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Machine learning finds 'sound' words predict psychosis
A machine-learning method discovered a hidden clue in people's language predictive of the later emergence of psychosis - the frequent use of words associated with sound. A paper published by the journal npj Schizophrenia published the findings by scientists at Emory University and Harvard University.
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Diagnostics: A rapid, easy-to-use DNA amplification method
Scientists in Japan have developed a way of amplifying DNA on a scale suitable for use in the emerging fields of DNA-based computing and molecular robotics. By enabling highly sensitive nucleic acid detection, their method could improve disease diagnostics and accelerate the development of biosensors, for example, for food and environmental applications.
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Cloud-computing web platform for neuroscience research
Scientists in the United States, Europe and South America are reporting how a new cloud-computing web platform allows scientists to track data and analyses on the brain, potentially reducing delays in discovery. The project, called brainlife.io, is led by Franco Pestilli, associate professor at Indiana University, in collaboration with colleagues across the university.
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Microfluidic sensor: monitoring sickle cell disease
Sickle cell disease is a hereditary disorder that affects red blood cells, distorting their natural disc shape into a crescent moon or "sickle" shape. Normal red blood cells move freely through small vessels throughout the body to deliver oxygen. With sickle cell disease, the misshapen red blood cells become hard and sticky, making it difficult for them to move through blood vessels.
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Blood-brain barrier chip: using stem cells for the first time
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have, for the first time, duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB), creating a human BBB chip with stem cells, which can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders.
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Imaging: new modality targets cholesterol in arterial plaque
In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), "Frequency-domain differential photoacoustic radar: theory and validation for ultra-sensitive atherosclerotic plaque imaging," researchers demonstrate a new imaging modality that successfully identifies the presence of cholesterol in the arterial plaque.
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Blood-Brain Barrier Chip: in vivo-like drug and antibody transport
Like airport security barriers that either clear authorized travelers or block unauthorized travelers and their luggage from accessing central operation areas, the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) tightly controls the transport of essential nutrients and energy metabolites into the brain and staves off unwanted substances circulating in the blood stream.
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VR: visualize expansion microscopy data and illuminate new treatments
A combined research team from Carnegie Mellon University and Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason is pairing a nanoscale imaging technique with virtual reality (VR) technology to create a method that allows researchers to "step inside" their biological data.
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World Blood Donation Day: A small drop saves lives
Donating blood - the World Blood Donation Day has been held annually since 2004 on 14th June, the birthday of Karl Landsteiner, discoverer of blood groups. The day is intended to make people all over the world aware of the relevance of blood donations and donors. But what significance does blood donation have for human health? What activities will take place on this day?
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Computational system: tool pinpoints gut's bacteria
A UCLA-led research team has developed a faster and more accurate way to determine where the many bacteria that live in, and on, humans come from. Broadly, the tool can deduce the origins of any microbiome, a localized and diverse community of microscopic organisms.
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