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Image: ampoule with blood; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ktsdesign

New blood tests for TB could accelerate diagnosis

21/01/2019

In the largest study to date of rapid TB tests used by the NHS, a team led by researchers at Imperial College London found that available tests are not sensitive enough to rule out a diagnosis of TB in suspected cases, and so have limited clinical use.
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Image: man having a heart attack; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kzenon

Home-based hypertension program produces 'striking' results

21/01/2019

Pilot study by Brigham investigators finds that an innovative care-delivery program helped 81 percent of participants achieve blood pressure control in seven weeks.
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Image: 3D model of a brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net/renjith krishnan.r

Mapping the brain at high resolution

18/01/2019

Researchers have developed a new way to image the brain with unprecedented resolution and speed. Using this approach, they can locate individual neurons, trace connections between them, and visualize organelles inside neurons, over large volumes of brain tissue.
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Image: three images of someone walking with the help of the prosthetic knee; Copyright: Helen Huang

Using AI to train robotic prosthetics

18/01/2019

Researchers from North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina and Arizona State University have developed an intelligent system for "tuning" powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner.
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Image: Professor explains something at a whiteboard to two young people with laptops; Copyright: Virginia Tech

Machine learning to decrease brain injury deaths

17/01/2019

To help physicians decrease the number of deaths resulting from traumatic brain injuries, Chandan Reddy of Virginia Tech will use new machine learning techniques for computational models to predict short- and long-term outcomes, categorize traumatic brain injury patients, and provide interventions tailored to a specific patient and his or her injury.
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Image: Pensioner sitting on the couch in the living room looking at photos; Copyright: panthermedia.net/AndrewLozovyi

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

17/01/2019

UTI is an infection of any part of the urinary system, from the kidneys to the bladder. The symptoms include pain in the lower part of the stomach, blood in urine, needing to urinate suddenly or more often than usual and changes in mood and behaviour.
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Image: 3D printed, two-millimeter implant under the microscope; Copyright: Jacob Koffler and Wei Zhu, UC San Diego

3D printed implant promotes nerve cell growth

16/01/2019

For the first time, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Institute of Engineering in Medicine have used rapid 3D printing technologies to create a spinal cord, then successfully implanted that scaffolding, loaded with neural stem cells, into sites of severe spinal cord injury in rats.
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Image: view in a café with many talking teens; Copyright: Oticon

AI makes life easier for hearing aid users

15/01/2019

For people with hearing loss it can be very difficult to understand and separate voices in noisy environments. This problem may soon be history thanks to a new groundbreaking algorithm that is designed to recognize and separate voices efficiently in unknown sound environments.
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Image: robot hand and human hand are going to shake hands in front of a laptop; Copyright: MedUni Vienna

Bionic reconstruction after amputation of a hand

15/01/2019

Modern prostheses offer patients who have had a hand amputated much greater capability in everyday life than was possible with previous prosthetic reconstructive techniques. Redundant nerves from the amputated extremity can be surgically transferred to provide a much better connection between the patient’s body and the prosthesis.
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Image: Cryo-electron microscope images; Copyright: Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP)

Powerful microscope revolutionizes cell insights

14/01/2019

There are many times when our cells need to move. Mobile cells guide our body's formation (embryonic development). Immune cells roam to capture unwanted intruders. And healing cells (fibroblasts) migrate to mend wounds. But not all movement is desirable: Tumors are most dangerous when cancer cells gain the ability to travel throughout the body (metastasis).
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Image: a woman and two men in FAU's Office of Information Technology; Copyright: Alex Dolce, Florida Atlantic University

New AI and deep learning laboratory in Florida

14/01/2019

FAU's College of Engineering and Computer Science, in collaboration with researchers from FAU's Schmidt College of Medicine and FAU's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, has received a $652,820 grant from the NSF to establish the first NSF-funded Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning (AIDL) Training and Research Laboratory in Florida.
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Image: 3D-printed absorber for endovascular treatment of liver cancer; Copyright: UCSF graphic

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

11/01/2019

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.
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Image: index finger of a hand points to a printed text; Copyright: panthermedia.net / j.dudzinski

AI approach outperformed experts in identifying cervical precancer

11/01/2019

A research team led by investigators from the National Institutes of Health and Global Good has developed a computer algorithm that can analyze digital images of a woman's cervix and accurately identify precancerous changes that require medical attention. This artificial intelligence (AI) approach, called automated visual evaluation.
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Image: esophageal tumors; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sciencepics

Mapping residual esophageal tumors - a glimpse into the future?

10/01/2019

It's one of the first questions asked by many cancer patients "What are my chances of beating this?" Often there is no clear answer, with survival rates differing widely. Post-operative testing that provides an accurate prediction of long-term treatment outcomes is the next best thing, allowing clinicians to plan further treatment and more accurately inform patients about their prognoses.
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Image: Stethoscope wraps alarm clock on wooden table; Copyright: panthermedia.net / mattkusb

Tiny digital 'tags' improve eye care by tracking every step

10/01/2019

Called radio-frequency identification (or RFID), the tool helps streamline operations by knowing where everything is and where everything goes. It can help a large store maintain a clearer picture of inventory counts, for example. At the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, RFID serves another purpose: to track and reduce patient wait time and enhance time spent at the doctor's office.
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Image: Killer T cells attack an infectious cell; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Andreus

How herpesviruses shape the immune system

09/01/2019

Cytomegalovirus is widespread and remains in the body for a lifetime after infection. In healthy individuals, this virus is usually kept in check but can become dangerous when the immune system is weakened or during pregnancy. DZIF scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed an analytic method that can very precisely detect viral infections using immune responses.
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Image: The Digital Precision Cancer Medicine Platform; Copyright: University of Helsinki

Digital health to support precision cancer medicine in iCAN

09/01/2019

The Academy of Finland has selected the "iCAN Digital Precision Cancer Medicine" competence cluster as one of Finland's six flagships. The iCAN public-private partnership forms a platform aiming to improve the treatment of cancer patients and to support innovations coming from high quality research.
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Image: MRSA-Text on the keyboard on which lies a stethoscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / masuti

Computer model shows how to better control MRSA outbreaks

08/01/2019

A research team led by scientists at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health report on a new method to help health officials control outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, a life-threatening antibiotic-resistant infection often seen in hospitals. The researchers demonstrate a new, more effective method to prevent their spread.
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Image: Sock TelePark; Copyright: Marc Eisele, University Hospital Dresden

Better living thanks to telemedicine – “TelePark“- project targets patients with Parkinson’s disease

