Magazine overview -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

Image: A hand-held smartphone is presented in a duplicated manner. The screens show the interface of the Smart in OAC app, Copyright: AFNET

AFNET

Abnormal heartbeat identified in 1 in 20 older adults with wearable and smartphone

30/11/2022

A study offered smartphone and wearable-based continuous arrhythmia screening to older adults without known atrial fibrillation. Atrial arrhythmia was detected in five percent of the participants.
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Image: A workflow diagram that shows how patient data is transmitted to the doctor via an app and a server, Copyright: Fraunhofer FOKUS

Fraunhofer FOKUS

MEDICA 2022: Everyday digital assistance

14/11/2022

Should I exercise? Is a bike ride overdoing it? These are some of the questions commonly asked by patients with heart problems, tumors or orthopedic problems. In the future, the “Quantified Health System” from the Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems FOKUS might be able to help individuals with questions like these.
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Image: A gray sensor wristband against a blue background with human anatomy holograms; Copyright: Fraunhofer IZM/ Technische Universität Berlin

Fraunhofer IZM/ Technische Universität Berlin

Sensor bracelet measures environmental forces, improves treatment of lung diseases

03/11/2022

Tiny particulates or noxious gases: From the day they are born, all people are exposed to a range of environmental forces. These forces constitute the exposome and affect the health and wellbeing of people around the world. A European research project has been set up to explore how the exposome affects the course of lung diseases.
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Image: picture collage from an image of dry-type bioelectrode and thin-film sensor sheet , Copyright: Advanced Materials Technologies

Advanced Materials Technologies

Measuring brain activity on the go

24/10/2022

Researchers from The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (SANKEN) at Osaka University develop a flexible, wearable and discreet device that can accurately record brain activity in everyday settings.
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Image: Two men posing, José Näf and Michel Schmid with the textile-based electrodes for long-term ECGs in their laboratory; Copyright: Marlies Thurnheer / Empa

Marlies Thurnheer / Empa

Textile electrodes for medtech applications

19/10/2022

Nahtlos, an Empa spin-off, has received 1 million Swiss francs in a first round of financing from a network of business angels from Switzerland and Liechtenstein and from the Startfeld Foundation. With this funding, Nahtlos aims to drive the market entry of its newly developed textile-based electrode for medical applications.
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Image: A closeup of a female hand operating a smartwatch; Copyright: Pexels.com

Pexels.com

Researcher cautions against relying too much on smartwatches

19/10/2022

More and more heart rate monitors, fitness trackers and smartwatches are coming onto the market. But can you trust what they tell you?
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Image: Two female hands on blue background. On the left with a yellow tracking bracelet and on the right with a smartphone in hand, Copyright: Irina Shatilova

Irina Shatilova

MS: Model predicts health conditions during stay-at-home periods

12/10/2022

Research led by Carnegie Mellon University has developed a model that can accurately predict how stay-at-home orders like those put in place during the COVID-19 pandemic affect the mental health of people with chronic neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis.
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Image: An elderly person is fitted with a modern hearing aid; Copyright: halfpoint

halfpoint

Novel sensor system with AI-driven biomarkers for patients with heart failure

07/10/2022

UNISONO aims to develop a novel system combining an ear-worn sensor with speech recognition.
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Image: Close up of a woman using a smart watch; Copyright: leungchopan

leungchopan

Wearable sensors styled into t-shirts and face masks

29/09/2022

Imperial researchers have embedded new low-cost sensors that monitor breathing, heart rate, and ammonia into t-shirts and face masks.
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Image: elderly woman with a tablet on her lap; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Ambient Assisted Living: sensors for seniors

02/12/2019

Our ageing society is confronted with fewer and fewer workers. One of the many consequences is a shortage of skilled nursing staff. Ambient Assisted Living should solve this problem. By equipping the living environment of elderly people or people in need of care with (technical) assistance systems, they are to be given more self-determination and security. The nursing staff also benefits.
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Image: elderly woman in a wheelchair showing a nurse something on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mark@rocketclips.com

Smart care: safety and support thanks to AAL

02/12/2019

Average life expectancy keeps increasing, while birth rates are declining – at least when it comes to most industrial nations. The coming decades will see a decreasing number of gainfully employed people versus more and more senior citizens and people in need of care. It's a trend that already pushes healthcare to the brink. That's why we desperately need new concepts. One of them is AAL.
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Image: white flat sensor module: the smart care plaster moio.care; Copyright: MOIO GmbH

