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Image: two men in the laboratory talking about a document in their hands; Copyright: panthermedia.net/Phovoi R.

Machine learning algorithm helps in the search for new drugs

12/02/2019

Researchers have designed a machine learning algorithm for drug discovery which has been shown to be twice as efficient as the industry standard, which could accelerate the process of developing new treatments for disease.
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Image: 3D bioprinting the Tumor Micro Environment of a glioblastoma; Copyright: University of Twente

3D-bioprinted brain tumor shows interaction with immune cells

11/02/2019

Around a glioblastoma, a very aggressive brain tumor, cells of the human immune system start helping the tumor instead of attacking it. To do research on what happens in the interaction of these cells, scientists of the University of Twente now created a 3D-bioprinted mini model of the brain.
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Image: brain with syringe and medication; Copyright: panthermedia.net / Michael Osterrieder

Breakthrough for brain tumor drug development

07/02/2019

24,000 patients are diagnosed with brain tumors every year with the 5yr survival for high grade glioblastomas (GBM) only 5%, with median survival of 15 months. These poor statistics have remained static for 30 years due in part to a lack of preclinical models for testing new drugs.
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Image: Artificial intelligence-tool; Copyright: Nature/Nigam Shah, Adrien Coulet

Artificial intelligence-tool for chemotherapy dosages

05/02/2019

Finding the right dose of medication by trial and error can be a painful experience for patients. Thanks to a new algorithm created by Adrien Coulet, lecturer at the Université de Lorraine and researcher in a joint Inria and Loria team, in collaboration with researchers from Stanford University, an innovative tool can predict in advance whether patients will need a lower dose of medication.
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Image: A female researcher is looking at a sample on a glass slide; Copyright: Tristan McGuirk

How to train lab-grown heart cells

01/02/2019

Heart muscle cells need exercise - even when they grow outside the human body. A new device designed by U of T Engineering researchers uses a rigorous training regimen to grow small amounts of cardiac tissue and measure how strongly it beats. The platform is ideal for testing the effects of potential drug molecules and could help bring personalized medicine closer to reality.
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Image: 3D-printed absorber for endovascular treatment of liver cancer; Copyright: UCSF graphic

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

11/01/2019

With the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don't respond to more benign treatments.
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Image: A child lying on a bench.; Copyright: Hubert Vuagnat

Buruli Ulcer: Promising New Drug Candidate Against a Forgotten Disease

20/12/2018

Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) resulting in debilitating skin lesions, disabilities and stigmatisation. The current antibiotic treatment is long and has severe adverse side effects.
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Image: man holding his stomach; Copyright: panthermedia.net/ByLove

The cure is in the capsule: carbon monoxide to treat chronic inflammation

22/05/2018

This unusual ally can be extremely valuable in the fight against inflammation in the body: CO (carbon monoxide). As a therapeutic gas, it also promises relief for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Having said that, it is difficult to transport the active ingredient to the exact desired location.
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Image: a container with the nutrient medium for cancer cells; Copyright: Dr. Markus Wehland

Cells in space – extraterrestrial approaches in cancer research

22/02/2018

Here on Earth, all experiments are bound by gravitation. Yet, freed from gravity's grip, tumor cells, for example, behave in an entirely different way. As part of the "Thyroid Cancer Cells in Space" project by the University of Magdeburg, smartphone-sized containers carrying poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells are sent into space.
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Image: blood is taken from a finger and analysed by a blood testing device; Copyright:hes_so_valais_wallis

Without any delay: drug dose adjustment at the point of care

01/08/2017

Many therapeutic drugs are very powerful, but they are also very toxic at the same time. Thus, they have to be measured regularly, again and again, so that an adjustment of the individual drug dosage can be made. Until now, the "normal" way was to take the blood sample, send it to a central laboratory and get the results after some days. A new point-of-care test can measure it in 15 minutes.
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