Magazine overview -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: Close-up: The complex architecture of the neuroepithelial organoids with cell membranes; Copyright: Keisuke Ishihara

Keisuke Ishihara

Measuring organ development

28/11/2022

Researchers from Dresden and Vienna reveal link between connectivity of three-dimensional structures in tissues and the emergence of their architecture to help scientists engineer self-organising tissues that mimic human organs.
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Image: Close-up of a male chest-shoulder area with a tattoo-like drawing on the skin that is supposed to represent a gene cluster; Copyright: Polygraph Design

Polygraph Design

How genes and small molecules influence personal disease risk

25/11/2022

In an international collaboration with partners from Cambridge (UK), scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health at the Charité (BIH) have now discovered more than 300 regions in the genome that contribute to this individual chemical fingerprint. They have now published their results in Nature Medicine.
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Image: A man in a blue shirt sits at a desk and smiles at the camera; Copyright: University of Oslo

University of Oslo

Resistances: these bacteria hide and then take charge

23/11/2022

A doctor discovers bacteria in a sample that is causing a case of pneumonia and prescribes antibiotics. But at the same time, there is another, nastier variant of bacteria lurking in the patient’s body that is very glad to have got rid of its competitor.
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Image: A square large gray box in the lab. Microfluidic readout unit for subsequent clinical multiplex analysis; Copyright: Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen

Multiplex analysis with para-magnetic microparticles

18/11/2022

A team from the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen has developed a new readout unit for para-magnetic particles in a microfluidic system.
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Image: Preview picture of video

Laboratory: how smart gadgets support everyday work

17/11/2022

At MEDICA 2022, you can see why smart assistants are needed in the laboratory and which gadgets have made it into everyday laboratory work, thus reducing the workload of the specialists there and increasing efficiency.
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Image: A small square apparatus, an electrochemical sensing platform for studying in vitro vascular systems. The channels and reservoirs were visualized using blue ink.; Copyright: Tohoku University

Tohoku University

Sensing platform for studying in vitro vascular systems

11/11/2022

The costliness of drug development and the limitations of studying physiological processes in the lab are two separate scientific issues that may share the same solution.
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Image: Mobile laboratory unit with integrated lifting device for a standard truck chassis; Copyright: Fraunhofer IBMT/Markus Michel

Fraunhofer IBMT/Markus Michel

MEDICA 2022: Biological laboratory to go

10/11/2022

Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT have developed the “BioSensoLab“, a mobile biological laboratory with which they can demonstrate new developments to customers and test them together – on site at their companies.
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Image: Close-up of a hand in a blue laboratory glove putting a sample of blood under a microscope; Copyright: prostooleh

prostooleh

New initiative to INDICATE cancer risks

28/10/2022

INDICATE, an international collaborative initiative to unravel the role of the Human Leukocyte Antigen type as risk modifier in individuals with a genetic cancer predisposition.
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Image: Close-up of a hand in a blue laboratory glove using a pipette to fill samples into a row of micro test tubes; Copyright: sommthink/Shutterstock

sommthink/Shutterstock

Head and neck cancer: Markers to facilitate better treatment in the future

27/10/2022

Malignant tumours in the head and neck region are very heterogeneous and therefore difficult to treat. A joint study by MedUni Vienna and the Christian Doppler Laboratory for Applied Metabolomics focused on the development and identification of specific markers to improve risk assessment for patients.
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Image: A scientist fills plasma-treated liquids into a test tube with a pipette; Copyright: Toni Santiso / Rectimepro

Toni Santiso / Rectimepro

Boosting new gas plasma-based treatments for cancer

17/10/2022

Exploring the possibilities of atmospheric-pressure plasmas to develop and consolidate new medical therapies is the main objective of the PlasTHER network, an initiative funded by the European Union under the COST Actions.
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Image: An x-ray of the lungs showing a male hand pointing to a specific spot with a pen; Copyright: TNMDesign/Shutterstock

TNMDesign/Shutterstock

Small cell lung cancer: approach to personalised treatment

14/10/2022

A study led by MedUni Vienna has shown for the first time that different SCLC subtypes have specific molecular characteristics, which is why those affected respond in different ways to cancer treatment.
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Image: A shell made of polymers houses a photoresponsive molecule, which is irradiated with UV light and creates an opening; Copyright: MPI-P

MPI-P

How light can be used to control processes in synthetic cells

12/10/2022

Synthetic – i. e. artificially produced - cells can imitate certain functions of biological cells. These synthetic cells could open up new medical possibilities in the future.
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Image: The research team, consists of three men, poses in front of an institute building; Copyright: LIT

LIT

Synthetic biosensors reprogram Treg cells to tame autoimmunity and chronic inflammation