Wearables: more freedom with the smart care patch

02/12/2019

Too many people in need of care and not enough health care professionals – we all know the problem. For years, research is underway to find digital solutions for AAL to support the growing number of older & sick adults. These new technologies aim to both alleviate caregiver burden and enhance everyday life of people in need of care with a minimum level of constraint whilst promoting independence.
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Image: two athletes at the startline for a race; Copyright: panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

panthermedia.net/vitalikradko

Sports Hub project changes sports medicine with big data and AI

22/10/2019

Professor Jarek Krajewski sat down for a MEDICA interview and delivered a detailed description of the Sports Hub project. It highlights how big data and AI transform the world of sports medicine. The project delivers new insights and provides a versatile database.
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Image: A biker is riding on rocky ground in a steppe; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

panthermedia.net/Daxiao Productions

Triathlete Sebastian Kienle: wearables and body awareness improve athletic performance

09/09/2019

A 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and a marathon 26.22-mile (42.20 km) run – that’s the Ironman Triathlon. Triathletes like Sebastian Kienle are constantly working to push beyond their limits. At the 7th MEDICA MEDICINE + SPORTS CONFERENCE on November 20 - 21, you can meet Kienle in person.
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Image: A physician wearing VR glasses. An image of the human heart floats in front of him in the air; Copyright: apoQlar

apoQlar

Virtual Surgical Intelligence: Microsoft Hololens in the OR

22/07/2019

Modern imaging opens news doors to surgeries. Yet it also poses major problems for surgeons: They use two-dimensional images to navigate through a three-dimensional surgical environment, while they continuously have to switch their focus back and forth between the images and the patient. Now help is on the way in the form of interactive 3D projections and mixed reality (MR).
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Image: Woman uses robot arm to grab something on the table; Copyright: RWTH Aachen/RPE & inRehaRob

Of exoskeletons and service robots – the future of rehabilitation

03/06/2019

For most people, enjoying a good quality of life means having the ability to move freely, safely and independently. Intensive and costly rehabilitation is needed if this is no longer an option after a stroke for example. We are introducing some projects that deliver innovative robotic solutions.
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Image: triangular table at which three patients do various robotic rehabilitation exercises; Copyright: Hocoma, Switzerland

Walking is an issue of mind over matter – how robots assist rehabilitation

03/06/2019

Humans are living longer than ever but still want to continue to live independently as they age. Meanwhile, our motor and cognitive abilities decline as we age, sometimes as the effects of a stroke. The number of people in need of long-term care is growing at breakneck speed. At the same time, fewer and fewer young people choose stressful careers as caregivers.
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Image: Boy with robotic gait trainer on treadmill; Copyright: panthermedia.net/olesiabilkei

Robotics – rehab with motors and sensors

03/06/2019

They work with power, precision and tirelessly. This makes robots an ideal instrument for rehabilitation. In gait or motor training, movement sequences must be repeated thousands of times so that they can be learnt anew. What tires the patient and costs the therapist's time can easily be managed by robot-assisted systems. Learn more about the possibilities of robotics in rehabilitation.
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Image: A hospital room with different monitors and medical devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Christopher Boswell

Hospital cybersecurity: secure technology and trained employees go hand in hand

02/05/2019

When it comes to IT, the medical sector has a dilemma: On the one hand, digitization and networks are designed to save both time and money. Yet on the other hand, medical systems, physician offices, and hospital networks don’t have nearly the same levels of protection as online stores, payment service providers or financial institutions. That’s also partially due to an absence of risk awareness.
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Image: A male and a female physician look at a tablet together; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Cybersecurity in the hospital: securely networked

02/05/2019

Digitalization and networking are supposed to serve the health care system well: In times of staff shortages and demographic change, they are able to support the exchange of patient data and the management of chronic diseases as well as to improve the workflow. But it is still often ignored that both individual devices and complete networks can become lucrative targets for cybercrimes.
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Image: Woman looks at the image of an injured soccer player on a tablet; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia Ltd.

Sports medicine: preventing injuries with wearable sensors

08/02/2019

The consequences of sports injuries can be very serious and sideline athletes for a long time. Although it often seems like these injuries happen in a split second, they can also be the result of overuse and loads that usually weaken the athlete over time. This stress can be detected and reduced with wearable technology and injuries prevented before they happen.
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