Navigation of Stem Cells in Central Nervous System -- MEDICA Trade Fair

Image: Clipboard with restless-legs-syndrome written over it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Boris Zerwann

Restless legs syndrome study identifies 13 new genetic risk variants

18/10/2017

A new study into the genetics underlying restless legs syndrome has identified 13 previously-unknown genetic risk variants, while helping inform potential new treatment options for the condition.
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Image: thermal image of a mouse; Copyright: Nuria Matesanz, CNIC

A specific protein regulates the burning of body fat to generate heat

18/10/2017

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have identified a protein that holds promise as a target for therapies to reduce obesity.
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Image: abstract graphic about hereditary colon cancer; Copyright: IDIBELL

A new genetic marker accounts for up to 1.4 percent of cases of hereditary colon cancer

12/10/2017

The finding, once validated by other research groups, could allow patients with mutations in this gene to follow a clinical approach much more consistent with their genetics.
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Image: Immune cells are more activated (red) in the brains of mice with the gene TREM2 (left) than in those without the gene (right); Copyright: DAVID HOLTZMAN LAB

Alzheimer's gene poses both risk and benefits

10/10/2017

Study suggests role of inflammation in brain disease is complicated.
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How the lungs of premature babies can undergo damage

09/10/2017

Premature babies that need ventilation to support their breathing often suffer from a condition known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), have now discovered a molecular mechanism that plays a key role in the development of the disease.
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Foetal genes can increase the risk of illness during pregnancy

04/09/2017

For the first time, a relationship has been found between foetal genes and the risk of preeclampsia in the mother. Norwegian researchers, including a team from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), figure prominently in the international group that presented the find in "Nature Genetics", first published online earlier this summer.
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Image: a collection of antibiotics in a bowl; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Esben Hansen

Researchers identify the component that allows a lethal type of bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

01/09/2017

Scientists at IRB Barcelona identify a key component of the machinery that allows Staphylococcus aureus to transfer genes that confer antibiotic resistance.
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DNA sensor plays critical role in cancer immunotherapy via response to unexpected DNA form

31/08/2017

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.
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Image: strands of DNA in different colours; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Kheng Ho Toh

How cells hack their own genes

30/08/2017

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RNA: a vicious pathway to cancer?

25/08/2017

According to the current doctrine, cancer cells develop due to mutations in genomic DNA. But could it be also caused also by faulty RNA molecules? A number of clues are pointing to this surprising hypothesis.
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Genetic variants found to play key role in human immune system

17/08/2017

Genetic differences in immune response demonstrate interaction of genetics and environment linked to disease risk.
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Image: woman holding two models of a kidney in front of her upper body; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Ben Schonewille

Improved analysis of kidney cancer

14/08/2017

Every year, just over 1000 people are diagnosed with kidney cancer in Sweden. The three most common variants are clear cell, papillary and chromophobe renal cancer. Researchers compare the gene expression in tumour cells from a kidney cancer patient with cells from healthy tissue to figure out in which part of the kidney the cancer began and what went wrong in these cells.
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Image: Illustration of the Drosophila synaptonemal complex; Copyright: Ryan Kramer

Marriage of microscopy techniques reveals 3-D structure of critical protein complex

07/08/2017

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have solved the three-dimensional structure of a complex that is essential for the correct sorting of chromosomes into eggs and sperm during reproductive cell division or meiosis.
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Cell mechanism discovery could lead to "fundamental" change in leukemia treatment

01/08/2017

Researchers have identified a new cell mechanism that could lead to a fundamental change in the diagnosis and treatment of leukaemia.
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Image: human body with arteries and venes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pixelchaos

Tracking the mechanism of artery formation

01/08/2017

Arteriogenesis is a critical event – not only during development but also in adult life. Cardiovascular life-threatening events could be overcome for example by inducing the formation of new arteries. A team of scientists led by Ralf Adams from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine has developed a genetic approach in mice to uncover molecular mechanisms of arterial growth.
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Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Look over the shoulder of an eye surgeon who is operating at a microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/mearicon