08/01/2019

Parkinson's disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that primarily affects movement of patients and makes their everyday lives very challenging. It also makes regular doctor appointments and treatment sessions necessary. "TelePark" - a project that collects different movement-related parameters using sensors and apps is designed to improve the quality of life for Parkinson’s patients.
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Image: Philip Miller with the new microneedle technique; Copyright: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories

Microneedles technique for quicker diagnoses of major illnesses

08/01/2019

When people are in the early stages of an undiagnosed disease, immediate tests that lead to treatment are the best first steps. But a blood draw - usually performed by a medical professional armed with an uncomfortably large needle - might not be quickest, least painful or most effective method, according to new research.
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Image: Label-free intraoperative nonlinear imaging of the tumor microenvironment; Copyright: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Imaging technique brings diagnostic potential into operating room

07/01/2019

A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers led by Prof. Stephen Boppart has successfully visualized the tumor microenvironment of human breast tissue after it was surgically removed from a patient in the operating room by using a new portable optical imaging system. This work marks a major step toward providing cancer researchers with a tool for tracking tumor progression.
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Image: breath test for multiple cancers; Copyright: Owlstone Medical Ltd

Clinical trial launches to develop breath test for multiple cancers

07/01/2019

Researchers have launched a clinical trial to develop a breath test, analysing molecules that could indicate the presence of cancer at an early stage. This is the first test of its kind to investigate multiple cancer types.
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Image: digital capture of an eye; Copyright: panthermedia.net / cosmin momir

A digital look inside the human eye – when algorithms diagnose Diabetes

02/01/2019

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes has become very common and is often described as a lifestyle disease. More and more people are suffering from this chronic metabolic disorder. Next to established diagnostic procedures, digital retinal screening has shown to be successful - a promising technique that will also play an important role in the diagnosis of other diseases in the future.
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Image: Woman at the table operating a smartphone and surrounded by utensils for diabetes therapy; Copyright: panthemedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Diabetes digital – smart support for diabetics

02/01/2019

Monitoring blood sugar levels, counting carbohydrates, calculating insulin doses, and keeping accurate records - diabetes is a data-intensive disease that demands a lot of self-discipline and attention from the patients. Some concerns are patients neglecting to keep a food journal, "fudged" test results or calculation errors. Digital solutions help patients easily manage the large volumes of data.
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Image: On the left, an expanded human cell with microtubules (blue) and a pair of centrioles (yellow-red) in the middle; Copyright: Fabian Zwettler / University of Würzburg

Progress in Super-Resolution Microscopy

19/12/2018

Does expansion microscopy deliver true-to-life images of cellular structures? That was not sure yet. A new publication in "Nature Methods" shows for the first time that the method actually works reliably.
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Image: Woman puts her arms around the retina scanner and looks smilingly to the side into the camera; Copyright: Mimo AG

Collect, process, communicate – retina measurements with Mimo

19/12/2018

Continuous monitoring is an essential process with every disease. In the case of eye disorders, frequent retina measurements can facilitate early detection of deterioration to quickly initiate intervention. This calls for comprehensive care settings, easy ways to take measurements and prompt results. However, in reality, this is rarely the case.
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Image: Systic fibrosis treatment; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Ibrfzhjpf.gmail.com

Blood test could lead to cystic fibrosis treatment

14/12/2018

Researchers at Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago used a blood test and microarray technology to identify distinct molecular signatures in children with cystic fibrosis. These patterns of gene expression could help predict disease severity and treatment response, and lead to therapies tailored to each patient's precise biology.
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Image: Schematic model of ChIL reaction; Copyright: Yuko Sato (Tokyo Institute of Technology)

When less is more: Approach for low-cell-number epigenomic profiling

14/12/2018

Scientists at Kyushu University and Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a technique that enables analysis of DNA-protein interactions using very small numbers of cells, ranging from 100 to 1,000. Their method could capture previously unexamined epigenomic information, facilitate biomarker discovery and open new avenues for precision medicine.
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Image: Interferometric microscope equipped with a high-speed camera; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Viktor Cap

Technology that sees nerve cells fire

13/12/2018

Researchers at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, have created a noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire based on changes in shape. The method could be used to observe nerve activity in light-accessible parts of the body, such as the eye, which would allow physicians to quantitatively monitor visual function at the cellular level.
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 Image: anatomy, muscles of a human being; Copyright: panthermedia.net / stihii

Promising technique to generate new muscle cells in lab

13/12/2018

To help patients with muscle disorders, scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have engineered a new stem cell line to study the conversion of stem cells into muscle. Findings appeared in Cell Reports.
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Image: patient and doctor during mammography; Copyright: panthermedia.net / luminastock

Digital mammography increases breast cancer detection

12/12/2018

The shift from film to digital mammography increased the detection of breast cancer by 14 percent overall in the United Kingdom without increasing the recall rate, according to a major new study.
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Image: New deformable particle model; Copyright: Mark Shattuck, CCNY

Shape shifting cell breakthrough

12/12/2018

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.
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Image: whole-brain activity map; Copyright: iob.ch

Whole-brain imaging of mice during behavior

11/12/2018

In a study published in Neuron, Emilie Macé from Botond Roska’s group and collaborators demonstrate how functional ultrasound imaging can yield high-resolution, brain-wide activity maps of mice for specific behaviors. The non-invasive technology has promising applications for ophthalmologic, neurologic and psychiatric diseases.
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Image: microscopic images of cancer cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / raspirator

Cancer cells distinguished by artificial intelligence-based system

11/12/2018

Osaka University researchers have developed a system using artificial intelligence that can automatically differentiate between different types of cancer cell.
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Image: doctor and brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / rfphoto

PET scans to optimize tuberculosis meningitis treatments

10/12/2018

Tuberculosis of the brain - or tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) - is often deadly, always hard to treat, and a particular threat to young children. It may leave survivors with lifelong brain damage. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have used PET scans, a rabbit model and the TB drug rifampin to advance physicians' understanding of this disease.
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Image: Hand of a robot; Copyright: panthermedia.net / VitalikRadko

World's first robotic bilateral breast reconstruction

10/12/2018

A team of surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are the first in the world to use a surgical robot to assist with a bilateral free flap breast reconstruction - a procedure in which tissue is taken from the lower abdomen and used to rebuild the breast. The robot allows surgeons to make a much smaller incision into the abdominal wall muscles.
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Image: The MPI team: Noelia Díaz, Kai Kruse and Juanma Vaquerizas; Copyright: MPI Münster

