses and movements. Modern imaging techniques offer physicians and researchers unique insights into the actions of the human central nervous system. The functional imaging technique allows them to watch our brain in action.
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Image: CT scan open; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Functional imaging: a look at the command center

01/04/2019

All information from our body and the environment converges in our brain and is transformed into reactions in milliseconds. It is essential for medicine and research to know what our switching centre looks like. Functional methods are used to observe it more closely during work.
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Image: close-up of a woman lying in an MRI device; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Craig Robinson

Brain mapping: preoperative planning with functional MRI

01/04/2019

A surgery already begins before the patient is lying on the operating table – namely with the planning. For example, if brain surgery is imminent, the brain must first be mapped. This makes the activity level of certain brain areas visible. Functional magnetic resonance imaging makes this possible.
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Image: Man during CT examination; Copyright: panthermedia.nt/Romaset

Stroke: 4D brain perfusion accelerates treatment

01/04/2019

In an ischaemic stroke, rapid treatment is essential. In this moment good imaging data is particularly important to enable doctors to make the best possible decision for therapy. Modern CT scanners are increasingly being used to assess stroke patients because they can show the blood flow to the brain over time.
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Image: Lung monitoring of a patient with PulmoVista 500 by Draeger; Copyright: Drägerwerk AG & Co. KGaA

Restoring Pulmonary Function

01/03/2019

People suffering from lung disease temporarily need ventilator support because they are unable to breathe naturally. Mechanical ventilation is designed to ensure the survival of these patients. The goal is to adapt the ventilator settings and tailor them the patient's specific needs and prevent lung tissue damage.
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