Ophthalmology today and tomorrow: surgery and more

01/02/2017

Ophthalmology procedures and eye surgeries have been around since ancient times. Today we can hardly imagine the types of circumstances that surrounded any surgical procedures to our perhaps most important sense organ in those days and later eras. Meanwhile, the present and future of this medical specialty looks all the more promising.
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Image: Image of a bird in greyscale and blurred; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

Gene therapy for the treatment of achromatopsia

01/02/2017

Achromatopsia is a rare hereditary visual disorder. Along with total color blindness, patients most notably suffer from reduced visual acuity and increased sensitivity to light and glare.
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Photo: Child gets pierced into the finger using a lancing device

Diabetes: comprehensive prevention, early "vaccination"?

08/04/2016

A diagnosis of diabetes often catches new patients off guard - for instance if they end up in the emergency room suffering from metabolic decompensation. Children are often affected by this. Their immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas early on in their lives, thus causing type 1 diabetes.
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Human Genetics: "Physicians should be able to counsel patients on the process"

01/04/2016

Human genetics is the study of the genetic makeup of human beings. DNA, chromosomes, and genes are extensively analyzed by medical specialists. Physicians of Germany need to have a qualification in genetic counseling to successfully advise patients.
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Point-of-care-testing: from disc to diagnosis

22/02/2016

Easy solutions that deliver results quickly are a great asset in medicine: patients receive their diagnosis faster and physicians have more time to treat them. Such tools also work without sophisticated resources and trained personal. A device currently developed in a project funded by the European Commission could bring all of this to point-of-care-testing for infectious diseases.
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Multiple Sclerosis: does the colon affect the immune system?

01/12/2015

Multiple sclerosis apparently can strike anyone - regardless of age, family history, lifestyle or gender. Yet why then does it not strike everyone? Genetic and environmental factors appear not to be the only reason whether it develops or not. The countless microorganisms that colonize our intestinal tract could also be involved in this.
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Photo: laboratory staff evaluating DNA

Direct-To-Consumer Testing: the business with lifestyle tests

08/10/2015

The many possibilities the Internet offers also don’t shy away from laboratory medicine. The demand for biochemical or genetic tests continues to rise. Next to standard laboratory tests, a market developed in which the patient is the immediate recipient of clinical results. New distribution channels eliminate the physician as the responsible party.
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Cancer Immunotherapy: Individual mutations as new target structures

01/06/2015

A tumor is as unique as the person who is affected by it. For a long time, it was assumed this would make treatment more difficult since cancer drugs are not able to be one hundred percent effective in targeting the affected cells. In this interview with MEDICA.de, Professor Ugur Sahin explains why it is precisely these individual mutations that make him hopeful for a new type of therapy.
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Cancer prevention: Beneficial and ultimately personal

04/05/2015

There are many decisions to be made in an adult life; among them are cancer prevention screenings. They are voluntary and many people deliberate whether they should go or not and if they would actually want to know the results. Science, politics and health care professionals also ponder with each new preventive service whether it is beneficial and who should end up paying for it.
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Photo: interaction between the proteins

IBD: When genetics and environment interact

05/01/2015

T-cells are the guardians of our immune system. When they show changes, it can lead to severe inflammatory responses in the body. It is believed that the T-cells in persons who are affected by inflammatory bowel disease don’t work properly. Two proteins that can be found on activated T-cells and that interact with each other are now being analyzed.
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Genetics: “We try to simplify diagnosis for rare diseases“

10/11/2014

Sometimes your TV is actually right and diagnosing an illness is really a puzzle. This is the case with rare diseases for example, which only affect a small portion of the population. Physicians are then confronted with the problem of not having enough experience with a specific illness and its symptoms to be able to make a diagnosis.
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Vascular health in athletes

02/06/2014

"Sports are good for your health", as the saying goes. Regular exercise promotes the health of our blood vessels and prevents vascular diseases. However, many years of competitive sports can also have negative effects on vascular health and increase the risk of myocardial infarction. Prof. Martin Halle of the Technical University Munich explains at MEDICA.de what athletes need to pay attention to.
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