Nuclear architecture diagnostics within reach of the clinic

07/12/2018

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Biomedicine in Münster and of the Medical Faculty of the University of Münster have developed a technique that allows the characterisation of the three-dimensional organisation of the DNA in the nucleus directly in patient's cells.
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Image: How graphene can be used; Copyright: Berry Research Laboratory, UIC

Using graphene to detect ALS

06/12/2018

The wonders of graphene are numerous. Now, the "supermaterial" may one day be used to test for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS – a progressive, neurodegenerative disease which is diagnosed mostly by ruling out other disorders, according to new research from the University of Illinois at Chicago published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.
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Image: illustration of the technique; Copyright: Chun Lab Yale

Scientists know where your eyes will look

05/12/2018

Using precise brain measurements, Yale researchers predicted how people's eyes move when viewing natural scenes, an advance in understanding the human visual system that can improve a host of artificial intelligence efforts, such as the development of driverless cars, said the researchers.
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Image: Rob Mannino (right),Wilbur Lam (left); Copyright: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech

No bleeding required: anemia detection via smartphone

05/12/2018

Biomedical engineers have developed a smartphone app for the non-invasive detection of anemia. Instead of a blood test, the app uses photos of someone's fingernails taken on a smartphone to accurately measure how much hemoglobin is in their blood.
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Image: residents discuss information displayed on a laptop; Copyright: Justin Torner

Tele-ERs can help strengthen rural hospitals

04/12/2018

A new study from the University of Iowa finds rural hospitals that use tele-medicine to back up their emergency room health care providers not only save money, but find it easier to recruit new physicians.
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Image: Keisuke Nagawa; Copyright: UC Davis Health

Retail outlets using telehealth pose significant privacy concerns

04/12/2018

A significant shift in the health care market is well underway, with various insurers, medical groups, vendors and supply chains pursuing acquisitions and mergers to expand their services, and retail outlets, from Walmart and Amazon to Rite-Aid and Albertsons, delivering health care services, including telehealth.
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Image: Woman with electrodes in her neck; Copyright: panthermedia.net / microgen

Back to health – when electrical pulses provide healing

03/12/2018

Strengthening and healing thanks to the power of electrical pulses - is that really possible? When mobility is restricted or muscles are no longer as strong as they used to be, electrical treatment options can lead to improvement or even cure of diseases. But why are more and more people turning to these alternatives, what are the advantages and what are their limitations and drawbacks?
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Image: Dr. Yuval Rinkevich; Copyright: Helmholtz Zentrum München

Targeting scar-free wound healing

03/12/2018

Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app. Few clinically-tested mobile apps exist today with clear measurable goals to support continued care of cancer survivors and patients.
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Image: smartphone with healthcare app; Copyright: Houston Methodist

App helps breast cancer survivors

03/12/2018

Breast cancer survivors who used a smartphone app created at Houston Methodist consistently lost weight, largely due to daily, real-time interactions with their health care team via the mobile app. Few clinically-tested mobile apps exist today with clear measurable goals to support continued care of cancer survivors and patients.
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Image: smart medical device; Copyright: NTU Singapore

Medical device for early intervention of congestive heart failure

30/11/2018

A research team from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) have invented a smart handheld medical device that could enable early intervention for patients with congestive heart failure.
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Image: Sensitive MRI diagnostics; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Arne Trautmann

Sensitive MRI diagnostics thanks to "elastic" contrast media

30/11/2018

Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods. An “elastic” protein structure can absorb dissolved xenon in a self-regulating way: The greater the amount of this noble gas, the higher the quality of the image.
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Image: MRI post ablation; Copyright: Radiological Society of North America

Cryoablation shows promise in treating low-risk breast cancers

29/11/2018

Cryoablation-the destruction of cancer cells through freezing-shows early indications of effectiveness in treating women with low-risk breast cancers, according to research being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Researchers said that over the four years of the study, there has only been one case of cancer recurrence out of 180 patients.
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Image: LION LBD; Copyright: panthermedia.net / HASLOO

AI system may accelerate search for cancer discoveries

29/11/2018

Searching through the mountains of published cancer research could be made easier for scientists, thanks to a new AI system.
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Image: Brainwaves; Copyright: panthermedia.net / drnn

Imaging technology measures magnetite levels in the brain

28/11/2018

Investigators at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have used magnetoencephalography (MEG) - a technology that measures brain activity by detecting the weak magnetic fields produced by the brain's normal electrical currents - to measure levels of the iron-based mineral called magnetite in the human brain.
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 Image: muscles; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Florea Paul

Microscope measures muscle weakness

28/11/2018

Biotechnologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a system to measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings, and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous.
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Image: Thymus; Copyright: panthermedia.net / CLIPAREA

Researchers develop new surgical technique for studying the thymus

27/11/2018

Elisa Oltra, head of the Genetic Exppression and Immunity group of the Faculty of Medicine at the Catholic University of Valencia (UCV), in collaboration with Alejandro Caicedo, professor of the Department of Medicine of the University of Miami, have developed a surgical process which makes it possible to place functional fragments of the thymus in the anterior chamber of the eyes of mice.
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Image: Participant in the BrainGate clinical trial controls a tablet computer; Copyright: BrainGate Collaboration

Brain-computer interface for people with paralysis

27/11/2018

Tablets and other mobile computing devices are part of everyday life, but using them can be difficult for people with paralysis. New research from the BrainGate* consortium shows that a brain-computer interface (BCI) can enable people with paralysis to directly operate an off-the-shelf tablet device just by thinking about making cursor movements and clicks.
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Image: Darmkrebs; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Sebastian Kaulitzki

Screening for colorectal cancer spares intense treatments

26/11/2018

Colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in the world. Every year in Finland, approximately 3,000 new cases are diagnosed, and roughly 1,200 patients die of it. Between 2004 and 2016, an extensive screening programme was conducted in Finland, intending to study the potential benefits and downsides of a nation-wide screening for colorectal cancer.
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Image: Doctor on a computer display examines RNA-sequences; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Lev Dolgachov

New technique improves single cell RNA sequencing

26/11/2018

In the era of personalized medicine, scientists are using new genetic and genomic insights to help them determine the best treatment for a given patient. In the case of cancer, the first step toward these treatments is an investigation into how tumor cells behave in an effort to figure out the best drugs to use to attack them.
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Image: 2D-spectroscopy illustration; Copyright: Lukas Bruder

New insight into molecular processes

23/11/2018

A research team headed by Prof. Frank Stienkemeier and Dr. Lukas Bruder of the University of Freiburg’s Institute of Physics has succeeded for the first time in applying 2D-spectroscopy to isolated molecular systems and thus in tracing the interactive processes at a molecular level more precisely.
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Image: 3D-muscle illustration; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Eraxion