10/10/2022

Scientists from the Division of Immunology at the Leibniz Institute for Immunotherapy (LIT) have now developed new types of synthetic biosensors, so-called artificial immune receptors (AIRs), which can be used to reprogram Treg cells into intelligent "smart" Tregs.
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Image: RT-PCR diagnostic test for COVID-19 virus disease, laboratory technician wearing blue protective gloves holding test tube with swab stick; Copyright: drecun

drecun

Saliva test could provide early warning for severe Covid cases

05/10/2022

Saliva samples could soon be key to predicting the severity of someone's case of Covid-19, allowing hospitals to triage patients effectively, according to new research from the University of Surrey.
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Image: A woman in a white coat sits in the laboratory and smiles at the camera; Copyright: Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

'Placenta-on-a-chip' mimics malaria-infected nutrient exchange between mother-fetus

30/09/2022

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s College of Engineering and Computer Science and Schmidt College of Medicine have developed a placenta-on-a-chip model that mimics the nutrient exchange between the fetus and mother under the influence of placental malaria.
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Image: Close up of periosteum in a bone; Copyright: HUG

HUG

Bone fragility: European green light for marketing precision diagnostics

27/09/2022

A new device for diagnosing bone fragility invented by the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) and the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has been approved for marketing in the European Economic Area and Switzerland.
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Image: Microbiologist during an inspection of a petri dish; Copyright: microgen

microgen

Muscle models mimic diabetes, inform personalized medicine

21/09/2022

Abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) levels can result in Type 2 diabetes when things go awry with the body's skeletal muscle, which plays a key role in regulating glucose.
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Image: Long structure of DNA double helix shown in dept; Copyright: ktsimage

ktsimage

Ten new risk genes for Crohn's disease

20/09/2022

The results of the international study involving the Cluster of Excellence PMI also point to a previously unknown process in the development of this chronic inflammatory bowel disease.
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Image: A photo in a dark room with weak green light shows a novel biohybrid sensor technology; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA

Fraunhofer IPA

Biointelligent sensor for measuring viral activity

16/09/2022

Fraunhofer IPA is the overall coordinator of the European biointelligence project BioProS, which is funded with over 6 million euros as part of the HORIZON Europe programme. In this project, a biointelligent sensor for measuring viral activity for the production of therapeutics is being developed.
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Image: Electron microscopic image of Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Copyright: 4.0/Finci, I. et al.

4.0/Finci, I. et al.

Personalised antibiotic treatment strategies for tuberculosis patients

16/09/2022

In an international study presented in the journal Lancet Microbe, DZIF researchers have now succeeded in identifying patient-specific resistance patterns using a bacterial genome analysis technique.
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Image: Microscope in biotechnology laboratory with laboratory samples in the background; Copyright: ckstockphoto

ckstockphoto

Machine learning to unlock genomic code in clinical cancer samples

13/09/2022

A new paper from University of Helsinki, published in Nature Communications, suggests a method for accurately analysing genomics data in cancer archival biopsies.
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Image: diagnostic test on a table; Copyright: beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

beta web GmbH/Melanie Prüser

Single-use tests: sensitivity and easy use combined for diagnostics

12/12/2019

Diagnostic testing usually takes some time and a sterile environment to get the results. To cut down on the costs and effort spend on these tasks there are different diagnostic tests. One of them are single-use tests offered by SensDx S.A. The technology behind them not only makes the process faster and easier, but provides the opportunity to expand into home use in the future as well.
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Image: Blood sample labelled

panthermedia.net/olanstock

Cardiac diagnostics – prompt and personalized

08/11/2019

If physicians suspect an acute myocardial infarction, they first order an ECG. This test is very established and allows cardiologists to quickly diagnose acute heart attacks – though the test does not detect less common heart attack symptoms. So far, those patients had to wait up to twelve hours before a heart attack could be accurately diagnosed or ruled out. But things are about the change.
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Image: Flags are blowing in the wind to the backdrop of a dark evening sky; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

Medicine at the pulse of time: Innovations and trends at MEDICA 2019

04/11/2019

Soon, the world's largest trade fair for medical technology will open its doors again: More than 5.000 exhibitors will present their newest products and ideas at MEDICA from 18 to 21 November. You will not only meet well-known companies here, but also lots of young start-ups. Or, you can visit the MEDICA forums and conferences to experience a rich program of lectures and discussions.
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Image: A little toy figure of a man in a suit is standing on a print-out of DNA sequencing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/filmfoto

MEDICA LABMED FORUM: full speed ahead for careers in laboratory medicine

04/11/2019

Laboratories are medicine’s secret weapon because they handle the lion’s share of diagnostics often without patients even realizing it. That’s why the continuing workforce shortage in both laboratory medicine and companies is especially troubling. The MEDICA LABMED FORUM 2019 plans to address and counteract this development.
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Image: Volker Bruns; Copyright: Fraunhofer ISS

Fraunhofer ISS

AI software: "iSTIX opens your world to the possibilities of digital pathology"

