News from the Editors -- MEDICA - World Forum for Medicine

MEDICA Newsletter

Social Media

Image: woman working with microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ Fabrice Michaudeau

'lab-on-a-chip' detects cancer faster

05/03/2019

A new ultrasensitive diagnostic device invented by researchers at the University of Kansas, The University of Kansas Cancer Center and KU Medical Center could allow doctors to detect cancer quickly from a droplet of blood or plasma, leading to timelier interventions and better outcomes for patients.
Read more
Image: A man and a woman working in a laboratory; Copyright: Jan-Peter Kasper/University Jena

Test system helps preventing chronic inflammation

25/02/2019

An international research team led by Friedrich Schiller University in Jena has developed a highly sensitive cell model to study the complex effects – and side effects – of anti-inflammatory drugs, with the ultimate aim of preventing chronic inflammation.
Read more
Image: brain with syringe and medication; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Michael Osterrieder

Breakthrough for brain tumor drug development

07/02/2019

24,000 patients are diagnosed with brain tumors every year with the 5yr survival for high grade glioblastomas (GBM) only 5%, with median survival of 15 months. These poor statistics have remained static for 30 years due in part to a lack of preclinical models for testing new drugs.
Read more
Image: Artificial intelligence-tool; Copyright: Nature/Nigam Shah, Adrien Coulet

Artificial intelligence-tool for chemotherapy dosages

05/02/2019

Finding the right dose of medication by trial and error can be a painful experience for patients. Thanks to a new algorithm created by Adrien Coulet, lecturer at the Université de Lorraine and researcher in a joint Inria and Loria team, in collaboration with researchers from Stanford University, an innovative tool can predict in advance whether patients will need a lower dose of medication.
Read more
Image: Woman jogging on the beach and crab loop; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Rawpixel

Act(ive) against cancer - World Cancer Day 2019

04/02/2019

On February 4th is World Cancer Day. The World Cancer Organization (UICC) launched this day in 2007 to raise awareness of various cancers. This year, the focus lies in particular on the prevention and early detection of cancer. In addition, people will be informed about diagnostic, therapeutic and follow-up options.
Read more
Image: microvessel-on-a-chip; Copyright: 2019 Yukiko Matsunaga, Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

Microvessel-on-a-chip sheds light on angiogenesis

04/02/2019

To provide sufficient oxygen to tissues and organs within the body, blood vessels need to sprout new offshoots to form a widespread blood supply network, much like the trunk, branches, and twigs of a tree. However, the mechanisms by which this sprouting occurs, in both normal healthy conditions and in conditions like cancer, have remained unclear.
Read more
Image: Doctor AIzimov – an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics; Copyright: Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University

New intelligent system for lung cancer diagnostics

04/02/2019

Researches from Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU), Russian Academic Excellence Initiative participant, in collaboration with the radiologists from St.Petersburg Clinical Research for Specialized Types of Medical Care have developed an intelligent software system for lung cancer diagnostics. It analyzes patients' computed tomography (CT) results within 20 seconds.
Read more
Image: An older man and an older woman in a swimming pool; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Zoltan Okolicsanyi

The healing effect of radon

29/01/2019

Natural thermal water that contains radon has been used for over 100 years to treat chronic degenerative, inflammatory and musculoskeletal conditions. Most patients experience a significant reduction in pain after treatment with radon, but the molecular mechanisms behind the treatment are largely unexplored.
Read more
Image: A man and a woman in the laboratory; Copyright:A. Battenberg / TUM

Evolution of signaling molecules

24/01/2019

Small infections can be fatal: Millions of people die each year from sepsis, an overreaction of the immune system. A new immune signaling molecule, designed by a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), now provides the basis for potential new approaches in sepsis therapy.
Read more
Image: Healthy mucus layer (red) keeping Escherichia coli (green) at a safe distance within the colon, preventing them from breaking throug; Copyright: Bahtiyar Yilmaz, University of Bern

Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

22/01/2019

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy.
Read more
Image: ampoule with blood; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis

21/01/2019

In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
Read more
Image: 3D-printed absorber for endovascular treatment of liver cancer; Copyright: UCSF graphic

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

11/01/2019

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.
Read more
Image: esophageal tumors; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sciencepics

Mapping residual esophageal tumors - a glimpse into the future?

10/01/2019

It's one of the first questions asked by many cancer patients "What are my chances of beating this?" Often there is no clear answer, with survival rates differing widely. Post-operative testing that provides an accurate prediction of long-term treatment outcomes is the next best thing, allowing clinicians to plan further treatment and more accurately inform patients about their prognoses.
Read more
Image: Killer T cells attack an infectious cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Andreus

How herpesviruses shape the immune system

09/01/2019

Cytomegalovirus is widespread and remains in the body for a lifetime after infection. In healthy individuals, this virus is usually kept in check but can become dangerous when the immune system is weakened or during pregnancy. DZIF scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed an analytic method that can very precisely detect viral infections using immune responses.
Read more
Image: MRSA-Text on the keyboard on which lies a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / masuti

Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks

08/01/2019

A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals. The researchers demonstrate a new, more effective method to prevent their spread.
Read more
Image: Three men in suits and a woman in a laboratory coat are standing in a laboratory; Copyright: Ministry of Economy of Mecklenburg-Hither Pomerania/Norbert Fellechner

On the trail of cancer: personalized cancer vaccine

01/03/2018

Conventional cancer treatment selection typically depends on the location of the tumor. However, this approach ignores the distinct gene mutations in the tumor of the individual patient. New cancer research approaches increasingly emphasize the concept of personalized therapy.
Read more
Image: Collage of several MRI images of the heart, in which different locations are marked with red arrows; Copyright: University Hospital Münster/Ali Yilmaz

Myocarditis: more specific diagnosis thanks to molecular imaging

01/09/2017

There are many causes of myocarditis or inflammation of the heart muscle. Oftentimes, the culprits are viruses or bacteria and sometimes even an acute heart attack. Regardless of the cause, it creates a challenge for cardiologists: a diagnosis tends to be only nonspecific without a biopsy. A cardiac MRI and molecular imaging promise to provide assistance.
Read more
Image: A petri dish with yellow bacterial cultures on a black ground; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kwanchaichaiudom

Laboratory medicine: confronting infections with speed and foresight

03/04/2017

The laboratory is one of the most important and pivotal bastions in patient care. In the laboratory, acute, chronic and genetic diseases are diagnosed, the progression of diseases such as diabetes is regularly checked or specialists look for biomarkers to adapt cancer therapies.
Read more