Microscope measures muscle weakness

23/11/2018

Biotechnologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a system to accurately measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous.
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Image: surgeon performs surgery on the back of a hand ; Copyright: Istock.com/lissart

Biopatch improves cellular observation and drug delivery

22/11/2018

Purdue University researchers have developed a new flexible and translucent base for silicon nanoneedle patches to deliver exact doses of biomolecules directly into cells and expand observational opportunities.
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Image: areas of reduced fractional anisotropy - a diffusion MR imaging marker of white matter damage ; Copyright: RSNA

Researchers use MRI to predict Alzheimer's disease

22/11/2018

MRI brain scans perform better than common clinical tests at predicting which people will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).
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Image: Proband with a neuroprosthesis; Copyright: MoreGrasp

MoreGrasp – being able to grasp again with paraplegia

22/11/2018

Every year between 250.000 and 500.000 people suffer a spinal cord injury, MoreGrasp is intended to make their lives easier. The project aims to restore the lost gripping function in people with high paraplegia. Researchers at Graz University of Technology have developed a neuroprosthesis that is currently undergoing a feasibility study.
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Image: binary code; Copyright: panthermedia.net / JCBProd

Machine learning: predict emergency admission

21/11/2018

Machine learning - a field of artificial intelligence that uses statistical techniques to enable computer systems to "learn" from data - can be used to analyse electronic health records and predict the risk of emergency hospital admissions, a new study from The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found
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Image: Electron microscope image; Copyright: UNH

More effective hydrogel for healing wounds

21/11/2018

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have created an easy-to-make, low-cost injectable hydrogel that could help wounds heal faster, especially for patients with compromised health issues.
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Image: TFIID; Copyright: Eva Nogales lab, UC Berkeley

Microscopy captures molecule's "lock-and-load" on DNA

20/11/2018

Pushing the limits of cryo-electron microscopy, University of California, Berkeley, scientists have captured freeze-frames of the changing shape of a huge molecule, one of the body's key molecular machines, as it locks onto DNA and loads the machinery for reading the genetic code.
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Image: two doctors watching on a computer monitor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Lev Dolgachov

Computer classifies breast cancer tumors

20/11/2018

Using technology similar to the type that powers facial and speech recognition on a smartphone, researchers at the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have trained a computer to analyze breast cancer images and then classify the tumors with high accuracy.
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Image: Tiffany Victor at the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe; Copyright: Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria

19/11/2018

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) – a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory – have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria with higher spatial resolution than ever before.
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Image: Simplified causal Bayesian network; Copyright: Olli-Pekka Ryynänen / UEF

Artificial intelligence predicts treatment effectiveness

19/11/2018

How can a doctor predict the treatment outcome of an individual patient? Traditionally, the effectiveness of medical treatments is studied by randomised trials where patients are randomly divided into two groups: one of the groups is given treatment, and the other a placebo. Is this really the only reliable way to evaluate treatment effectiveness, or could something be done differently?
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Image: polyol-modified nanoparticles checking out blood vessels surrounding the tumors; Copyright: Yoon Yeo/Purdue University

Cancer identity technology makes it easier to find tumor's "address"

16/11/2018

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right "address" in the body while also easing the painful side effects of chemotherapy on patients. One of the big issues with chemotherapy is that most treatment approaches focus on the tumor itself without paying attention to the microenvironment surrounding the tumor.
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Image: Influenza viruses; Copyright: panthermedia.net / ralwel

FluChip-8G tested for rapid characterization of influenza viruses

16/11/2018

Duke and Duke Kunshan University collaborating with InDevR Inc. to test the new influenza subtyping assay for enhanced surveillance.
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Image: Hwan Choi (left) holds an implant; Copyright: UCF: Karen Norum

Prosthetics: Cranking up the power

09/11/2018

Amputees who use powered prosthetic ankles may be able to avoid the energetic costs typically associated with prosthetics by cranking up the power provided by their devices.
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Image: Prostata under microscope; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Martin Kreutz

Prostate cancer radiotherapy can be more precisely targeted

09/11/2018

Current standard imaging techniques for initial staging of prostate cancer often underestimate the extent of disease beyond the prostate. A study featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's November issue demonstrates that prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can pinpoint prostate cancer locations with superior accuracy.
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Image: the model of a kidney with gripping tools and the adhesive; Copyright: Purenum GmbH

A clean kidney: Break then glue

08/11/2018

Not enough exercise, an unhealthy diet: Kidney stones develop when urine contains too many insoluble compounds and are now one of the most common diseases worldwide. The ailment annually affects 1.2 million people in Germany alone. The stones are broken up and taken out via endoscopic surgery. Now it’s possible to remove even the tiniest residual fragments. The solution: a biocompatible adhesive.
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Image: Foreground: One DNA stripe, Background: One DNA stripe and a harddrive ; Copyright: Patrick Bal/TU Darmstadt

Health data under lock and key

08/11/2018

Researchers from the Collaborative Research Center CROSSING at Technische Universität Darmstadt have developed a solution that will ensure decades of safe storage for sensitive health data in a joint project with Japanese and Canadian partners. An initial prototype was presented during a recent conference in Beijing, China. The system will go into trial operation in Japan in the coming weeks.
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Image: A sensor which illuminates an armwrist with red light ; Copyright: Yasser Khan, Arias Research Group, UC Berkeley

Skin-like sensor maps blood-oxygen levels

08/11/2018

A new flexible sensor developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can map blood-oxygen levels over large areas of skin, tissue and organs, potentially giving doctors a new way to monitor healing wounds in real time.
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Image: Tooth on a green glove; Copyright: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

New material may make broken fillings a thing of the past

07/11/2018

Soon you may no longer have to worry about how long your dental repairs will last. A new dental reconstruction material developed in Sweden offers unprecedented improvements over existing acrylate-based fillers.
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Image: PET images from a brain; Copyright: Radiological Society of North America

AI predicts Alzheimer's years before diagnosis

07/11/2018

Artificial intelligence (AI) technology improves the ability of brain imaging to predict Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the journal Radiology.
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Image: The Nightwatch bracelet; Copyright: LivAssured

New epilepsy warning device could save thousands of lives

06/11/2018

A new high-tech bracelet, developed by scientists from the Netherlands detects 85 percent of all severe night-time epilepsy seizures. That is a much better score than any other technology currently available.
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Image: Prof. Regine Willumeit-Römer holds an implant; Copyright: HZG/Carsten Neff

EU funds doctoral training with around 4 million euros

06/11/2018

As part of the Marie Skłodowska Curie Action (MSCA), which has just been launched, 15 young researchers investigate biodegradable magnesium implants. The project is coordinated by the Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG); it brings together eight universities and research institutions as well as four technology companies from eight European countries.
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Image: fluorescent marker in use; Copyright: Colin Watts

New fluorescent marker

05/11/2018

A chemical that highlights tumour cells has been used by surgeons to help spot and safely remove brain cancer in a trial presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference.
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Image: Jorge Serrador with the electrical stimulator ; Copyright: Nick Romanenko, Rutgers University

New device improves balance in veterans with Gulf War Illness

05/11/2018

Gulf War veterans with unexplained illnesses that cause fatigue, headaches, respiratory disorders and memory problems can improve their balance with a device developed by Rutgers University researchers.
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Image: One presses on screen with security key; Copyright: panthermedia.net/welcomia

Digitization: Hospitals as Popular Targets?