08/10/2019

The healthcare market offers a multitude of microscopes that make cells visible to the human eye. The same applies to AI-based software for image analysis. After taking the microscopic images, scientist are faced with large volumes of scans with usually low resolution. Yet when all aspects merge together, they open up a the world of digital pathology.
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Image: MEDICA START-UP PARK; Copyright: Messe Düsseldorf/ctillmann

MEDICA START-UP PARK: "For those, who want to experience the startup-spirit"

01/10/2019

When the halls of MEDICA are open to the world to showcase medical innovations, one joint exhibition booth is guaranteed to attract special attention - the MEDICA START-UP PARK. The startups that present their advances in this setting are interesting to visitors and investors, yet long-time exhibitors and big businesses can also benefit from building relationships with these young companies.
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Image: Man with mouthguard and laboratory glasses holding Petri dish up; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kasto

panthermedia.net/kasto

Cardiac Tissue Engineering: a heart out of the Petri dish

23/09/2019

For patients waiting for donor organs, every day can mean the difference between life and death. Making things even more complicated is the fact that not every organ is a compatible match with the patient. It would mean enormous progress if we could grow organs from the patient's own cells in the lab. That's why patients with heart disease place big hope in tissue engineering.
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Image: Participants of the German Medical Award 2018; Copyright: German Medical Award

German Medical Award

German Medical Award 2019 celebrates the future of (patient) care

22/08/2019

The German Medical Award will take place on November 18, 2019, as part of the MEDICA trade fair in Düsseldorf. The ceremony emphasizes the commitment to excellence in cutting-edge care for patients. Doctors, clinical centers and companies in the medical and healthcare industry can demonstrate their achievements in medicine and management in hopes of receiving the coveted award.
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Image: Laboratory situation - Prof. Popp shows a young man a small object in his hand; Copyright: Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Leibniz-IPHT/Sven Döring

Tumor excision: triple imaging for unique diagnostics

08/08/2019

After their tumor has been removed, some patients have to return to the hospital to undergo surgery again. That's because the tumor was not precisely identified and was subsequently not completely removed. That's both an ethical and financial dilemma. A new surgery-adjacent procedure is designed to rapidly and accurately detect tumors.
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Image: Two petri dishes with different kinds of agar plates on which bacterial cultures are growing; Copyright: panthermedia.net/photographee.eu

Antibiotic resistance: technical tricks against pathogens

01/08/2019

An untreatable infection is a nightmare for physicians and potentially life-threatening to the patient. Unfortunately, more and more pathogens emerge that are resistant to drugs, especially antibiotics. We need to use our drugs smartly and come up with technical solutions as well to prevent our weapons from blunting in the future.
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Image: A lab technician is using a pipette to fill a solution into a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Last-resort antibiotics: "We can identify carbapenemases within half an hour"

01/08/2019

Antibiotic resistance is modern medicine's greatest challenge. Some bacteria only respond to a handful of antibiotics, prompting hospitals to spend a lot of time finding an effective drug. That’s why it is critical for physicians to rapidly identify antibiotic resistance to avoid ineffective treatments.
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Image: Flags; Copyright: SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

SilverSky LifeSciences GmbH

Striking new paths in medicine - Diagnostics Partnering Conference 2019

08/07/2019

On November 18th, 2019, parallel to the first day of MEDICA, the world forum for medicine, the Diagnostics Partnering Conference (DxPx Conference) will take place in Düsseldorf, bringing together stakeholders in the diagnostics and research tool industry. The DxPx Conference focuses on discovering technologies, finding financing and investment opportunities and forming collaborative partnerships.
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Image: Cell cultivation in a Petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net / matej kastelic

Organ-on-a-chip – Organs in miniature format

01/02/2019

In vitro processes and animal tests are used to develop new medications and novel therapeutic approaches. However, animal testing raises important ethical concerns. Organ-on-a-chip models promise to be a feasible alternative. In a system the size of a smartphone, organs are connected using artificial circulation.
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Image: Graphic rendering of several cells in a petri dish; Copyright: panthermedia.net/dani3315

Organ-on-a-chip systems: limited validity?

01/02/2019

Organ-on-a-chip systems are technically a great enhancement of medical research because they facilitate testing of active ingredients on cell cultures in the chambers of a plastic chip. This replaces animal testing and improves patient safety. That being said, they are not a true-to-life replication of the human body and can only simulate a few functions and activities.
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Image: Man and woman in a laboratory presenting a multi-organ chip; Copyright: TissUse GmbH

Multi-Organ Chips – The Patients of Tomorrow?

01/02/2019

The liver, nervous tissue or the intestines: all are important human organs that have in the past been tested for their function and compatibility using animal or in vitro test methods. In recent years, TissUse GmbH, a spin-off of the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin), has launched multi-organ chip platforms. But that’s not all.
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