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Overview: News from the Editors

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Image: Two physicians in front of a computer; Copyright: Tohoku University

Imaging: A peek into lymph nodes

18/03/2019

A new method to diagnose cancer cells inside lymph nodes could allow doctors to treat cancers before they spread around the body
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Image: Doctor in front of a MRI-Scan of the brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Shannon Fagan

AI and MRIs at birth can predict cognitive development

18/03/2019

Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine used MRI brain scans and machine learning techniques at birth to predict cognitive development at age 2 years with 95 percent accuracy.
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Image: bioengineer Dr Chih-Tsung Yang pictured with the microfluidic cell culture chip in the foreground; Copyright: Joe Vittorio

Organ-on-a-chip: reducing side effects of radiotherapy

15/03/2019

The debilitating side effects of radiotherapy could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a breakthrough by University of South Australia (UniSA) and Harvard University researchers. UniSA biomedical engineer Professor Benjamin Thierry is leading an international study using organ-on-a-chip technology to develop 3D models to test the effects of different levels and types of radiation.
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Image: body center of a person from the side with wearable on the wrist; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AllaSerebrina

Wearables: thermal sensors to manage body-focused repetitive behaviors

15/03/2019

In a new study published in npj Digital Medicine, a team led by Child Mind Institute researchers report that a wearable tracking device they developed achieves higher accuracy in position tracking using thermal sensors in addition to inertial measurement and proximity sensors.
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Image: close-up of a crying young woman; Copyright: panthermedia.net/IgorTishenko

Data science: treatments for depression

14/03/2019

Major depressive disorder is a debilitating illness that affects more than 350 million people around the world. The most common treatments for depression are Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), drugs such as Prozac that increase serotonin levels in some regions of the brain. About half of the patients who take the pills, however, do not respond to treatment.
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Image: graphic showing how Usiigaci works; Copyright: OIST

Machine learning tracks moving cells

14/03/2019

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists have long struggled to quantify the movement and changing morphology of cells through time, but now, scientists have devised an elegant tool to do just that.
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Image: physician shows pregnant woman her ultrasound images; Copyright: ByLove

Imaging: revealing life-threatening pregnancy disorder

13/03/2019

An imaging technique used to detect some forms of cancer can also help detect preeclampsia in pregnancy before it becomes a life-threatening condition, a new Tulane study says.
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Image: graphic showing the function of the hydrogel contact lens; Copyright: UNH/UCD

Ophthalmology: hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease

13/03/2019

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have created a hydrogel that could one day be made into a contact lens to more effectively treat corneal melting, a condition that is a significant cause for blindness world-wide.
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Image: SniffPhone prototype; Copyright: JLM Innovation GmbH

mHealth: SniffPhone detects cancer from breath

12/03/2019

SniffPhone, currently in its prototype phase, enables early diagnosis of gastric cancer from a person's exhaled breath. The new method may revolutionise cancer screening all over the world. VTT has participated to the development of SniffPhone prototype and concept with nine other project partners.
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Image: head of a person with an electrode netting; Copyright: Brian Strickland

Brain stimulation improves depression symptoms

12/03/2019

With a weak alternating electrical current sent through electrodes attached to the scalp, UNC School of Medicine researchers successfully targeted a naturally occurring electrical pattern in a specific part of the brain and markedly improved depression symptoms in about 70 percent of participants in a clinical study.
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