02/11/2018

It’s safe to say that patients and their prompt medical care take center stage at any hospital. Digitization of the healthcare sector is quickly advancing to make this a reality: data is stored in a digital medium, devices are linked together. But how safe are hospitals in the age of innovation?
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Image: Brain; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Wavebreakmedia Itd.

Brain infection or cancer? A new rapid test could hold the answer

02/11/2018

When patients present with neurologic symptoms such as severe headaches or seizures, the symptoms could suggest anything from infection, cancer, or an autoimmune disease of the brain or spinal cord. The differences in diagnosis can mean having mere hours to act. Researchers at Jefferson have developed a test that could rapidly parse out infections of the brain from other diseases.
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Image: Robots and Artificial Intelligence; Copyright: panthermedia.net / sdecoret

"Dr. Algorithm suggests the best treatment option"

02/11/2018

The technology of the 20th century is progressing faster than ever – and this also applies to technology in the field of medicine. That’s why it is only a matter of time before hospitals are fully driven by artificial intelligence - data-driven medicine that suggests the best treatment and facilitates zero error surgeries. A path that doesn’t just require openness!
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Image: Dr. Ravindra Kohle and Augusta OncoTarget; Copyright: Phil Jones / Augusta University

MCG lab designated to help with patient testing for NCI-MATCH trial

02/11/2018

The Georgia Esoteric and Molecular Laboratory at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University has been selected as a designated laboratory for the National Cancer Institute's Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice, or MATCH trial, which is assessing the effectiveness of targeting cancer-causing gene changes rather than cancer type.
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Image: several leg pairs during a run; Copyright: panthermedia.net/lzf

Diagnostics at record speeds – POCT in high-performance sports

02/11/2018

This is what diagnostic investigation normally looks like: a patient sample is collected, sent to the laboratory and analyzed. Once that's completed, the patient is told of the lab test result. But if the patient is a high-performance athlete and has to follow and stick to a rigid training schedule, he or she needs these results immediately. What makes this possible? Point-of-care testing!
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Image: Heart cells as seen through a microscope; Copyright: Cedars-Sinai

Biomarker discovered for most common form of heart failure

01/11/2018

A team led by a Cedars-Sinai physician-scientist has discovered a biomarker - a protein found in the blood - for the most common type of heart failure.
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Image: Microscopy; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Robert Przybysz

Gaining unknown insights

01/11/2018

When bones break easily in old age, osteoporosis is often to blame. The cause of the disease and how it develops is not yet sufficiently understood. An interdisciplinary team of scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the Helmholtz Zentrum für Materialien und Energie in Berlin (HZB) is developing a new imaging process to solve this problem.
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Image: Brain-inspired machine learning techniques; Copyright: Virginia Tech

Brain-inspired methods to improve wireless communications

31/10/2018

Researchers are always seeking more reliable and more efficient communications, for everything from televisions and cellphones to satellites and medical devices. One technique generating buzz for its high signal quality is a combination of multiple-input multiple-output techniques with orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.
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Image: Doctors and 3D-DNA; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Scientists call for unified standards in 3D genome and epigenetic data

31/10/2018

Studying the three-dimensional structure of DNA and its dynamics is revealing a lot of information about gene expression, expanding our knowledge of how cells, tissues and organs work in health and disease. Properly producing and managing this large amount of data is both challenging. Now top researchers call for unified standards and suggest guidelines in this research area.
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Image: Raman microscopy to develop better cancer drugs; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Alex011973

Testing cells for cancer drug resistance

30/10/2018

Biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that Raman microscopy can be used to detect the resistance of tumour cells to cancer drugs. Unlike conventional approaches, this method does not require any antibodies or markers. It detects the response of cells to administered drugs and therefore could determine the effect of drugs in preclinical studies.
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Image: Measurement of brainwave activity in a child with autism; Copyright: panthermedia.net / yacobchuk1

Brainwave activity reveals potential biomarker for autism in children

30/10/2018

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that can impair communication ability, socialization, and verbal and motor skills. It generally starts in early childhood and is diagnosed through behavior observation. This means of assessment can be imprecise, which is especially problematic when early identification is vital for developmental follow up.
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Image: Infectious bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics; Copyright: panthermedia.net / katerynakon

Machine learning identifies antibiotic resistance genes

29/10/2018

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed an approach that uses machine learning to identify and predict which genes make infectious bacteria resistant to antibiotics. The approach was tested on strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis--the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) in humans. It identified 33 known and 24 new antibiotic resistance genes in these bacteria.
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Image: Antibody against tumor cells; Copyright: panthermedia.net / toeytoey

Novel method to block immunosuppression in cancer

29/10/2018

Belgian research groups from the UCLouvain and WELBIO, VIB and Ghent University, and the biotechnology company argenx elucidated the three-dimensional structure of an assembly of proteins that dampen immune responses. They also discovered how an antibody can block this assembly. Such an antibody could serve to stimulate immunity against tumor cells in cancer patients.
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Image: Prof Liu Xiaogang (right) and Dr Chen Qiushui (left) ; Copyright: National University of Singapore

Safer and less expensive X-ray imaging

26/10/2018

Medical imaging, such as X-ray or computerised tomography (CT), may soon be cheaper and safer, thanks to a recent discovery made by chemists from the National University of Singapore (NUS).
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Image: Blood-slide-mcmaster ; Copyright: Kevin Patrick Robbins, McMaster University

New surfaces create safer implants

24/10/2018

Researchers at McMaster University have solved a vexing problem by engineering surface coatings that can repel everything, such as bacteria, viruses and living cells, but can be modified to permit beneficial exceptions.
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Image: visualized thoughts of a man ; Copyright: panthermedia.net / olly18

Brain wave device enhances memory function

23/10/2018

The entrainment of theta brain waves with a commercially available device not only enhances theta wave activity, but also boosts memory performance. That's according to new research from the Center for Neuroscience at the University of California, Davis, published recently in the journal Cognitive Neuroscience.
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Image: Stetoscope lies on an EGK; Copyright: panthermedia.net / BrianAJackson

Healthy aging: further research needed on measurement methods in geriatrics

22/10/2018

Today’s society is faced with an aging population. The past has seen the development of many methods for measuring body composition in older adults. However, some of these techniques are not available to medical practices and hospital facilities or are in dire need of optimization.
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Image:Lung; Copyright: panthermedia.net/CLIPAREA

Lung Imaging – Keeping the Respiratory System Healthy

05/10/2018

Many people have damaged or suboptimally functioning lungs. An accurate diagnosis and subsequent treatment are vital to protect this life-sustaining organ. Modern imaging solutions help physicians and patients understand what happens inside the lungs.
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Image: graphical steps of lung segmentation; Copyright: Universitätsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus/A. Braune

Lung segmentation: easier and faster thanks to new algorithms

01/10/2018

A look inside the lungs is a time-consuming process. To identify the boundaries of the respiratory organ from surrounding other organs, tissues, and structures requires between 200 and 500 computed tomographic images and subsequent manual markings – an elaborate process that can take up to six hours. An optimized computer program is now able to do this in only a few seconds.
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Image: About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime; Copyright: panthermedia.net/stasique

Back pain: The research project Ran Rücken is intended to help

10/09/2018

About eight in ten Germans suffer from back pain during their lifetime. Too much or the wrong movements can also cause problems. "Ran Rücken", the interdisciplinary research project aims to determine the right minimum dose of exercise that proves effective. (Explanatory note: "Ran Rücken" can be loosely translated as "Target the Back")
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Image: View over the shoulder of a person with a tablet in his hand, showing the operating theatre in front of him with screens and devices; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Master plan Smart Hospital: well-connected is half cared for

03/09/2018

Artificial intelligence makes the diagnosis, robots perform the surgery and physicians manage all processes via touchscreen – is that what hospitals of the future will look like? And how far away are we actually from this future? Many hospital facilities are already on their way to becoming Smart Hospitals with the latest technology and where everything and everyone is linked and connected.
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Image: Maria Driesel and her colleagues from inveox next to the new device; Copyright: Astrid Eckert

Pathology 4.0 – inveox automates laboratory processes

22/08/2018

Mix-ups, contamination and sample loss – most errors in pathology happen when specimen are received. Countless samples arrive daily at the laboratory, while the sample entry process is very monotonous. As a result, the work is inefficient. The start-up company inveox has now developed a system that automates the processes in the pathology laboratory, thus making them more efficient.
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Image: View over the shoulders of two doctors at a screen showing a model of a heart; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Wavebreakmedia ltd

Regenerative heart valves: from simulation to replacement

23/07/2018

Every year, more than 250,000 patients worldwide receive heart valve implants. Children require repeated replacement surgery because their bodies are still growing, the prosthetic heart valves are not. Regenerative heart valves solve this problem. Until now, we have only been able to monitor how these living implants develop in the body after the fact. Computer models now make this predictable.
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Image: young woman kneels next to unconscious man and makes call with smartphone; Copyright: panthermedia.net/pixelaway

Resuscitation via videostream – how EmergencyEye can save lives

02/07/2018

When the heart stops beating, irreversible brain damage occurs within minutes without resuscitation. Meanwhile, action is only taken in very few instances of cardiac arrest. Even first responders frequently feel helpless in this situation. In Germany, approximately 65,000 people die each year from sudden cardiac arrest. This is where EmergencyEye comes in to offer valuable support.
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Image: AcCellerator research device at an exhibition stand; Copyright: Daniel Klaue, ZELLMECHANIK DRESDEN GmbH

Cells in the speed trap – diagnosis in a matter of seconds

22/06/2018

A drop of blood provides a lot of valuable information. However, it takes several hours to analyze the blood of a patient and make a diagnosis. This takes away a lot of time that's crucial for treatment. A new method intends to considerably speed up this process by testing the cells in the blood in terms of their deformability and immune response.
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Image: Dr. Betsch next to a computer screen showing scans of the spine; Copyright: privat

Light and Bluetooth – dynamic measurement techniques for orthopedics

02/05/2018

X-rays for diagnostic imaging and therapy evaluation are still the norm in orthopedics. Meanwhile, patients who frequently need X-rays are repeatedly exposed to radiation. That's why the University Hospital RWTH Aachen uses and develops methods that are not just radiation-free but can also capture motions.
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Image: DermaFC developed by Magnosco; Copyright: Magnosco

A startup makes melanin glow: skin cancer diagnostics with Magnosco

09/04/2018

When a skin lesion is suspected to exhibit malignant changes, it is usually promptly removed. However, not all cases require an excision of the affected tissue. The startup company Magnosco has developed a procedure that uses a laser to support the diagnosis and early detection of malignant melanoma.
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Image: young woman with VR-glasses in the VR-Lab, in front of it a young man at a computer, on which a virtual heart can be seen; Copyright: Kompetenzzentrum eLearning in der Medizin Baden-Württemberg

VR Lab for medical students: linking theory and practice

22/03/2018

Virtual reality and medicine are increasingly mentioned in the same context. In addition to the development of applications that support the treatment of patients suffering from chronic pain and anxiety, this technology also benefits medical staff. Two months ago, the Ulm University Hospital has opened the VR Lab, where medical students can train and learn with the help of 3D organs.
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Image: yellow tape measure with capsules in front of it; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Jiri Hera

Personalized cancer medicine: customized treatment

01/03/2018

Everyone is different. This statement also applies to our health. Cancer, in particular, can look and progress differently depending on the individual person. That’s why every patient ideally also needs a customized treatment that is tailored to their individual needs. But how feasible is this idea?
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Image: Stethoscope lying on a world map and transparent icons placed over the entire image; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Everything flows: transportation and material flows in hospital logistics

01/02/2018

During a visit to the hospital, patients naturally expect to receive comprehensive care. Not only does this include the proper treatment, but also a hospital bed and regular meals for example. Patients typically don't ask about the transport logistics this entails for the hospital.
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Image: hospital warehouse; Copyright: panthermedia.net/.shock

Hospital logistics: guarantor of quality and efficiency

01/02/2018

Medical supply distribution, supplying operating rooms with sterile instrument kits, the provision of food and catering services for patients – these are some of the around-the-clock care processes at a hospital. Efficient logistics are crucial to guarantee smooth processes. All of these pieces ultimately come together at the hospital’s in-house logistics center.
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Image: one of Fiagon's electromagnetic surgical navigation systems; Copyright: Fiagon

The surgeon's co-pilot: pin-point accuracy through electromagnetic navigation systems

04/01/2018

The position and alignment of surgical tools in the patient’s body must always be kept in view during the operation process to guarantee success and safety. With fine sensors at the tip of the instruments and an electromagnetic signal, Fiagon's electromagnetic navigation systems accurately reproduce their position in the body.
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Image: Doctor with a laptop, around him various medical images, behind him an ECG; Copyright: panthermedia.net/realinemedia

Surgical navigation systems: Safely guiding the scalpel

04/01/2018

Imaging, navigation, integration – these are terms that describe the modern operating room. All of these components play a key role in accurate surgical procedures. They are integrated into surgical navigation systems, which make complicated medical surgeries considerably safer.
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Illuminated pyjamas treat jaundice in mommy's arms

20/12/2017

Sixty percent of newborns are affected by jaundice during their first days of life. In most cases, the condition is harmless. The ailment is more pronounced in premature babies, whose treatment involves irradiation with blue light in a special incubator – naked and alone.
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Image: Illustration of the Leipzig spoon, which is pushed to the back of the eye; Copyright: University of Leipzig/M. Francke

The "Leipzig Spoon" to cure pathological myopia

22/09/2017

Many people all over the world suffer from myopia, also known as nearsightedness. A severe elongation of the eyeball is the cause behind it. If it continues to progress, it ultimately leads to complete loss of vision. Now an innovative medical device intends to stop this progression in the future.
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Image: A man is working at a laboratory bench, his screen is showing a program that recognizes his gestures; Copyright: Fraunhofer IPA/Heike Quosdorf

Laboratory automation: from note book to gesture recognition

08/08/2017

For centuries, scientific research has succeeded by chronicling experiments with pinpoint accuracy. Yet despite all the progress in the actual laboratory, recording is often still done manually, in notebooks, logs or computer systems for instance. In the future, a gesture recognition system could perform this task for scientists.
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Image: A young woman takes another young woman's blood sample; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Arne Trautmann

Physician Assistant - profession with perspective

22/06/2017

The doctor's profession is exhausting and involves many different activities. For a long time, there have been discussions about how doctors can be supported by other specialists. One solution: help from so-called physician assistants.
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Image: Graphic representation of Europe with small figures depicting the population; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Takahase Segundo

Hospital-acquired infections: pathogens know no borders

03/04/2017

Many aspects are uniformly regulated in Europe, however, hospital hygiene and MRSA prevention, for example, are not. The Netherlands plays a pioneering role in the fight against hospital-acquired infections. The country is an often-cited role model. But can other countries simply adopt the same system? And what makes it so different? MEDICA asked expert Prof. Alexander W. Friedrich.
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Image: Young man with curls with open mouth and hands over head. He is beset with tasks from all sides; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Dima Sidelnikov

Healthy at work: "Occupational health management is a win-win situation"

22/03/2017

Exercising, keeping fit, staying healthy as you age – modern lifestyle goals pursued by many. Another buzzword related to this lifestyle is work-life balance. But how can you maintain this balance if your job makes it impossible to stay healthy? If stress and physical as well as emotional distress cripple employees? Finding a balance is often barely possible.
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Image: Different medical pictograms; Copyright: panthermedia.net/aimage

Collect Data? Utilize Data! – The Blessings of Big Data

01/03/2017

Genome data, MRI images, and blood test results – data collected in the medical sector is not only very heterogeneous but also extremely extensive. However, it is important to not only collect this data but to also utilize it. After all, processed, linked and analyzed data provides many opportunities in research, hospital management and ultimately also for the individual patient.
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Image: Graphic of the generic architectur of the clinical data intelligence;  FAU Erlangen-Nürnberg Medizinische Fakultät

Medical Databases: One for All, All for One

01/03/2017

In the "KDI – Clinical Data Intelligence Project", researchers are trying to consolidate various types of data to make them useable and useful to both medical professionals and scientists. This is a tremendous undertaking, considering the data volumes from different sources. In this conversation with MEDICA, Dr. Martin Sedlmayr explains the project setup.
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Image: A monitor and different displays in the OR, behind this the OR team; Copyright: panthermedia.net/chanawit

Smart versus big: how data can assist in the OR

01/03/2017

The OR is the centerpiece of every hospital and also the most expensive resource that should be used efficiently. Yet in reality, there are often delays when interventions are not intelligently scheduled and take place back-to-back. This is why the InnOPlan Research Consortium wants to make surgical device data usable and useful to improve the operating room planning process.
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Image: Two people are sitting in a room, looking at a screen; Copyright: Rhön-Klinikum, ZTM Bad Kissingenrmedia.net/SimpleFoto

Project TeleView – Telemedicine for refugees

23/01/2017

Refugees who come to Germany struggle with language and cultural barriers – also when it comes to medical issues. Patients are often not able to state their medical history or acute conditions, which requires extra time and means increased costs for medical offices and shelters. The telemedicine project TeleView seeks to offer a solution to this problem.
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Image: Single room with a window in a hospital; Copyright: panthermedia.net/epstock

Hospital construction: infection prevention through architecture?

09/01/2017

Hospitals apply many infection prevention and control measures. They all have one thing in common: they are individual parts of an overall concept that is aimed at preventing the spread of highly infectious and resistant pathogens in hospitals. Nevertheless, previous hygiene concepts ignore one aspect of hospitals: the architecture of the actual hospital facility itself.
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Image: Blurred image of hospital employees who run along a corridor; Copyright: panthermedia.net/SimpleFoto

Medical emergency management in hospitals: there is a need for action

08/11/2016

Emergency situations do not just occur outside the hospital - life-threatening situations can also take place in patient rooms. Aside from the intensive care units, this also pertains to general hospital wards, where patients are not as closely monitored. Nursing staffs need to pay special attention in this case because emergencies sometimes announce themselves with certain symptoms.
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Image: In the middle of a computer window is written in big white letters Diabetes. A hand is tapping onto the word; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Pichet Wissawapipat

Telediabetology: Telemedicine to fight diabetes

02/11/2016

World Diabetes Day is on November 14 of this year. This is reason enough to get informed about the options available in medicine on the subject of "diabetes". One area is telediabetology, a combination of telemedicine and diabetology. It is still not widespread in Germany, but that is about to change because the benefits for patients, physicians and hospitals are obvious.
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Image: Doctor with Laptop, on which screen viruses are visible; Copyright: panthermedia.net/cuteimage

Infection prevention with networked devices

02/11/2016

It is possible to save resources in a hospital by using networked devices – processes work more properly and more quickly this way. But there is also a certain amount of risk: If a device is infected with malware, the infection will spread very fast. Therefore, it is important to protect the networked devices and especially the sensitive patient data.
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Image: A 3D stick figure creates a mind map about

A new broom sweeps clean? The new EU Medical Device Regulation

10/10/2016

The year 2016 brings about the new, eagerly anticipated Medical Device Regulation (MDR). The revision needs to now be implemented by all EU member states in the coming years after there have been ongoing deliberations and negotiations since October 2012.
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Image: Different medical symbols are seen like on a screen. A hand wearing a white glove taps on a symbol; Copyright: panthermedia.net/everythingposs

Networked healthcare – Apps and co.

04/10/2016

Digitization is on the rise and doesn't even stop with medicine. A video doctor consultation, a fitness app or a collection of data for a better cancer treatment: eHealth combines the possibilities of the internet with the demands of medicine and opens up entirely new possibilities for the medical industry.
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Image: Dark haired, smiling woman in a hospital; Copyright: UKR

Inflammatory bowel diseases: More patient comfort and autonomy thanks to an app

04/10/2016

Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis increasingly develop at a younger age and affect patients for life. Regular check-ups need to occur every two to three months. Now, a specially designed app intends to provide relief.
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Image: Blue Stethoscope next to a blue glass globe on a blue keyboard; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Neirfys

Blue versus Green Hospital: Economical in all departments

01/08/2016

Hospitals seldom operate economically and sustainably - old building structures and the intricate logistics operations involving expensive patient care are costly. To get out of the red, hospitals need to become more efficient in all areas. One way to achieve this goal leads through the Blue Hospital Concept.
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Image: Aerial shot of a large hospital in a city; Copyright: panthermedia.net/kruwt

Sustainability: Hospitals can achieve a trifecta

01/08/2016

Humans leave large ecological footprints on the planet. Nevertheless, sustainability - that being resource-conserving and environmentally oriented action - is still far from being a concern everywhere. The public sector, in particular, has a difficult time with this because sustainability requires initial funding to renew and adapt processes and technology. This applies especially to hospitals.
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Photo: Devices and products patients need to treat their diabetes; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ MihaPstock

Artificial pancreas: an (almost) automated diabetes treatment?

22/05/2016

The treatment for diabetes is very time-consuming for patients: they need to regularly monitor blood sugar levels, take medication and inject insulin. Poor self-management may result in a dangerous lapse in blood glucose levels. Yet external factors can also contribute to diabetes being out of control. An artificial pancreas system could offer relief.
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Photo: two physicians working at a test set-up

Atherosclerosis: Getting to the root of the problem with a turbo gene

09/02/2016

Many people suffer from atherosclerosis, especially in developed countries. The buildup of fatty deposits inside the arterial blood vessels leads to strokes and heart attacks. Now, a new method is designed to get to the root of the problem, and with the help of nanoparticles inject new turbo replacement cells into the blood vessels which are intended to exert their curative effect.
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Photo: Knee implant

Customized Implants cover bones optimally

22/01/2016

It may fits, but somewhere it still tweaks. Although a suit off the rack serves its purpose, it is still far from being an ideal solution. With a custom made heart it is different. It is similar with implants. Often patients complain about the fact that those implants feel strange. 3D printing is on the best way to change this. Here, the implants are adapted to the carrier.
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Photo: artificial heart valve

Artificial heart valve: "The structure is meant to be broken down again by the body at a later point."

08/01/2016

There are various artificial heart valves available for children, but they have one essential drawback: they need to be replaced because the children are still growing. The artificial valve, on the other hand, remains the same size – and subsequently becomes too small. This is why an artificial heart valve that grows over time would be ideal.
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Photo: Smiling man - Sven Seifert

A new world: hybrid operating room workstation

02/11/2015

Performing surgery in a hybrid operating room is meant to be a relief for the staff and offer patients new options for treatment. What is actually so different about this hybrid operating room, what can you expect and what should you keep in mind during the planning process?
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Crisis Management: Keeping the big picture in mind

02/03/2015

How should a hospital best respond to an emergency and which types of crises should it be prepared for? We spoke with Professor Ronald Glasberg at the SRH Hochschule Berlin on this subject.
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Hospital crisis communication: A crisis knows no rules

02/03/2015

Crises come in many shapes and sizes. Whether it’s poor hygiene, thefts or treatment errors – once the crisis has arrived, things need to move quickly. For hospitals in particular, the right crisis communication is key. Yet many medical facilities still neglect the fact that crisis communication starts before the actual crisis takes place.
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Photo: Tissue sections on object slides

Digital pathology: From microscope slide to virtual microscopy

02/02/2015

The digitization of medicine moves on. Researchers, physicians and patients equally benefit from this development – thanks to improved diagnostics with highly sensitive devices, today findings can be comprehensively analyzed and treatment decisions made on a broadened basis. Digitization also offers the area of pathology interesting fields of application.
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Xenon magnetic resonance imaging: making pathological changes in the body visible

03/11/2014

As an imaging procedure, magnetic resonance tomography has become essential in clinical practice, since it can easily make organs and tissue visible. However, until now abnormal cancer cells or small centers of inflammation remained almost invisible. Now cell biologists from Berlin, Germany, have succeeded in fixing this problem with xenon magnetic resonance imaging.
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The intensive care unit of the future - speedier recovery through feel good architecture

01/09/2014

The rooms in German intensive care units are cold and dreary. Hectic movements determine the patient’s everyday life along with noisy surveillance systems. Artificial light often also promotes a disturbed circadian rhythm. Sleeping pills are meant to solve this problem, but they also increase the risk of delirium at the same time.
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KOHALA: digital student for cancer treatment

03/02/2014

Shortening a time-consuming procedure from four hours to five minutes and automate it at the same time sounds like a dream come true for employees in all fields and industry sectors. This dream could soon become a reality for radiologists. Software could take away the tedious processing of CT images, which is required before cancer radiation therapy.
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Study approach: surgical trials mean more safety in the operating room

06/01/2014

Whether a surgical suture is better applied manually or with a surgical stapler can be determined through trial and error. Determining which method guarantees patient safety best should also not just be based on a surgeon’s experience. Controlled studies are the method of choice to assess both well-proven and new techniques in the operating room.
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